Tag Archives: Covid-19

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 30, 2022

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The genetics of a long life

Genetically diverse mice and cross-species comparison uncover links to longevity

New Omicron strains may portend big COVID-19 waves

Emerging subvariants are more immune evasive than ever

Room-temperature superconductor claim retracted

After doubts grew, blockbuster Nature paper is withdrawn over objections of study team

University pandemic policies raise equity worries

Tenure delays and pandemic impact statements could backfire, some fear

Signs of state meddling seen in Russian academy election

Leader of Russia’s largest chipmaker elected president after incumbent’s sudden withdrawal

Fraud charges crumble in China Initiative cases

Judges reject claims that defendants defrauded agencies by not disclosing China ties

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Sept 15, 2022

Volume 609 Issue 7927

Monkeypox, COVID-19, AIDS: have we progressed so little?

Deaths and sufferings are not a failure of technology or knowledge, but a failure of will.

The world’s reservoirs are ageing — and belching out more methane

But carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the global reservoir-building spree in the 1960s and 1970s are falling.

The Jurassic vomit that stood the test of time

A fossilized pile of small bones is probably a meal that an animal heaved up 150 million years ago.

Rarest of elements yield their secrets with help from mighty metals

Surrounding an ion of curium with radiation-resistant clusters of other ions allows scientists to study the scarce substance.

Why some female hummingbirds mimic males: it’s all about nectar

Some female white-necked jacobins nab good feeding spots by adopting the flashy plumage of their bigger, brasher male counterparts.

A sugary diet wrecks gut microbes — and their anti-obesity efforts

A high-sugar diet unbalances the microbiome, so the body makes fewer of the gut immune cells that help to prevent metabolic disorders.

Covid-19: China Approves The First Inhaled Vaccine

The vaccine, called Convidecia Air, changes the liquid form of the vaccine into an aerosol using a nebuilzer. The vaccine can then be inhaled through the mouth using the nebulizer machine. The needle-free vaccine “can effectively induce comprehensive immune protection in response to SARS-CoV-2 after just one breath,” Cansino said in a statement.

Fortune.com on September 5, 2022 – China’s government approved the world’s first inhaled vaccine against COVID-19, the vaccine’s maker Cansino Biologics announced on Sunday.

In July, Chinese scientists published a pre-print study showing that people who received one booster dose of Cansino’s inhaled vaccine after two doses of the inactivated jab from Chinese maker Sinovac developed more antibodies than people who received three Sinovac shots. Four weeks after receiving the inhaled booster, 92.5% of people had developed neutralizing antibodies for Omicron.

Those who got three doses on Sinovac’s jab did not demonstrate any neutralizing antibodies for Omicron, either four weeks or six months after getting a booster.

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Covid-19: Heart Disease Risks Rise After Infection

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In December 2020, a week before cardiologist Stuart Katz was scheduled to receive his first COVID-19 vaccine, he came down with a fever. He spent the next two weeks wracked with a cough, body aches and chills. After months of helping others to weather the pandemic, Katz, who works at New York University, was having his own first-hand experience of COVID-19.

On Christmas Day, Katz’s acute illness finally subsided. But many symptoms lingered, including some related to the organ he’s built his career around: the heart. Walking up two flights of stairs would leave him breathless, with his heart racing at 120 beats per minute. Over the next several months, he began to feel better, and he’s now back to his normal routine of walking and cycling. But reports about COVID-19’s effects on the cardiovascular system have made him concerned about his long-term health. “I say to myself, ‘Well, is it really over?’” Katz says.

In one study1 this year, researchers used records from the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to estimate how often COVID-19 leads to cardiovascular problems. They found that people who had had the disease faced substantially increased risks for 20 cardiovascular conditions — including potentially catastrophic problems such as heart attacks and strokes — in the year after infection with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Researchers say that these complications can happen even in people who seem to have completely recovered from a mild infection.

Some smaller studies have mirrored these findings, but others find lower rates of complications. With millions or perhaps even billions of people having been infected with SARS-CoV-2, clinicians are wondering whether the pandemic will be followed by a cardiovascular aftershock. Meanwhile, researchers are trying to understand who is most at risk of these heart-related problems, how long the risk persists and what causes these symptoms.

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Covid-19: Can A Vaccine Be Developed That Lasts?

“Roughly two and a half years into the pandemic, White House officials and health experts have reached a pivotal conclusion about Covid-19 vaccines: The current approach of offering booster shots every few months isn’t sustainable.

Though most vaccines take years to develop, the Covid shots now in use were created in record time—in a matter of months. For health authorities and a public desperate for tools to deal with the pandemic, their speedy arrival provided a huge lift, preventing hospitalizations and deaths while helping people to escape lockdowns and return to work, school and many other aspects of pre-Covid life.”

Cover Preview: Harper’s Magazine – June 2022

Permanent Pandemic

by Justin E. H. Smith

Will COVID controls keep controlling us?

In January 2022 I came down with mild symptoms of something or other. I was already triple-vaxxed, with a French vaccine passport (“pass vaccinal”) on my iPhone to prove it, and like a true pioneer I had already suffered through a bout of COVID-19 long before, in March 2020. 

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – May 14, 2022

New Scientist Magazine, May 14, 2022

COVER STORIES

  • FEATURES Fascia: The long-overlooked tissue that shapes your health
  • FEATURES The grand plan to create a periodic table of all animal intelligence
  • FEATURES Have we been measuring the expansion of the universe wrong all along?
  • NEWS Simple webcam test could show whether you lack a mind’s eye
  • NEWS How quickly can you catch covid-19 again if you have already had it?

Science: Scanning Sewage For Covid-19, Pandemic Questions, Future Threats

First up, Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss what scientists have learned from scanning sewage for COVID-19 RNA. And now that so many wastewater monitoring stations are in place—what else can we do with them? 

Next, we have researcher Katia Koelle, an associate professor of biology at Emory University. She wrote a review on the evolving epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2: What have been the most important questions from epidemiologists over the course of the pandemic, and how can they help us navigate future pandemic threats?

Check out the full COVID-19 retrospective issue on lessons learned from the pandemic.

This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

[Image: Stephan Schmitz/Folio Art; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

[alt: partially constructed bridge over water filled with giant SARS-CoV-2 viral particles]

Authors: Sarah Crespi; Gretchen Vogel

Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.adb1867