Tag Archives: Reviews

Previews: The Atlantic Magazine – March 2023

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The Atlantic Magazine – March 2023 issue:

We’ve Lost the Plot

Illustration: small abstract human figure stands in between rows of huge glowing smartphone screens
SHIRA INBAR

Our constant need for entertainment has blurred the line between fiction and reality—on television, in American politics, and in our everyday lives.

Sam Bankman-Fried’s Alleged Crimes Have Real Victims

What FTX customers lost may not impoverish them, but they were still cheated.

THE NARCISSISM OF THE ANGRY YOUNG MEN

What to do about the deadly misfits among us? First, recognize the problem.

International Art: Apollo Magazine – February 2023

Apollo Magazine – February 2023:

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  • How Christopher Wren built his reputation
  • The changing face of Silicon Valley
  • An interview with Zineb Sedira
  • The tiger who smoked a pipe
  • Plus: the uncertain market for Old Masters, the Cambridge colleges that have turned to wood, the artists who have taken young women seriously, and reviews of Guido Reni, Edward Hopper and the new museum at the Bibliothèque nationale

Finance Preview: Barron’s Magazine- January 30, 2023

Magazine - Latest Issue - Barron's

Barron’s Magazine – January 30, 2023 issue:

China’s Big Comeback Is Just Getting Started. How to Play It.

The country’s stocks are up 50% since officials rolled back Covid-19 restrictions. Alibaba, Yum China, and other names stand to gain.

23 More Picks From Our Investing Pros

The final installment of this year’s Barron’s Roundtable highlights Deere, Salesforce.com, and other undervalued stocks. Plus, a bevy of bond picks for a rising-rate world.

Lowe’s Is Catching Up to Home Depot. Its Stock Price Will Follow.

The home-improvement retailer is more sheltered from a weakening housing market than you might think. Its stock looks like a buy.

Big Tech Earnings Are Almost Here. Microsoft Has Investors on Edge.

There are still reasons to be bullish on the long-term trend of digital transformation. What to watch in the coming week.

The Bulls Have It in 2023—and Last Year’s Losers Are Winners

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Jan 29, 2023

The New York Times Book Review – January 29, 2023:

Fleeing Slavery in a Top Hat and Cravat

“Master Slave Husband Wife,” by Ilyon Woo, relates the daring escape from bondage in Georgia to freedom in the North by an enslaved couple disguised as a wealthy planter and his property.

Think Screens Stole Our Attention? Medieval Monks Were Distracted Too.

In “The Wandering Mind,” the historian Jamie Kreiner shows that the struggle to focus is not just a digital-age blight but afflicted even those who spent their lives in seclusion and prayer.

‘Age of Vice’: A Lush Thriller Dives Into New Delhi’s Underworld

In Deepti Kapoor’s cinematic novel, a young man from the provinces falls in with a powerful crime syndicate.

Previews: New York Times Magazine- January 29, 2023

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The New York Times Magazine – January 29, 2023 issue:

Student. Athlete. Mogul?

Now that college players are allowed to cut sponsorship deals, some of them are raking in the money — but at what cost to the rest?

Your Next Hospital Bed Might Be at Home

In a time of strained capacity, the “hospital at home” movement is figuring out how to create an inpatient level of care anywhere.

Can Germany Be a Great Military Power Again?

Leery of Russian aggression, Europe’s economic giant is making a historic attempt to revitalize its armed forces. It has a long way to go.

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

January 27, 2023: This week: as robotic figures of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama appear in windows of Louis Vuitton stores in New York, London and Tokyo, Ben Luke talks to Federica Carlotto, a specialist in art and luxury, about the latest collaboration between Kusama and the LVMH brand.

What does it tell us about what the former creative director of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, called the “monumental marriage between art and commerce”? Also this week, the artist Michael Rakowitz hopes to give a public sculpture he made for Trafalgar Square in London to Tate Modern and an Iraqi institution. He explains how it prompted Iraq to request the return of one of the lamassu, the ancient Assyrian sculptures that inspired Rakowitz’s work, from the British Museum to its country of origin.

And this episode’s Work of the Week is I didn’t put myself down for sainthood (2018), a piece made by Rosy Martin in collaboration with Verity Welstead. The photographic ensemble is in the opening displays of the new Centre of British Photography in London. We speak to James Hyman, the art dealer, collector and co-founder of the centre, about the work.

You can hear our interview with Michael Rakowitz when he unveiled the sculpture in Trafalgar Square in the episode from 22 March 2018 and an in-depth conversation with Michael in the episode of the A brush with… podcast from 9 June 2021.Headstrong: Women and Empowerment, Centre for British Photography, London, until 23 April.

Research Preview: Science Magazine- January 27, 2023

Science Magazine (January 27, 2023) – The Amazon forest is changing rapidly as a result of human activities, including deforestation for agriculture, such as these soybean fields in Belterra, Pará, Brazil. Remaining areas of forest are experiencing an increased incidence of fires, drought, and the effects of neighboring land uses. These changes threaten local biodiversity and communities and alter the global climate.

Bird flu spread between mink is a ‘warning bell’

Big outbreak at a Spanish farm reignites fears of an H5N1 influenza pandemic

Can California’s floods help recharge depleted aquifers?

Plans to drown orchards and farm fields to boost groundwater supplies get off to a slow start

In Science Journals

Highlights from the Science family of journals

Previews: The Economist Magazine- January 28, 2023

The Economist Magazine- January 28, 2023 issue:

The humbling of Goldman Sachs

The struggle to reinvent a firm trapped by its own mythology

China is trying to win over Westerners and private firms

But Xi Jinping is unlikely to change

What makes Germany’s Leopard 2 tank the best fit for Ukraine?

It is easier to run than America’s Abrams—and in plentiful supply in Europe

Research Preview: Nature Magazine- January 26, 2023

Volume 613 Issue 7945

nature Magazine – January 26, 2023 issue:

The water crisis is worsening. Researchers must tackle it together

It’s unacceptable that millions living in poverty still lack access to safe water and basic sanitation. Nature Water will help researchers to find a way forward.

Dainty eater: black hole consumes a star bit by bit

Repeating bursts of X-rays lead scientists to a black hole that eats in spurts.

ChatGPT listed as author on research papers: many scientists disapprove

At least four articles credit the AI tool as a co-author, as publishers scramble to regulate its use.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – January 27, 2023

Old world – Inside the 27 January Guardian Weekly | Population | The  Guardian

The Guardian Weekly – January 27, 2023 Issue:

It’s an age-old question: how should nations around the world adjust to their elderly societies? Japan has faced such realities for a while now, but the challenges are becoming increasingly common across the developed world where families are getting smaller, and people are living longer.

Even India – which will soon overtake China as the world’s most populous country – is now seeing an older demographic become more prevalent in some states. The countries of sub-Saharan Africa, meanwhile, look most likely to enjoy the benefits of a younger population as the century progresses. For the Guardian Weekly magazine’s big story this week, Emma Graham-Harrison and Justin McCurry assess what ageing populations hold in store for the world. And Verna Yu reports on the reasons why many young people in China seem reluctant to start families.