Tag Archives: History

History: Mahatma Gandhi Assassination At 75 Years

DW News – 75 years ago today, Mahatma Gandhi, who led the campaign for India’s independence, was assassinated in Delhi. The former lawyer is often called the “Father of the Nation” and credited with leading a non-violent struggle for independence from British rule.

Gandhi wanted an independent, peaceful India that protected religious freedom. But that was challenged by growing Muslim and Hindu nationalism. In 1947, India gained independence from the British, but at the cost of Partition – Muslim majority Pakistan and Hindu majority but secular India, came into being. Religous riots followed and Gandhi went on hunger strike to oppose the violence.

On January 30th, 1948, he was assassinated by a Hindu nationalist who believed Gandhi had been too accommodating to Muslims during the Partition. Around a million people turned out for his funeral. That was in 1948. But the India of 2023 is rather different. Hindu nationalism has been emboldened by Prime Minister Narendra Modi – leaving Gandhi’s legacy in tatters, as DW Correspondent Manira Chaudhary finds out.

Architectural History: New York City Subways From 1904 To 2017 (AD)

Architectural Digest – Today Michael Wyetzner of Michielli + Wyetzner Architects returns to Architectural Digest to explore the history of New York City’s storied subway system, breaking down the architectural and design details found in some of its oldest and newest stations.

Design: Costume History Behind ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical’ (V&A Museum)

Victoria and Albert Museum (January 24, 2023) – Moulin Rouge! The Musical is a spectacle of romance and cabaret, set in the heart of Paris’ bohemian scene during the Belle Époque era. Bringing Baz Luhrmann’s landmark film to life on stage, the production is a musical mash-up extravaganza, immersing you in a world of splendour and glory.

Video timeline: 00:00 Catherine Zuber’s design process 0:29 What is Moulin Rouge! The Musical? 00:49 Was the Moulin Rouge real? 01:05 Adapting Baz Luhrmann’s film 01:23 Creating a costume for Satine – design sketches 02:17 Researching the history of showgirls 02:49 How does the costume work? 03:53 Designing costumes for theatre 04:12 Mounting and installing the costume in the Re:Imagining Musicals display

Join Costume Designer Catherine Zuber and Curator Harriet Reed as they take us behind the scenes, introducing the real Moulin Rouge and showgirls of the time, showing the original design sketches for Satine’s dazzling diamond studded costume, and demonstrating how one vital mechanism is crucial for the piece’s quick change on stage.

The costume is now in the V&A’s collection of Theatre and Performance and can be seen as part of the Re:Imagining Musicals display until November 2023.

Arts & Culture: The New Criterion – February 2023

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The New Criterion – February 2023 Issue:

Caesar & the republic  by Adrian Goldsworthy
Otto von Habsburg’s legacy  by Edwin J. Feulner
Garshin: a genius at suffering  by Gary Saul Morson
Saarinen & starchitecture  by Michael J. Lewis


New poems  by Rachel Hadas, Ryan Wilson & Duncan Wu

Taiwan Views: Democracy And The Digital World

DW Documentary (January 20, 2023) – For Taiwanese Minister of Digital Affairs Audrey Tang, democracy is itself a technology. This film shines a light on Taiwan’s political history, as well as the country’s contemporary experience of democracy. Taiwan deployed innovative technologies in the battle against Covid-19.

Minister of Digital Affairs Audrey Tang worked with the tech community and civil society to successfully stem the spread of the virus. This was partly due to citizens’ direct involvement in the solving of political problems. Taiwan is rethinking democracy. Digital applications and new technologies are having a democratizing impact.

A look back at Taiwan’s recent history makes it clear how the World Wide Web plays a crucial role in the fight for democracy. The documentary also focuses on Taiwan’s desire for national sovereignty and civil rights. It also considers the threat posed by China, which views the democratic island of Taiwan as part of the People’s Republic and is pursuing plans to annex the territory.

Previews: History Today Magazine – February 2023

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History Today Magazine – February 2023 issue:

Secrets of the Silk Road

Silk Road

The discovery of a cave full of manuscripts on the edge of the Gobi Desert reveals the details of everyday life on the Silk Road.

Heirs and Spares

It was not easy to be the second son. The younger brothers of the French kings could choose either to rebel or reconcile, but neither option was straightforward.

The Nazi Spider in the Spanish Press

Francisco Franco with Adolf Hitler, 1940.

Hans Josef Lazar pulled the strings of Hitler’s propaganda in wartime Spain. Then he disappeared. Who was he?

Egypt Culture: A Look At 5 Ancient Craft Traditions

Insider Business – A traditional dyehouse, Fez hats and a thousand-year-old ancient hieroglyphs carving method have nearly disappeared in Egypt in recent decades. But five artisans are determined to keep their traditions alive. Here’s how they do it.

Video timeline: 00:00 Introduction 00:46 Tiles 07:13 Fez 14:40 Papyrus 22:13 Dyehouse 27:27 Stone Carving

Preview: The Smithsonian Magazine – Jan/Feb 2023

Smithsonian Magazine (Digital) Subscription Discount - DiscountMags.com

Smithsonian Magazine – January/February 2023:

The Misunderstood Roman Empress Who Willed Her Way to the Top

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A fresh view of Galla Placidia, who married a barbarian and ruled when the world power fell into chaos

Mesoamericans Have Been Using a 260-Day Ceremonial Calendar for Millennia

New research has the earliest evidence yet of when the timekeeping guide was used to mark the seasons

A New Discovery Puts Panama as the Site of the First Successful Slave Rebellion

Deep in the archives, a historian rescues the tale of brave maroons

Architecture: History Of Chrysler Building In NYC

Today Michael Wyetzner of Michielli + Wyetzner Architects returns to Architectural Digest for a deep, detail-oriented break down of New York City’s singular Chrysler Building. From its unmistakable Art Deco design to the hidden details that echo its automotive inspiration, see why the Chrysler Building is an iconic staple of the Manhattan skyline.

HISTORY

The story of the Chrysler Building began in 1928, when automotive titan Walter P. Chrysler, founder of Chrysler Corporation, bought the property from Coney Island developer William H. Reynolds for $2 million. Chrysler hired architect William Van Alen, who had previously designed a skyscraper for Reynolds on the site, to create the world’s tallest tower. Construction on Chrysler’s project began in 1929 and was completed in 1930. Reaching a height of 1,048 feet, including its 125-foot steel spire, the Chrysler Building surpassed the Woolworth Building and 40 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan in a “Race to the Sky” to claim the tallest building in the world–a title it held until 1931. The Chrysler Building still reigns as the world’s most famous skyscraper, playing prominent roles in film and television from Godzilla and Spider-Man to Sex and the City.