Category Archives: Arts & Literature

Previews: The New Yorker Magazine- February 6, 2023

An illustration by Malika Favre. It shows the back of a couple walking on the Brooklyn Bridge.
Art by Malika Favre

The New Yorker – February 6, 2023:

When Law Enforcement Alone Can’t Stop the Violence

Corey Winfield leans through the window of a car, photographed by Rahim Fortune.

Amid a murder crisis in America, community-based solutions have received a flood of funding. How effective are they?

Hildegard of Bingen Composes the Cosmos

How a visionary medieval nun became a towering figure in early musical history.

The Hunt for Russian Collaborators in Ukraine

As occupied territories are liberated, some residents face accusations that they sided with the enemy.

Malika Favre’s “Connected”

The artist discusses seeking inspiration from her surroundings and experiencing new ways of living.

International Art: Apollo Magazine – February 2023

Apollo Magazine – February 2023:

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  • How Christopher Wren built his reputation
  • The changing face of Silicon Valley
  • An interview with Zineb Sedira
  • The tiger who smoked a pipe
  • Plus: the uncertain market for Old Masters, the Cambridge colleges that have turned to wood, the artists who have taken young women seriously, and reviews of Guido Reni, Edward Hopper and the new museum at the Bibliothèque nationale

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Jan 29, 2023

The New York Times Book Review – January 29, 2023:

Fleeing Slavery in a Top Hat and Cravat

“Master Slave Husband Wife,” by Ilyon Woo, relates the daring escape from bondage in Georgia to freedom in the North by an enslaved couple disguised as a wealthy planter and his property.

Think Screens Stole Our Attention? Medieval Monks Were Distracted Too.

In “The Wandering Mind,” the historian Jamie Kreiner shows that the struggle to focus is not just a digital-age blight but afflicted even those who spent their lives in seclusion and prayer.

‘Age of Vice’: A Lush Thriller Dives Into New Delhi’s Underworld

In Deepti Kapoor’s cinematic novel, a young man from the provinces falls in with a powerful crime syndicate.

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

January 27, 2023: This week: as robotic figures of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama appear in windows of Louis Vuitton stores in New York, London and Tokyo, Ben Luke talks to Federica Carlotto, a specialist in art and luxury, about the latest collaboration between Kusama and the LVMH brand.

What does it tell us about what the former creative director of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, called the “monumental marriage between art and commerce”? Also this week, the artist Michael Rakowitz hopes to give a public sculpture he made for Trafalgar Square in London to Tate Modern and an Iraqi institution. He explains how it prompted Iraq to request the return of one of the lamassu, the ancient Assyrian sculptures that inspired Rakowitz’s work, from the British Museum to its country of origin.

And this episode’s Work of the Week is I didn’t put myself down for sainthood (2018), a piece made by Rosy Martin in collaboration with Verity Welstead. The photographic ensemble is in the opening displays of the new Centre of British Photography in London. We speak to James Hyman, the art dealer, collector and co-founder of the centre, about the work.

You can hear our interview with Michael Rakowitz when he unveiled the sculpture in Trafalgar Square in the episode from 22 March 2018 and an in-depth conversation with Michael in the episode of the A brush with… podcast from 9 June 2021.Headstrong: Women and Empowerment, Centre for British Photography, London, until 23 April.

Books: TLS/Times Literary Supplement- Jan 27, 2023

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Times Literary Supplement (January 27, 2023) @TheTLS , featuring @TimParksauthor on Italo Calvino; @15thcgossipgirl on the Wife of Bath; @NshShulman on Prince Harry; Fredrik Logevall on Jefferson the writer; @lejhouston on queer poetry; @RSmythFreelance on Ronald Blythe – and more.

Books: London Review Of Books – February 2, 2023

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London Review of Books (LRB) – February 2, 2023:

‘Island nations tend to be complacent about border problems, seeing them as things that happen to someone else. But then you have Brexit and Northern Ireland, and it suddenly becomes clear that no one is safe.

