Tag Archives: Paintings

Cocktails With A Curator: Manet’s “Bullfight” (Video)

n this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the turbulent history behind Édouard Manet’s “Bullfight,” once part of a larger work that the artist exhibited at the Salon of 1864. The original canvas was derided and caricatured by critics, prompting Manet to cut it into pieces. The two surviving fragments were brought together for the first and only time during a 1999 exhibition at the Frick. This week’s complementary cocktail is, fittingly enough, the Toreador.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/manetbullfight

Paintings: ‘The Son Of Man’ By Belgian Surrealist Rene Magritte In 1946 (Video)

The “Son of Man” is an iconic painting by Belgian Surrealist artist Rene Magritte.

Rene Magritte was an internationally acclaimed surrealist artist of all time, yet it was not until his 50s, when he was finally able to reach some form of fame and recognition for his work. Rene Magritte described his paintings saying, “My painting is visible images which conceal nothing; they evoke mystery and, indeed, when one sees one of my pictures, one asks oneself this simple question, ‘What does that mean?’ It does not mean anything, because mystery means nothing, it is unknowable.”

Magritte was born in 1898, to a wealthy manufacturer father. In 1912, his mom was found drowned in the River Sambre. She had committed suicide, and the family was publicly humiliated because of it. From 1916 to 1918, Rene decided to study at the Academie des Beaux-Art, which was located in Brussels. He left the school, because he thought that it was a waste of time. All his paintings afterward reflect cubism, the movements which were introduced by Pablo Picass and was very popular at the time. In 1922 he married Georgette, and took a number of small jobs, including painting cabbage roses for a wallpaper company, in order to be able to pay the bills.

During the early period of his career, shortly following his marriage, Rene Magritte would spend the free time that he had, creating art forms and worked on a number of pieces; it was during this time period that he realized surrealism was the art form which he most enjoyed. The Menaced Assassin was one of his earliest pieces in 1926, which showcased the surrealist style which he had been working on; The Lost Jockey was another piece that he introduced in 1925, which also showcased this art form. Over the course of his career, he produced a number of variants on this piece, and changed the format to recreate what the viewer was experiencing.

Art Views: French Painter & Illustrator Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (Video)

Henri Marie Raymond de ToulouseLautrec-Monfa (24 November 1864 – 9 September 1901) was a French painter, printmaker, draughtsman, caricaturist and illustrator whose immersion in the colorful and theatrical life of Paris in the late 19th century allowed him to produce a collection of enticing, elegant, and provocative …

Art: ‘Autumn Rhythm’ – Jackson Pollock (Video)

Autumn Rhythm (Number 30) is a 1950 abstract expressionist painting by American artist Jackson Pollock in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. The work is a distinguished example of Pollock’s 1947-52 poured-painting style, and is often considered one of his most notable works.

Top Art Exhibitions: ‘Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera And Mexican Modernism’ (2020)

“Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection” is on view at the Denver Art Museum through January 24, 2021.

Top New Art Books: ‘Salvador Dalí : The Impossible Collection’

In the popular imagination, possibly no other artist’s work is more recognizable than that of Salvador Dalí. Indeed, for many he is the ultimate mad artist, whose singular vision remorselessly probed his own psychological depths. His nightmarish visions and bizarre landscapes express the angst and turbulence of the twentieth century.

Dalí’s creativity embraced many different modes of expression and was never constrained by any one style. Over eight decades, the prodigious range of Dalí’s activity spanned every conceivable medium, from painting and drawing to sculpture, film, furniture, books, stage design and jewelry, not to mention his highly eccentric public persona, which could be considered an art form in itself.

Selected by curator and art historian Paul Moorhouse, Assouline presents Salvador Dalí: The Impossible Collection, spotlighting 100 works by this extraordinary creative mind, exploring Dalí’s inspirations and array of influences, from Old Masters to realism, Impressionism, Fauvism and Cubism as well as experimental approaches that delved into his obsessions with religion, science and stereoscopy.

Paul Moorhouse is a London-based art historian and curator. Currently chief executive of the Anthony Caro Studio, he was senior curator and head of displays at the National Portrait Gallery, London (2005–17) and senior curator at the Tate (1985–2005), where he was closely involved with the creation of Tate Modern and Tate Britain. He has curated numerous exhibitions internationally and published extensively, with books and exhibition catalogues on major modern and contemporary artists, including Anthony Caro, Salvador Dalí, Alberto Giacometti, Howard Hodgkin, Hans Hofmann, Richard Long, Gerhard Richter, Bridget Riley, Cindy Sherman and Andy Warhol.

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Art Video: “American Gothic” By Grant Wood (Art Institute Chicago)

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at American Gothic, painted by Grant Wood in 1930. One of the most famous American paintings of all time, this double portrait by Grant Wood debuted at the Art Institute in 1930, winning the artist a $300 prize and instant fame. Wood intended this Depression-era canvas to be a positive statement about rural American values during a time of disillusionment.

Grant DeVolson Wood (1891-1942) was an American painter best known for his paintings depicting the rural American Midwest, particularly American Gothic, which has become an iconic painting of the 20th century. 

Travels With A Curator: “Genoa” (The Frick Video)

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” join Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon on a journey to Genoa, one of his favorite cities in Italy. A rich maritime and financial center in the 17th century, Genoa was a natural draw for artists at the time, including the great Flemish painter Anthony van Dyck. The Frick owns three portraits painted by Van Dyck while he resided in Genoa, allowing viewers to peek into the past at a flourishing city at the height of its power and influence.

To see these paintings in detail, please visit our website: https://collections.frick.org/objects…

https://collections.frick.org/objects…

 

New Exhibitions: “Wilhelm Thöny – Dreaming In Times Of Crisis” (Salzburg, AT)

Museum der Moderne Salzburg LogoThe motifs of Thöny’s art are informed by the pervasive unease of the interwar years, whose apprehensions he portrayed in the grotesque and nightmarishly somber drawings he created around 1920 for his unpublished Buch der Träume (Book of Dreams). Other works, however, render serene and idyllic landscapes and urban views as well as scenes from social life.

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Wilhelm Thöny (1888 Graz, AT—1949 New York, US) was a restless cosmopolitan and indefatigable networker whose peripatetic career took him far beyond Austria’s borders. A cofounder of the Secession in his native Graz, he made friends along the way—he spent time in Munich and Paris, on the Côte d’Azur and in New York, among other places—but zealously guarded his creative independence, building an oeuvre that did not align with any of the major tendencies of the period.

The Museum der Moderne Salzburg’s first exhibition devoted to Thöny’s oeuvre since 2010 presents around two hundred works from the museum’s own collection. One highlight in the show are the (letter) illustrations in the artist’s Scrap Book from the 1930s. Observations from everyday life captured with lighthearted humor are interspersed between reflections on the increasingly oppressive political situation. It is the first time that this body of work, which is of outstanding value both for its artistic quality and as a document of its time, is shown in its entirety in Salzburg.

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