Category Archives: Arts & Literature

Culture & Coronavirus: “Livraria Lello” In Porto Opens World’s First “Drive-Thru Bookstore”

 

Livraria Lello Porto Portugal
LIVRARIA LELLO OPENS THE FIRST  “DRIVE-THRU BOOKSELLER” IN THE WORLD
From April 1st, between 10 am and 12 noon, from Monday to Friday, Livraria Mais Livraria Lello Drive-Thru April 2020 Mensagem by Fernando Pessoa April 1 2020Bela do Mundo will offer one book from its “The Collection” per day to all readers who subscribe the day before to which they intend to address the “Drive-Thru” of Livraria Lello.
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The same should be done until 6 pm, to the email  info@livrarialello.pt , sending your personal data (name, address, email and telephone contact).
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On the day of the survey, the reader will only have to stop the car in front of Livraria Lello and the delivery will be made by a collaborator directly through the window.
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Livraria Lello Porto Portugal LogoThis is a true act of “Love in the Times of Cholera” by Livraria Lello and her team towards their readers, their city, which is their world. A way to give the community some comfort and some encouragement in these difficult times.

 

Art: “Van Gogh In Paris, 1886” (Hammer Galleries)

TEFAF’s Meet the Experts presents Howard Shaw from Hammer Gallery shares what Van Gogh would have most likely seen when he visited Paris in 1886. This period of Van Gogh’s life is pivotal to his works as an artist.

Art Magazines: “Apollo” April 2020 Issue Released

INSIDE THE ISSUE
FEATURES | Michael Prodger visits the newly resplendent Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister in Dresden; Yinka Shonibare talks to Samuel ReillySeamus Perry considers the visual qualities of Wordsworth’s poems; Tim Smith-Laing on the modern monsters of Léopold Chauveau; Emilie Bickerton looks at how museums tackle the subject of cinema; Christopher Turner talks to Grażyna Kulczyk, founder of the Muzeum Susch
REVIEWS | Matthew Sperling on Picasso’s works on paper at the Royal Academy; Nicholas Hatfull on Edward Hopper at the Fondation Beyeler; Scott Nethersole on Renaissance art in the regions of Italy; Alan Powers on the life of Humphrey Stone; Max Norman on a new study of Poussin; Peter Parker on John Minton’s illustrations for Elizabeth David’s cookery books
MARKET | Tim Maxwell and Tamara Bell on cybersecurity; and the latest art market columns from Susan Moore and Emma Crichton-Miller
PLUS | Matt Stromberg and J. Patrice Marandel consider if LACMA has lost its way; Kitty Hauser takes a personal view of the bushfires in Australia; Rachel Cohen on the resurgence of interest in the painter Beauford DelaneyFatema Ahmed on a display of chivalry in Abu Dhabi; Douglas Murphy visits an art nouveau masterpiece in NancyRobert O’Byrne on a talented Dutch curator; and Thomas Marks on museums and the art world in a time of crisis

Literature: A Reading Of “For Whom The Bell Tolls” – Ernest Hemingway (1940)

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The first three chapters of Ernest Hemingway’s classic novel.

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American volunteer attached to a Republican guerrilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As a dynamiter, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia.

It was published just after the end of the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939), whose general lines were well known at the time. It assumes the reader knows that the war was between a democratically elected, pro-working-class and anti-Catholic government, supported by the Soviet Union, which many foreigners like Robert went to Spain to help, and a successful, dictatorial, Catholic, pro-landowner revolt, supported by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. It was commonly viewed as the dress rehearsal for the Second World War. In 1940, the year the book was published, the United States had not yet entered the war, which had begun on Sept. 1, 1939, with Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland.

The novel is regarded as one of Hemingway’s best works, along with The Sun Also RisesA Farewell to Arms, and The Old Man and the Sea.

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American journalist, novelist, short-story writer, and sportsman. His economical and understated style—which he termed the iceberg theory—had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his adventurous lifestyle and his public image brought him admiration from later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short-story collections, and two nonfiction works. Three of his novels, four short-story collections, and three nonfiction works were published posthumously. Many of his works are considered classics of American literature.

From Wikipedia

Podcast Interviews: Irish-British Author Maggie O’Farrell On Her New Novel “Hamnet” (BBC)

BBC Radio 4 Books and AuthorsBBC Radio 4 “Books And Authors” Talks To Maggie O’Farrell on her new novel, “Hamnet”

 

Hamnet Maggie O'Farrell March 31 2020On a summer’s day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home?

Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week.

Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker’s son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.

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New Book Podcast: “The Poster – A Visual History” Authors Gill Saunders & Margaret Timmers (V&A)

Monocle 24 The StackMonocle 24 speaks with Gill Saunders and Margaret Timmers about their upcoming book ‘The Poster’ from Thames & Hudson in partnership with the V&A.

Featuring posters from the world-class collection of the Victoria and Albert Underground Electric Railways Co of London Poster 1930 V&A MuseumMuseum, this book is the perfect resource for all those who appreciate one of the most popular art forms.

Even in the digital age, the printed poster has continued to be one of the most influential and well-loved ways of informing and entertaining audiences. A powerful means of mass communication, posters are an invaluable resource for understanding the time periods in which they were produced and distributed and have often played key roles in shaping society.

Organized into seven thematic chapters, The Poster brings together more than 300 examples that offer a comprehensive history of the poster as a medium that has been used to share, sell, or incite political and social change. The text traces the poster through innovations in design, illustration, typography, and printing, as well as movements in art, including Art Nouveau, modernism, Art Deco, psychedelia, and punk.

Featuring works by A. M. Cassandre, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Alphonse Mucha, Milton Glaser, Paula Scher, and Peter Gee, and many more, this book is an essential resource for graphic designers, illustrators, and anyone interested in social and political history.

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New Art Books: “Gaughin And The Impressionists” – “Stunning” (June 2020)

Joining an already impressive collection of Scandinavian art, one of the first French paintings Hansen acquired was Woman with a Fan, Portrait of Madame Marie Hubbard (1874) by Berthe Morisot. This gently ironic work set the tone for his perceptive and adventurous collecting style. 

Drawn from the remarkable Ordrupgaard Collection of the Danish insurance broker and Berthe Morisot Young Girl on the Grass The Red Bodice 1885art lover Wilhelm Hansen, the masterpieces of 19th-century French painting in this volume represent the very best of French impressionism.

A burst of acquisitions from 1916 to 1918, during which he took advice from the influential critic Théodore Duret, saw his collection grow to include works by Cézanne, Courbet, Gauguin, Manet, Matisse, Monet, Renoir and Sisley.

With stunning reproductions of 60 works, the authors explore the history of the collection and provide detailed analysis of the works themselves.

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