Tag Archives: Health

Future Of Health: Lancet Magazine At 200 Years

The Lancet (January 2023) – For our 200th anniversary year we have identified five Spotlight subjects of particular importance. Watch as Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief, and other Lancet Editors around the world outline these Spotlights and discuss priorities for the future of health.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases | Journal | ScienceDirect.com by Elsevier

This year, we draw attention to the most critical issues impacting health globally, the extraordinary people involved in tackling them, and the voices of those most impacted. For five Spotlights, we will run a programme of activities to bring these issues to life and convene the right people and resources in order to drive change in these areas.

Spotlight on Universal Health Coverage
Ensuring all populations globally have access to affordable, quality health care

Spotlight on Research for Health
Prioritising evidence to guide and inform decision making

Spotlight on Child and Adolescent Health
Prioritising the health needs of children and adolescents now

Spotlight on Health and Climate Change
Tackling climate change through the lens of human health

Spotlight on Mental Health
Implementing sustainable global mental health in a fragmenting world

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition – January 2023

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Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter – January 2023:

Ask Tufts Experts: January 2023

Elimination diets … Fish oil and heart arrythmia

Q: What is an elimination diet? Can it be used for weight loss? 

A: Alicia Romano, MS, RD, CSNC, a registered dietitian/nutritionist with the Frances Stern Nutrition Center who specializes in gastrointestinal diseases and food allergies, answers: “I’m glad you asked this question! Elimination diets are sometimes used as diagnostic or treatment tools. They are not for weight loss.

Portion Tips and Tricks

Using common items makes it easy to know how much food you’re really eating.

Health: Why Are Flu, RSV And Strep Surging In 2022?

Daniela Hernandez | WSJ – Getting the flu can increase the risk of getting a second infection, including strep throat. WSJ’S Daniela Hernandez explains the science behind that, plus what it means for the rest of the winter and how we can protect ourselves so the tripledemic doesn’t get worse.

Video timeline: 0:24 – Flu Damage 1:25 – Lower population immunity 2:03 – Who’s most vulnerable? 3:05 – How can we protect ourselves?

REVIEWS: THE TOP 5 ARTICLES ON HEALTHY AGING IN 2022

National Institute on Aging – As 2022 comes to a close, NIA invites you to explore some of the most popular health information topics from this past year:

High Blood Pressure and Older Adults

— High blood pressure, or hypertension, is common in older adults. The good news is that blood pressure can be controlled in most people.

What Is Menopause?

 — Menopause is a normal part of aging for women, but it affects every woman differently.

Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

 — As you age, you may wonder about the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem, such as dementia.

Shingles 

— Shingles is a disease that triggers a painful skin rash. About one in three people will get shingles, but there is a vaccine for older adults to help prevent the disease.

Vitamins and Minerals for Older Adults

 — Vitamins and minerals are types of nutrients that your body needs to survive and stay healthy.

Analysis: How To Make Healthcare Affordable

The cost of health care is unaffordable for many in the developing world. But while universal health care may sound like an impossible dream, it’s more achievable than you might think.

Video timeline: 00:00 – The argument for universal health coverage is clear 00:57 – Thailand’s path to universal health coverage 03:31 – Universal health care around the world 04:48 – How to finance universal health coverage? 05:30 – Rwanda: from genocide to public health exemplar 07:19 – What is a pooling finance system? 08:01 – Which services make the cut? 11:17 – The economic benefits of UHC 12:23 – Could covid-19 be a catalyst for reform?

Reports: Tufts Health & Nutrition – December 2022

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December 2022 Issue:

Beware of “Health-Washing”

Front-of-package health claims can be helpful—but they can also be misleading. Learn how to tell the difference.

Habitual Coffee Consumption Associated with Health Benefits

A study that followed nearly 400,000 middle-aged individuals in the U.K. for a median of over 10 years found that, compared to individuals who reported drinking less than one cup of coffee a day, drinking four or more eight-ounce cups a day was associated with lower risk of 30 medical conditions.

FDA Proposes New Definition of “Healthy” on Food Packages

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently proposed new draft guidelines for food manufacturers who want to label their products as “healthy.” This term was last defined in the 1990s. According to the FDA, “our current definition permits manufacturers to use the claim ‘healthy’ on some foods that, based on the most up-to-date nutrition.

World Economic Forum: Top Stories – Nov 25, 2022

World Economic Forum – Top stories of the week of November 25, 2022:

0:15 This island nation has moved to the metaverse – Rising seas are due to swamp Tuvalu by the end of the century. So the Pacific archipelago of 12,000 people has taken a remarkable step, declaring itself the world’s ‘first digital nation’.

