Category Archives: Podcasts

Morning News: Delta Variant Challenges Asia, Eviction Delays & Jobs

A.M. Edition for Aug. 4. WSJ’s Jon Emont discusses what’s behind the economic challenges facing some parts of Asia amid a rise in the highly transmissible Delta variant of Covid-19. 

The Biden administration implements a new federal moratorium on evictions. Spirit Airlines cancels more flights as it grapples with a dayslong operational meltdown. And, things to consider before quitting your job. 

Morning News: Taliban Surge In Afghanistan, Singapore & Chewing Gum

Sweeping rural gains made as American forces have slipped out are now giving way to bids for urban areas; an enormous, symbolic victory for the insurgents looms. 

Singapore has enjoyed relative racial harmony for decades, but shocking recent events have revealed persistent inequalities. And why chewing gum has lost its cool.

World Affairs: Emerging Markets Growth, Tunisia Turmoil, Ireland Dry Bars

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: growth in emerging markets, Tunisia faces a constitutional crisis (9:53) and dry bars of Ireland (16:03)

Neuroscience: Ardem Patapoutian On Human Sense Of Touch (Podcast)

Morning News: Looming U.S. Foreclosures, Dutch Slavery Exhibit, Marmite

America’s pandemic-driven measures granting relief on mortgages and rent arrears will soon expire, and millions of people are in danger of losing their homes. 

 The Netherlands’ history of slavery is often overlooked; a new exhibition goes to great lengths to confront it. And how Marmite’s love-it-or-hate-it reputation represents an unlikely marketing coup.

Science: Metabolic Health Markers & Obesity, Type 1 Diabetes, “Bone Rooms”

First this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the paradox of metabolically healthy obesity. They chat about the latest research into the relationships between markers of metabolic health—such as glucose or cholesterol levels in the blood—and obesity. They aren’t as tied as you might think.

Next, Colin Dayan, professor of clinical diabetes and metabolism at Cardiff University and senior clinical researcher at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, joins Sarah to discuss his contribution to a special issue on type 1 diabetes. In his review, Colin and colleagues lay out research into how type 1 diabetes can be detected early, delayed, and maybe even one day prevented. Finally, in the first of a six-patrt series of book interviews on race and science, guest host Angela Saini talks with author and professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Samuel Redman, about his book Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums. The two discuss the legacy of human bone collecting and racism in museums today. 

Morning News: Balkans Travel, China Nuclear Arsenal, U.S. Travel Ban

We discuss the creation of a “mini-Schengen” common-travel area in the Balkans. Plus: we analyse what the expansion of China’s nuclear arsenal means for the rest of the world and why the US is persevering with its travel ban on most foreign citizens.