Tag Archives: Baby Boomers

WHO SHAPED THE 1960’S?: CULTURAL CHANGE SWEPT UP THE BOOMERS, IT JUST DIDN’T BEGIN WITH THEM

From a New Yorker article by Louis Menand:

Woodstock GenerationAlthough the boomers may not have contributed much to the social and cultural changes of the nineteen-sixties, many certainly consumed them, embraced them, and identified with them. Still, the peak year of the boom was 1957, when 4.3 million people were born, and those folks did not go to Woodstock. They were twelve years old. Neither did the rest of the 33.5 million people born between 1957 and 1964. They didn’t start even going to high school until 1971. When the youngest boomer graduated from high school, Ronald Reagan was President and the Vietnam War had been over for seven years.

The boomers get tied to the sixties because they are assumed to have created a culture of liberal permissiveness, and because they were utopians—political idealists, social activists, counterculturalists. In fact, it is almost impossible to name a single person born after 1945 who played any kind of role in the civil-rights movement, Students for a Democratic Society, the New Left, the antiwar movement, or the Black Panthers during the nineteen-sixties. Those movements were all started by older, usually much older, people.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-misconception-about-baby-boomers-and-the-sixties

Books On Boomers: “Stop Mugging Grandma” By Jennie Bristow Seeks To Edify The Boomer Bashers

From a Wall Street Journal book review by Daniel Akst:

Stop Mugging Grandma by Jennie BristowAt the center of the attack on those of us born between 1946 and 1964, days when the U.S. birth rate was extraordinarily high, is our supposed radical individualism. Its roots are said to be found in the excesses of the 1960s, a decade for which “boomers have become fall guys.”

Ms. Bristow, to her everlasting credit, isn’t buying it. “What about the two catastrophic world wars that had dominated the first half of the century; the cynical hedonism of the ‘Roaring Twenties’; the parasitism of colonialism and racial segregation?”

Ms. Bristow, a sociology professor in England, shrewdly situates this new resentment in the context of today’s vogue for collective responsibility and the transmission of guilt across many generations. “Generationalism,” as she calls it, “has come to find its most comfortable home within identity politics, that shrill sentiment of victimisation and grievance that has become an increasingly powerful cultural force.”

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/stop-mugging-grandma-review-defying-the-boomer-bashers-11565651816

“The Wizard Of Oz” (1939) May Be The Most Influential Baby Boomer Film Of All-Time

From “The Guardian”:

The Wizard of Oz at 80“…from Elton John’s albumGoodbye Yellow Brick Road to the Coen brothers’ O Brother, Where Art Thou?, which owes as much to Oz as it does to Homer’s Odyssey. Joel Coen once said: “Every movie ever made is an attempt to remake The Wizard of Oz.” In his 1992 essay about Fleming’s film, Salman Rushdie describes it as his “very first literary influence”. It was one of Derek Jarman’s favourite movies, and among the first he ever saw. (This is the key to its influence: the fact that everyone watches it in childhood. It seeps into your unconscious and stays there.) And there are the spin-offs, sequels and prequels – The WizReturn to OzOz the Great and PowerfulWicked.”

Eighty years ago, in the summer of 1939, 16-year-old Judy Garland appeared on cinema screens as the orphan Dorothy Gale, dreaming of escape from bleak, monochrome Kansas. “Find yourself a place where you won’t get into any trouble,” her aunt beseeches, too busy for poor old Dorothy, who soon breaks into song: “Somewhere, over the rainbow, skies are blue / And the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true”. Her wish is soon granted by a tornado that carries her to the gaudy, Technicolor Land of Oz, instilling her as an icon for misfits, migrants, gay kids, dreamers – anyone who has ever wanted to run away.

Read more by clicking the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/jun/17/how-the-world-fell-under-the-spell-of-the-wizard-of-oz

Journal Of Obesity Study Finds Short Duration And High Variability Of Sleep Undermines Weight Loss

“Prospective analysis of 1986 community-dwelling subjects (mean age 65 years, 47% females) with overweight/obesity and metabolic syndrome from the PREDIMED-Plus trial was conducted…

Our findings suggest that the less variability in sleep duration or an adequate sleep duration the greater the success of the lifestyle interventions in adiposity.”

International Journal of Obesity

Click on Journal of Obesity to read article.