Exhibitions: 74-Year Old Artist John Alexander – “Landscape And Memory” (Berggruen Gallery)

JANUARY 9 – FEBRUARY 15, 2020

 

John Alexander The Temptation 2019 Landscape and Memory Berggruen Gallery January 2020Berggruen Gallery is proud to present John Alexander: Landscape and Memory, an exhibition of recent paintings and drawings by Texas-born, New York-based artist John Alexander. This show marks Alexander’s second solo exhibition with the gallery and will be on view January 9 through February 15, 2020. The gallery will host an opening reception for the artist on Thursday, January 16 from 5:00 to 7:00pm.

John Alexander’s most recent body of work presents a detailed collection of landscapes, botanicals, sea life, and animals – each subject an emblem of the artist’s own mind and memory. Alexander grew up between the bayous and the wooded wilderness of East Texas, enjoying camping and fishing trips within the lush, diverse landscape that would ultimately become so influential to him. Moreover, Alexander’s understanding and appreciation for the natural world was fortified by his father’s environmentalism. For Alexander, developing an environmental acuity, especially for his native Texas, was familial. Today, the artist creates work in reference to the nature-based consciousness he developed in his youth.

Berggruen Gallery San FranciscoThe introspective nature of Alexander’s work is revealed through the artist’s keen observations of his surrounding environment and the vivid way in which he paints it. Employing bold, painterly strokes, Alexander maintains an acute sensibility of his subject matter – whether it be the detailed rendering of the spiny lobster, an expressive portrayal of grackles and ibises perched in branches, or more expansive, floating florals. The artist also injects elements of whimsy; the playful monkeys he paints peer out of their canvases to almost directly engage the viewer. And thus each work is imbued with an authentic, raggedly pristine, emotional sense of the earth we all inhabit. In this way, Alexander creates scenes that are deeply personal, yet also shared…nostalgic yet ongoing…exotic yet familiar…of the world yet otherworldly. Saturating his landscapes with humor, sentimentality, and veneration, Alexander reveals as much about himself as he does about nature.

John Alexander: Landscape and Memory is comprised of nine paintings and four drawings, work that comes together in reverence for the formal tradition of landscape painting. Paying homage to an Impressionist Master, Claude Monet, Alexander paints dreamy hollyhocks. Invoking the more recent Hudson River School, Alexander carefully creates bucolic scenes of both reality and idealization. Perhaps most unexpectedly, Alexander also nods to the Abstract Expressionists, applying thick strokes of paint in a gestural, emotional meditation. In turn, Alexander’s work pays tribute to the long and varied legacy of landscape painting before him while simultaneously remaining true to his own, very personal, connection to nature. Through the amalgamation of art historical context, environmental conservation, and the integration of a more intimate narrative, Alexander produces a body of work that is raw, compelling, and perhaps above all else, natural.

John Alexander was born in Beaumont, Texas, in 1945. He received his B.F.A. from Lamar University in Beaumont in 1968 and his M.F.A. from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas in 1970. Following graduate school, Alexander taught at the University of Houston. Though the artist’s Texas roots influence much of his work, to solely categorize Alexander as a “Texas” artist would be inaccurate. In 1979, having established himself in Houston as a prominent local artist, Alexander moved to New York City. Today the artist divides his time between his SoHo studio loft and home in Amagansett, East Hampton. Alexander’s work has been widely exhibited at such prestigious institutions as the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, both in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. His work is featured in the permanent collections of several leading institutions, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Dallas Museum of Art; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; as well as many other public and private collections worldwide.

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Aortic Stenosis: Early Aortic-Valve Replacement Surgery Lowers Mortality

Early Surgery or Conservative Care for Aortic Stenosis New England Journal of Medicine January 8 2020 Infographic

CONCLUSIONS

Among asymptomatic patients with very severe aortic stenosis, the incidence of the composite of operative mortality or death from cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period was significantly lower among those who underwent early aortic-valve replacement surgery than among those who received conservative care.

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Top New Travel Videos: “Watchtower Of Spain” By Pablo Zubiría (2020)

Filmed, Edited and Directed by: Pablo Zubiría

Music: Ludovico Einaudi

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Great art. Great books. Even better wine. Centuries of history. The best tiki taka.
Rhythm and music, everywhere you go. Epic nightlife. Mornings included.
Deep conversations. Big laughs. Unique friendships.
Don’t get me started about the food.

This is Spain. This is why I love it so much.

