Tag Archives: History

Ancient Architecture: ‘Temple Of Purtunus’ In Rome, Italy (4K Video)

The Temple of Portunus or Temple of Fortuna Virilis is a Roman temple in Rome, Italy, one of the best preserved of all Roman temples. Its dedication remains unclear, as ancient sources mention several temples in this area of Rome, without saying enough to make it clear which this is.

Train Travel: ‘Kyushu – Southern Japan’ (Video)

Kyushu is said to be the wellspring of Japanese civilization. Yet few tourists visit the southernmost of Japan’s main islands. This documentary contrasts modern Japanese cities with traditional customs in the countryside.

The rail journey begins in Fukuoka – a city with a metro population of 2.5 million – and ends at the southern tip of the island, in the city of Ibusuki. As the train rolls along, it travels through time – and reveals the amazing diversity and contrasts of the most southerly of Japan’s four main islands. The trip provides spectacular landscape views, as well as deep insight into a foreign culture, and its ancient traditions and modern lifestyles. In the West, Kyushu is one of the lesser-known regions in the “Land of the Rising Sun.”

Even for the Japanese, the green, mountainous island is seen mostly as a holiday spot. Europeans rarely visit this part of the country – but there are plenty of restaurants and cafes that have names like “Wolfgang,” “Bavaria,” or “Côte d’Azur.” Travel guides say that these words sound “European” to Japanese.

The family of the emperor, or Tenno, comes from Kyushu as well. This is also where the dynasties of the proud warrior class, the samurai, have their roots. And there are a number of active volcanoes on Kyushu. One of the most famous is Mount Aso. Its caldera – the cauldron-like hollow at the top — has a circumference of about 120 kilometers.

Tours: ‘Museum Of The Great Plains’ In Oklahoma

Experience a visual history of the life and people of the Great Plains on display at the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton. From 11,000 years ago to a strong focus on Lawton and southwest Oklahoma and the southern plains in particular. Through all the interactive exhibits, one can not only learn about the fascinating history but also have fun. From life on the cattle trail to Native American artifacts and exhibits, you can immerse yourself in the culture of this special area in the state.

Walking Tour: ‘American Revolution Landmarks In New York City’ (Video)

New York City LIVE: Downtown Manhattan in the American Revolution with Karen Q’s Patriot Tours.

Karen Q is a Revolutionary War and Founding Era historian. She is the author of Theodosia Burr: Teen Witness to the Founding of a New Nation, 21st Century Imprints, Lerner Books. She also appears in area Revolutionary War reenactments as “Mrs. Q”. Karen is a regular cast member of the Travel Channel’s *Mysteries at the Museum* and has appeared on more than twenty episodes. You can see a full list of episodes here.

Asia: An Economic History Of Thailand (Video)

The Thai economy is the second largest in southeast asia. Being right in the centre of one of the most vibrant economic clusters on the planet. Famous for its sun, sea and sand, Thailand is so much than just a tourist hot spot. Thailand’s Economy went on an incredible growth run during the second half of the 20th century. However, economic growth has slowed since the 2000’s, leading some to suggest Thailand’s economy is stuck in a middle income trap. What are the factors behind this in Thailand’s case? How did rice pledging impact the economy? And why Thailand pinning its’ economic hopes on the Eastern Economic Corridor?

Travel In The Cotswolds: ‘Minchinhampton’ (Video)

Minchinhampton is a Cotswold village on the western side of the Cotswolds, near Stroud. Its ancient 580 acre common offers far reaching views across the severn estuary and into Wales. This classic English village is well worth a visit for any Cotswold traveller.

Europe: ‘An Economic History Of Poland’ (Video)

The Polish economy was the fastest growing European economy over the last two decades, being the only one to avoid a recession following 2008. Outperforming other post communist nations, to become the first to reach developed status. However it’s fair to say that Poland often receives less attention than it deserves. Despite regularly being touted as Europe’s growth engine. This raises all sorts of questions, like how has Poland’s Economy done so well? Why do under 26 year olds pay less income tax and whether, as some have suggested, it can catch up with Germany’s average income by 2040. Is Poland a Tiger Economy?

Poland, officially the Republic of Poland, is a country located in Central Europe. It is divided into 16 administrative provinces, covering an area of 312,696 square kilometres, and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. 

Cocktails With A Curator: Meissen “Swan Service”

This week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator” is a story of creation and destruction. Join Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon as he examines two pieces of the legendary Meissen “Swan Service,” which was all but destroyed during World War II when Russian soldiers ransacked a palace in the Polish village of Brody. This opulent set of dishes was given by Augustus III, King of Poland, to the statesman Heinrich von Brühl, who helped engineer Augustus’s ascent to the throne in 1734. Originally comprised of 2,200 intricately designed pieces, only about 100 pieces survive. This week’s complementary cocktail is a spiked hot chocolate.

Meissen porcelain or Meissen china was the first European hard-paste porcelain. Early experiments were done in 1708 by Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus.

To view these objects in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/swanmeissen

Travel Journeys: ‘Ashio, Japan’ – Return To Forests

Dig deeper into the story of Ashio, a former mining town in Tochigi Prefecture that’s returning to nature with the passage of time and contributions of hard-working residents.

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The Ashio Copper Mine (足尾銅山, Ashio Dōzan) was a copper mine located in the town of Ashio, Tochigi, (now part of the city of Nikkō, Tochigi), in the northern Kantō region of Japan. It was significant as the site of Japan’s first major pollution disaster in the 1880s and the scene of the 1907 miners riots. The pollution disaster led to the birth of the Japanese environmental movement and the 1897 Third Mine Pollution Prevention Order. The pollution incident also triggered changes in the mine’s operations that played a role in the 1907 riots, which became part of a string of mining disputes in 1907. During World War Two the mine was worked by POW forced labour.