1:39 Crosswords battle memory loss – Researchers studied 107 elderly people with mild cognitive impairment. 4 times a week, they spent half an hour either doing a crossword or completing tasks on a popular brain-training computer platform. Then they were reassessed after 12 and 66 weeks. Crossword players scored better on cognitive decline and daily functioning tests.

2:50 UK is rolling out ‘buzz’ stops for bees – The UK is planting bee-friendly native flowers on the roofs of roadside bus shelters, creating a parallel transport network for bugs. Management company Clear Channel aims to convert 1,000 shelters overall with native plants such as pansies and thyme.

4:05 Entrepreneur running 200 marathons for water – Guli is an Australian entrepreneur and environmental activist. She plans to complete Run Blue in time for the UN Conference on Water in March 2023 and to inspire as many people as possible along the way. Guli’s mission has taken her to the front lines of the global water crisis.

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The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Eye Health: The Causes Of Nearsightedness (Myopia)

Cleveland Clinic – Nearly 1 out of 3 people have a vision disorder called myopia, or nearsightedness, which makes it difficult to view things in the distance. How does it happen? And is there a cure?

Chapters: 0:00 Intro 0:32 What causes nearsightedness? 1:01 Why can’t you see far? 1:20 When does nearsightedness usually begin? 1:42 What are symptoms of nearsightedness? 1:59 Can nearsightedness be corrected? 2:23 Is there a cure for nearsightedness?

What is myopia?

People who have myopia (also known as nearsightedness) have difficulty seeing distant objects, but can see objects that are near clearly. For example, a person who is nearsighted may not be able to make out highway signs until they are just a few feet away.

Myopia affects a significant percentage of the population. It’s an eye focus disorder that is easily corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery.

How common is myopia?

Myopia is very common. According to the American Optometric Association, more than 40% of Americans are myopic, a number that is rapidly rising, especially among school-aged children. Eye experts expect this trend to continue in the coming decades.

Today one in four parents has a child with some degree of nearsightedness. Some eye experts believe that if your child spends an extraordinary amount of time engaged in “near” activities, such as reading or using smartphones and computers, it may raise the risk of developing myopia.

Can myopia lead to blindness?

Usually, myopia is a minor nuisance that can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. But in rare cases, a progressive type called degenerative myopia develops that can be very serious and is a leading cause of legal blindness. Degenerative myopia affects only about 2% of the population. It is believed to be inherited and is more common in Jewish, Japanese, Chinese and Middle Eastern people.

Read more

Health Plans: Pros & Cons Of Medicare Advantage

Consumer Reports – November 2022:

For More Information

When you’re ready to start reviewing plans, check out the Medicare plan finder tool, which will let you compare Medicare Advantage and Part D prescription drug plans available in your area. You can also get this information by calling Medicare at 800-633-4227.

If you’re looking for a Medigap plan, you can also start at medicare.gov, where you can compare the different types of coverage, as well as find the policies available in your ZIP code.

Another good resource is the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), which provides free guidance over the phone. To find your state’s program, go to shiphelp.org or call 877-839-2675.

HEALTH: HOW CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE, DIABETES & HEART DISEASE ARE LINKED

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – The body is complicated! While organs in your body each have a specific job to do to keep you healthy, they still rely on each other to function well. When one organ isn’t working the way it should, it can put stress on other organs, causing them to stop working properly as well.

The relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes, and heart disease is one example of the ways our organs are connected.

The body uses a hormone called insulin to get blood sugar into the body’s cells to be used as energy. If someone has diabetes, their pancreas either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should.

If someone has CKD, their kidneys are not able to filter out toxins and waste from their blood as well as they should.

Heart disease refers to several types of heart conditions. The most common condition, coronary artery disease, leads to changes in blood flow to the heart, which can cause a heart attack.

Make the Connection

So how are these three conditions connected? Risk factors for each condition are similar and include high blood sugar, high blood pressure, family history, obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity.

High blood sugar can slowly damage the kidneys, and, over time, they can stop filtering blood as well as they should, leading to CKD. Approximately 1 in 3 adults with diabetes has CKD.

When the kidneys don’t work well, more stress is put on the heart. When someone has CKD, their heart needs to pump harder to get blood to the kidneys. This can lead to heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Change in blood pressure is also a CKD complication that can lead to heart disease.

Luckily, preventing or managing one condition can help you prevent and manage the others and lower the risk for more complications.