Russia is fighting Ukraine about borders. This means that, as well as dodging bombs and getting used to living in the dark, residents of the border zone have to decide if they are “really” Russian or “really” Ukrainian.

Some will no doubt be keeping the non-chosen identity in a trunk in the attic, to be retrieved in case of future need. But the logic of war is stern: those who choose to be Ukrainians are also opting to hate Russians as the enemy invader, while those in Ukraine who choose to be Russians are contemplating the possibility of having to move east.

Wherever the border ultimately settles, there will be fortifications and troops stationed on either side and a series of tightly controlled crossing points. Villages and families will be divided and the normal commerce of economic and social life disrupted. Schools will teach in the language of the victor. Roads that used to lead somewhere will end abruptly.’


The Curtain and the Wall: A Modern Journey along Europe’s Cold War Border 
by Timothy Phillips

On the Edge: Life along the Russia-China Border by Franck Billé and Caroline Humphrey

Previews: The New Yorker Magazine- January 30, 2023

Christoph Niemanns “Highway and Byways”

The New Yorker – January 30, 2023 Issue:

The Mayor and the Con Man

Bishop Lamor Whitehead and Eric Adams stand while speaking at a bar.

Eric Adams’s friends and allies have puzzled over his relationship with Lamor Whitehead, a fraudster Brooklyn church leader.

After Bolsonaro, Can Lula Remake Brazil?

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, photographed by Tommaso Protti.

Following a prison term, a fraught election, and a near-coup, the third-time President takes charge of a fractured country.

What’s the Matter with Men?

A girl leap-frogging over a boy in a superhero costume.

They’re floundering at school and in the workplace. Some conservatives blame a crisis of masculinity, but the problems—and their solutions—are far more complex.

Native American Art: Tour Of ‘Raven And The Box Of Daylight’ Exhibition (2023)

CBS Sunday Morning – Preston Singletary, a member of the Tlingit tribe of Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, uses a very untraditional medium when fashioning indigenous art: glass.

He talks with correspondent Lilia Luciano about his traveling exhibition, “Raven and the Box of Daylight” (now at the Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.), which tells a Native American folktale about the origins of the world entirely through glass.

Preston Singletary: Raven and the Box of Daylight

The story Raven and the Box of Daylight, which tells how Raven transformed the world and brought light to the people by releasing the stars, moon, and sun, holds great significance to the Tlingit people of the North Pacific Coast. A new body of work by artist Preston Singletary immerses readers in Tlingit traditions by telling this story through his monumental glass works and installations. Primarily known for his celebration of Tlingit art and design, Singletary explores new ways of working with glass inspired by Tlingit design principles. This book includes texts that place Singletary’s work within the histories of both glass art and Native arts traditions—especially the art of spoken-word storytelling. Also included are a biography and an interview with the artist. Co-authored by Miranda Belarde-Lewis and John Drury.

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Jan 22, 2023

Illustration by Anthony Gerace

The New York Times Book Review – January 22, 2023:

A New Novel Confronts the Scale and Gravity of Climate Change

As catastrophe approaches, Stephen Markley’s “The Deluge” considers its many facets.

A Documentarian Travels the World Asking: ‘Have You Eaten Yet?’

From the Arctic to the Amazon, Cheuk Kwan traces a diaspora through Chinese restaurants owned and operated by immigrant families.

Read Your Way Through Newfoundland

Michael Crummey, an award-winning author whose poetry and prose explore the region and its capital, St. John’s, shares book recommendations, local vocabulary and where to find a good pint.

Arts & Culture: The New Criterion – February 2023

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The New Criterion – February 2023 Issue:

Caesar & the republic  by Adrian Goldsworthy
Otto von Habsburg’s legacy  by Edwin J. Feulner
Garshin: a genius at suffering  by Gary Saul Morson
Saarinen & starchitecture  by Michael J. Lewis


New poems  by Rachel Hadas, Ryan Wilson & Duncan Wu