Tag Archives: Poetry

Literary Previews: The Paris Review – Spring 2022

Shakespeare & Company: Poets Richard Barnett & Luke Kennard (Podcast)

Poetic Views: Museum at Wordsworth Grasmere

The Museum at Wordsworth Grasmere, the second phase of work at the former Lake District home of the great English Romantic poet William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy, has opened to the public, with all gallery, exhibition design and interpretative overviews by Nissen Richards Studio.

The first phase of work by Nissen Richards Studio encompassed the conservation and reinterpretation of Dove Cottage itself, where William and Dorothy once lived, plus the new identity for Wordsworth Grasmere and the scheme’s signage and wayfinding.

The new visitor journey, designed by Nissen Richards Studio in close collaboration with the Wordsworth Grasmere team, includes a series of threshold moments, such as a totem sign and the setting of words into the walkways, featuring fragments of poems going off in two directions, so that visitors see them clearly on arrival and departure.

The Museum includes a shop and ticketing area, before visitors enter a new, double-height orientation space, where quotations by Wordsworth are set within a dramatic, full-height light wall. Visitors then make their way to a former stable space that houses an immersive introductory film, before stepping over the threshold into Dove Cottage. Visitors return to The Museum via Dove Cottage’s Garden-Orchard, entering an expanded first floor space, loosely arranged into four new galleries. Galleries One and Four are set to one side and Galleries Two and Three to the other, whilst a pause space in between offers views onto the gardens and surrounding landscape.

Poetry Readings: “I Am!” – By John Clare (1793 – 1864)

Read by John Davies

John Clare was an English poet who lived most of his life in abject poverty. His life was marred by bouts of mania and depression, and for the final 23 years of his life, Clare was locked in an insane asylum. It was here he began to write poetry; ‘I Am’ was Clare’s final elegy before his passing.

I Am!

BY JOHN CLARE

I am—yet what I am none cares or knows;
My friends forsake me like a memory lost:
I am the self-consumer of my woes—
They rise and vanish in oblivious host,
Like shadows in love’s frenzied stifled throes
And yet I am, and live—like vapours tossed

Into the nothingness of scorn and noise,
Into the living sea of waking dreams,
Where there is neither sense of life or joys,
But the vast shipwreck of my life’s esteems;
Even the dearest that I loved the best
Are strange—nay, rather, stranger than the rest.

I long for scenes where man hath never trod
A place where woman never smiled or wept
There to abide with my Creator, God,
And sleep as I in childhood sweetly slept,
Untroubling and untroubled where I lie
The grass below—above the vaulted sky.

Reviews: ‘The Collected Works Of Jim Morrison – Poetry, Journals & Lyrics’

When the lead singer of The Doors, Jim Morrison, died in 1971 at age 27, he left behind boxes filled with poetry, journals, and handwritten lyrics of what would become some of the era’s most memorable songs. His sister, Anne Morrison Chewning, has now compiled material from his archive into a new book, “The Collected Works of Jim Morrison.” Correspondent John Blackstone talked with Chewning, and with the two surviving members of The Doors – drummer John Densmore and guitarist Robby Krieger – about Morrison’s impact as a writer and performer.

Poems: Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” As Drawn By Sergio Garcia Sanchez

Sergio García Sánchez is a cartoonist, illustrator and professor at the University of Granada, as well as co-author of the graphic novel “Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure.”

Visualizing Robert Frost’s Seminal Poem
The illustrator Sergio Garcia Sanchez embarks on the road not taken.

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