Tag Archives: Reviews

Science: Fossil Mystery Solved, A Silk Mother Of Pearl, Bolivian Amazon

The puzzle of PalaeospondylusOver a hundred years ago, archaeologists discovered fossils of the aquatic animal Palaeospondylus. But since then researchers have been unable to place where this animal sits on the tree of life. Now, new analysis of Palaeospondylus’s anatomy might help to solve this mystery.

08:18 Research Highlights

A strong, silk-based version of mother of pearl, and the parrots that use their heads when climbing.

Research Highlight: Silk imitates mother of pearl for a tough, eco-friendly material

Research Highlight: A ‘forbidden’ body type? These parrots flout the rules

10:51 How lasers revealed an ancient Amazonian civilization

Archaeologists have used LiDAR to uncover evidence of an ancient civilization buried in the Bolivian Amazon. The team’s work suggests that this area was not as sparsely populated in pre-Hispanic times as previously thought.

Research article: Prümers et al.

News and Views: Large-scale early urban settlements in Amazonia

Nature Video: Lost beneath the leaves: Lasers reveal an ancient Amazonian civilisation

16:21 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the debate surrounding the first transplant of pig kidneys into humans, and the plants grown in lunar soil.

Nature News: First pig kidneys transplanted into people: what scientists think

Preview: Times Literary Supplement – May 27, 2022

Times Literary Supplement, May 27, 2022 – @TheTLS, featuring @NshShulman on the Queen; @nclarke14 on Melvyn Bragg; @richardlea on nuclear power; Claire Lowdon on Elif Batuman; @RohanMaitzen on Rosalind Brackenbury; @rinireg on abortion – and more.

Cover Preview: Nature Magazine – May 19, 2022

Nature Magazine, May 19, 2022 – At industrial scales, chemical reactions are typically driven by applying continuous heat to the reactants. In this week’s issue, Liangbing Hu and his colleagues show that pulsed heating and quenching can enhance synthetic performance while also saving energy.

Volume 605 Issue 7910

The researchers use a programmable electric current to switch between high and low temperatures very quickly — typically 0.02 seconds on, 1.08 seconds off. Rapidly quenching the reaction gives high selectivity, maintains catalyst stability and reduces energy usage. The cover image illustrates the heater in action for the pyrolysis of methane — the model reaction the team tested. Methane molecules travel through the pores of the high-temperature heater and are selectively converted into useful products.

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – May 21, 2022

COVER STORIES

  • CULTURE Regenesis review: Farming is killing the planet but we can stop it
  • FEATURES Why the next big solar storm might hit Earth without warning
  • FEATURES The female body is misunderstood and this is why, says Rachel E. Gross
  • FEATURES How the massive dogs bred to protect livestock could save wolves too

Book Reviews: Booklist Magazine – May 15, 2022

Booklist Magazine, May 15, 2022 – From a barrier-leaping African American woman in the Gilded Age to a military coup in Guatemala and the woman bookseller who first published James Joyce’s Ulysses a century ago, the most radiant historical novels of the past 12 months illuminate many lives and times.

History Books: ‘The Castle’ By John Goodall (2022)

John Goodall’s The Castle: A history is the much slimmer companion to his magisterial The English Castle, (2011). Partly an attempt to bring the fruits of his research to a wider audience, Goodall’s new book uses extracts and quotations as the foundation of a historical account: each short chapter features an excerpt from a primary source that seeks to illustrate a particular moment. Rather than offering an architectural or conventional narrative history, Goodall explores the concept of the castle as it has been imagined, remade and contested over time. Important castles such as the Tower of London, Kenilworth and Windsor feature throughout.

Reviews: The Prettiest Hotels In Seville, Spain

May 15, 2022 – Seville is ready for a true return to form. The city whose splendour has inspired countless works of music, art and poetry is in the beating heart of Andalucía, with its enchanting streets lined with orange trees and Moorish highlights. It’s a flavour that infuses the city’s architecture, which is also full of colonial influences due to the wealthy merchants that traded across the Spanish Empire. Saturated with various styles and cultures, many of the city’s age-old properties have been carefully converted into cool places to stay, while remaining steeped in heritage. Whether you’re in search of a rooftop pool to dip into or classic Moorish architecture, this is your ultimate guide to the best hotels in Seville.

  • Alfonso XIII
    • Alfonso XIII For a taste of truly regal extravagance, look no further. Built specially for Seville’s 1929 Expo, this majestic establishment was commissioned by the then king of Spain, who gave it his own name. Look out for the monarch’s mahogany and bronze throne: this was originally used in the royal office of the premises, which is where the restaurant Ena now sits. Here, executive chef Brian Deegan had just launched a new menu including grilled Iberian pork with escalivada and scallops with cauliflower foam. The hotel’s 148 rooms alternate Andalusian, Castilian and Moorish decorative styles; with grand stairways, sweeping corridors and ornamental patterns everywhere the eye can see.

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World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

This week The World Economic Forum are highlighting 4 top stories – millennial retirement savings, slingshot tech for satellite launches, China’s cheapest electric car, and Paris noise sensors

Timeline: 00:15 Millennial retirement savings 01:48 Slingshot satellite launches 03:46 China’s cheapest electric car 04:52 Paris installs noise sensors

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – May 13, 2022

A survey of cell types across tissues as part of the Human Cell Atlas, mapped with single-cell transcriptomics in three papers in this issue, lays the foundation for understanding how cellular composition and gene expression vary across the human body in health, and for understanding how genes act in disease.