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Health: Management Of Chronic In Older Adults (Mayo Clinic Video)

Geriatricians like Dr. Brandon Verdoorn see the wide range of effects of chronic pain on older patients. Minor, short-lived pain can be managed at home with ice, heat or over-the-counter medication.

If you have severe pain, persistent pain or pain that affects function, you should see your health care provider to determine the underlying cause and develop a pain management plan. That might mean physical therapy, exercise, massage or acupuncture.

Medication strategies often are used, too — typically starting with lower-risk approaches like acetaminophen and topical medications, and reserving higher-risk medications for more difficult cases.

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Travel & Nature Videos: “Rogue River”, Oregon (Conservation Alliance)

The Conservation Alliance 30 Years LogoOn October 2, 2018 – the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act – a bill to protect wild rivers and lands in Oregon moved one step closer to the finish line. The Oregon Wildlands Act (S.1548) passed through the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources suggesting it is ready for the spotlight – approval from the full Senate and House and a signature by the President.

Senators Wyden and Merkely’s Oregon Wildlands Act brings together longstanding efforts to protect outstanding rivers and wild landscapes in Oregon. If passed, the bill would protect 90,000 acres of Wilderness in the Devil’s Staircase and Wild Rogue areas, add 256 miles of Oregon rivers to the Wild & Scenic system, safeguard 128,000 acres of the Rogue and Molalla Rivers as Recreation Areas and withdraw an important section of the Chetco River from new mining claims.

Rogue River Oregon The Conservation Alliance Uncage The Soul Video January 7 2020

Fifty years ago the Lower Rogue River was one of the original eight rivers designated under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The Oregon Wildlands Act would grant nearly 100 miles of tributaries of the Lower Rogue River with the same protections. And, protecting the Rogue, it’s tributaries and it’s surrounding wild landscapes is good for businessAccording to a 2009 economic report, river-based recreation on and near the Wild & Scenic Rogue River accounted for nearly $30 million in economic output and 445 full and part time jobs.

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Top New Science Podcasts: Multiple Missions To Mars, Electric Cars & Dengue Fever Prevention (Nature)

Nature PodcastsIn this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. We’ll hear about multiple missions to Mars, a prototype electric car, efforts to prevent dengue, and more.

Technology Review: AI Camera & Sensor Systems At CES 2020 (WSJ Video)

Two new smart systems use cameras, artificial intelligence and an assortment of sensors to keep watch over you—Patscan looks for threats in public spaces, while Eyeris monitors the driver and passengers in a car. WSJ’s Katherine Bindley visits CES to explores their advantages, as well as their privacy costs.

Essays: 61-Year Old Canadian Writer Don Gillmor Reflects On Baby Boomers (Maclean’s)

From a Maclean’s Magazine online essay (01/08/20):

Don Gillmor in his home office Photograph by May Truong Maclean's Magazine January 8 2020
Don Gillmor in his home office (Photograph by May Truong)

Boomers tore down institutions—divorce rates went up, churchgoing went down. We demonized the corporations that previous generations had venerated, though we bought their products in record numbers, our idealism blurring with the search for the perfect pair of jeans. We wanted it all. In place of institutions, we created the cult of the individual, our own particular Frankenstein.

So much of our music comes back to us in unfortunate ways, Dylan’s anthems barely recognizable in sappy orchestral arrangements that fill the hours we spend on hold. And we seem to be permanently on hold these days. We are between 55 and 73 years old now, still defining this as middle age, still a potent economic force because of our numbers, controlling 70 per cent of disposable income, though it feels to many of us that we have already disposed of it. Still, we bought houses when they were vaguely affordable. And politicians still cater to us because we vote en masse. However, we are largely left out of the cultural conversation, as music and social media continues to evolve, always leaving us one app behind the curve.

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New Travel Books: “Hong Kong – Trope City Edition”

Trope Hong Kong January 2020This carefully curated and bound collection offers a unique modern perspective of Hong Kong. Each chapter in Trope Hong Kong is accompanied by a map of the area along with the locations where the photographs were taken. In many cases, there are several photographs of the same location, shot at different times of the day, in different seasons, with different tones. 

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Trope Hong Kong, the third volume in the Trope City Editions series, celebrates the juxtaposition of colorful chaos and architectural order of this iconic, constantly changing city. The collection highlights the work of 17 emerging photographers from Hong Kong and beyond, who through their passion for the craft, creative development, and social media smarts have amassed a collective Instagram following of 1.3 million.

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