Category Archives: Arts & Literature

September 2022 Reviews: ‘WSJ 12 Books To Read’

The Car: The Rise and Fall of the Machine That Made the Modern World

By Bryan Appleyard Pegasus

In their brief ascendancy, cars have dominated every aspect of public and private life and changed our understanding of space, time and nature. Review by Mark Yost.

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PHOTO: AVID READER

One Hundred Saturdays: Stella Levi and the Search for a Lost World

By Michael Frank Avid Reader

A chance meeting with a Holocaust survivor blossomed into weekly conversations—and a journey into a vanished world. Review by Heller McAlpin.

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PHOTO: CROWN

Prisoners of the Castle: An Epic Story of Survival and Escape from Colditz, the Nazis’ Fortress Prison

By Ben Macintyre Crown

Built on a rock outcrop, the grim German castle once housed the incurably insane. Then it became a prison for unruly Allied POWs. Review by Alex Kershaw.

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PHOTO: VIKING

Russia: Revolution and Civil War, 1917-1921

By Antony Beevor Viking

If the American Civil War ended slavery, and the English Civil War restrained the monarchy, what did the Russian Civil War achieve? Review by Douglas Smith.

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PHOTO: MIT PRESS

Working With AI: Real Stories of Human-Machine Collaboration

By Thomas H. Davenport and Steven M. Miller MIT Press

A compendium of case studies in which corporations stopped worrying and introduced artificial intelligence into their workflow. Review by Matthew Hutson.

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Cultural Traditions: The Artists Of Taipei, Taiwan

Taipei is a very modern city with a rich history. Many of the artists who live here are finding ways to keep Taiwan’s unique cultural traditions alive.

Video timeline: 00:00 Intro 00:54 Dadaocheng, meeting Zo Lin, foraging artist 02:14 Grassland’s Private Garden with foraging artist Tiffany Lai 06:41 Ximending, meeting comic artist Yeh Yu Tung 07:21 Wan Nan Building 08:11 Yeh Yu Tung’s Studio 10:23 Dadocheng Wharf 11:00 Taipei Main Station, Meeting Hsu Yenting, sound artist 12:35 Shing-Chen Street 14:04 Exhibition Hall Ever Burning 15:46 Jian-Guo Traditional Market, meeting contemporary artist Paco Uong 20:24 Taipei Tien-Hou Temple with collage artist Ni Jui Hung 22:13 Yat-Sen Park 22:53 Jui Hung’s Studio 24:50 Xiangshan

The host of this episode Allison Lin is an actress and photographer in Taipei, Taiwan. She studied interactive multimedia design at the Houston College of Art in the US. Allison meets the artists Zo Lin & Tiffany, Yeh Yu Tung (comic artist), Hsu YenTing (sound artist), Paco Uong (contemporary artist) and Ni Rui-Jung (collage artist).

Arts & Culture: ‘Burning Man 2022 – Waken Dreams’

“Capturing Burning Man on camera is my way of bringing all the feelings, the emotions, the experiences that words can’t describe into a visual journey. It’s my way of paying homage to the artists and creatives whose contributions bring the playa to life. And above all, it’s my gift of gratitude to a community I love.” – Vincent Rommelaere

Watch this breathtaking short film featuring just some of the art, life, and mutant vehicles of Black Rock City 2022.

Filmed and edited by Vincent Rommelaere, aerial cinematography by Jamen Percy. Find them on Instagram: @vincent.rommelaere and @jamenpercy.burn

Previews: The American Scholar – Autumn 2022

Autumn 2022

The Root Problem

Harvesting wild ginseng has sustained Appalachian communities for generations—so what will happen when there are no more plants to be found?

The Degradation Drug

A medication prescribed for Parkinson’s and other diseases can transform a patient’s personality, unleashing heroic bouts of creativity or a torrent of shocking, even criminal behavior

Why We Are Failing to Make the Grade

Covid-19 has contributed to a crisis in America’s classrooms, but the problems predate the pandemic and are likely to outlast it

Covers: New York Review Of Books – Oct 20, 2022

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The Two Elizabeths

The queen presided over the death of a British world and yet was enormously successful in keeping alive the monarchy that symbolized it.


Last Poem

A poem by Emily Berry


‘She Captured All Before Her’

Darryl Pinckney

It used to be that people complained how little they knew of Queen Elizabeth. Toward the end, her remoteness was treasured.


Silences and Scars

Jenny Uglow

Two new books on Berlin track the city through decades of growth, economic desperation, artistic innovation, Nazi terror, political division, and reunification.

Berlin: Life and Death in the City at the Center of the World by Sinclair McKay

The Undercurrents: A Story of Berlin by Kirsty Bell


Lucky Guy

Joshua Cohen

Jared Kushner’s anti-ideological ideology is to get the best deal for whomever he represents—the business he was born into, the business he married into, and, most of all, himself.

Breaking History: A White House Memoir by Jared Kushner

Arts & History: ‘Winslow Homer – Force Of Nature’

Why is Winslow Homer a household name in the USA? And what makes his art so important? Follow Homer’s journey, at a time of great upheaval in American history, from magazine illustrator to sought-after artist in oil and watercolour.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature Ground Floor Galleries Until 8 January 2023

Previews: London Review Of Books – October 6, 2022

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Our new issue is finally online, ft Mahmood Mandani on leaving Uganda, Tony Wood on Russia’s energy crisis, @MJCarter10 at Westminster Abbey, @danielsoar on Ian McEwan, @amiasrinivasan on Andrea Dworkin, T.J. Clark on painting & poetry & a @Jon_McN cover.

On Leaving Uganda

Uganda’s constitution of 1995 entrenched the barrier against citizenship for non-indigenous applicants, who now had to belong to an indigenous group.

At Westminster Abbey

The bald lesson of the abbey’s memorials is that money, power and connections repeatedly trump virtue and talent.

2022 Museum Tours: Musée d’Orsay In Paris, France

Musée d’Orsay, (French: “Orsay Museum”) national museum of fine and applied arts in Paris that features work mainly from France between 1848 and 1914. Its collection includes painting, sculpture, photography, and decorative arts and boasts such iconic works as Gustave Courbet’s The Artist’s Studio (1854–55), Édouard Manet’s Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe (1863; Luncheon on the Grass), and Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (1876; Bal du moulin de la Galette).

The Musée d’Orsay is housed in the former Gare d’Orsay, a railway station and hotel that was designed by Victor Laloux and located on the Left Bank of the Seine River opposite the Tuileries Gardens. At the time of its completion in 1900, the building featured an ornate Beaux Arts façade, while its interior boasted metal construction, passenger elevators, and electric rails.

Because of changes in railway technology, however, the station soon became outdated and was largely vacant by the 1970s. Talks to transform the builing into an art museum began early in the decade and were finalized in 1977 through the initiative of Pres. Valéry Giscard d’Estaing. With government funds, the building was restored and remodeled in the early 1980s by ACT architecture group.

The interior was designed by Gaetana Aulenti, who created a complex layout of galleries that occupied three main levels surrounding the atrium beneath the building’s iconic iron-and-glass barrel vault. On the ground floor, formerly the building’s train platforms, extensive stone structures broke up the cavernous space and created a central nave for the sculpture collection and gallery spaces for painting and decorative arts.

Previews: Times Literary Supplement – Sept 30, 2022

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This week’s @TheTLS , featuring @RichardEvans36 on German militarism; Laura Thompson on Raine Spencer; A. N. Wilson on Turgenev; @colincraiggrant on Eureka Day; Claire Lowdon on Kamila Shamsie; @rauchway on interest rates – and more.