Category Archives: Culture

Island Views: Skiathos & Skopelos – Greece (Video)

Skiathos, a Greek island in the northwest Aegean Sea, is part of the Sporades archipelago. It’s best known for its beaches and buzzing, youth-driven nightlife scene. The action centers around Skiathos Town, where bars and restaurants spill onto sidewalks along the old harbor and Papadiamanti street, the main pedestrian thoroughfare. Between town and the airport are many open-air, waterfront clubs.

Skopelos is a Greek island in the western Aegean Sea. Skopelos is one of several islands which comprise the Northern Sporades island group, which lies east of the Pelion peninsula on the mainland and north of the island of Euboea. It is part of the Thessaly region.

Views: Ancient Mongolian Fishing Technique At Lake Chagan, China (Video)

In the northeast province of Jilin, China, local fishermen rely on an ancient Mongolian technique to fish in the frozen waters of Lake Chagan. And despite temperatures reaching minus 30 degrees Fahrenheit, all they need are a net, two horses, and a spindle.

Views: An Afternoon Tea At Greywalls Country House, Scotland (Video)

For today’s episode I am at Greywalls – an Edwardian Country House Hotel in Scotland, for Afternoon Tea. Join me for a tour of the house and garden, followed by Afternoon Tea. At the end of the video I share how to make a delicious lemon & poppyseed cake.

Overlooking Muirfield golf course, this posh hotel in an Edwardian country house dating from 1901 is 2 miles from Dirleton Castle.

Full Scottish breakfast is included. A haute French restaurant includes a whisky room, and a lounge bar offers pub fare and afternoon tea. A 6-acre walled garden features tennis courts, a croquet lawn and a putting green; massages are also available.

Views: Camel Herders Of The Sahara Desert (Video)

It was once common practice to herd camels hundreds of kilometers through the desert. Now, with only a handful of herders left, the ancient art of desert navigation will soon be lost. From the south of Morocco, the great Sahara Desert extends more than a thousand kilometers into Mauritania. Hot and dry, the desert is hostile to life.

Yet for centuries, camel herders have successfully traveled back and forth across this landscape, between their herd’s winter and summer camps. Today, only some thousand families remain dedicated to this traditional way of life. They breed dromedaries: domesticated, one-humped camels. Among these guardians of the old ways are the shepherds Moulay and Hadrami, both of the Oulad Ben Sbaa tribe. Their families live in the city, having abandoned the nomadic life.

But Moulay and Hadrami are passionate shepherds, closely bonded to their 200 camels. In this rich documentary, the men take us along as they go about their work: arming themselves against sandstorms, preparing their herd for nightly migrations, and searching the desert’s endless expanse for lost newborn animals and their mothers. An invaluable glimpse into the hardscrabble existence of these shepherds, the film shows a way of a life that will soon cease to exist.

1970’s Books: ‘Rock Me On The Water’- How Movies, TV & Music Changed Culture

A new book argues the 1970’s was a moment when TV, movies, and music all shifted into a new gear, changing the cultural landscape in ways that continue to today. Jeffrey Brown has a conversation with author Ron Brownstein about his book “Rock Me on the Water: 1974-The Year Los Angeles Transformed Movies, Music, Television, and Politics.” This segment is part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS.

Cultural View: What Will An Independent Scotland Look Like? (Documentary)

What does it mean to be Scottish? Since Brexit, people here at the northernmost end of the island of Great Britain have been asking this question with renewed vigour. Now, with the Scottish Parliament election approaching, many Scots see their future outside of the United Kingdom. So how do ordinary Scottish citizens see their homeland?

On her journey through Scotland, journalist Diana Zimmermann quickly learns that it is impossible to travel through the country these days without talking about Brexit. Geography and history have brought the Scots to a breaking point. Just ask Sophie Gault, a deer-hunter whose breath-taking workplace is in the heart of the Highlands, at the foot of Ben Alder. “Being Scottish is something I’m really proud of,” says Gault, adding that taking this job was the best decision she ever made.

“Being with nature and with wildlife, it makes you appreciate Scotland even more. There’s always that sense of community. And I’m very proud of our own Scottish humour.” What does fisherman Victor Laurenson, who had hoped Brexit would bring him better fishing conditions, think of his country now?

Janey Godley, a comedian from Glasgow, brings yet another perspective: In the Scottish independence referendum in 2014, she says, the English told the Scots to vote against independence so that Scotland could stay in the EU. “It’s basically like your Mum and Dad saying – look – if you go to bed early, when you wake up, you will have a pony. And you go to bed, you sleep early, you wake up and there’s just a cushion in the shape of a cat instead, and it’s not even a good cat.”

History: Bicentenary Of Napoleon Bonaparte Debated In France (Video)

This week, you find us outside #Paris​’ military museum, the #Invalides​. It is the final resting place of one of France’s most famous and most controversial figures, #Napoleon#Bonaparte​. As 2021 marks the bicentenary of the emperor’s death, his military, social and political legacy have sparked a heated debate, both here and abroad… proving a pickle for the government’s commemorative plans. We take a look back at this multi-faceted leader.

Islands: The Unknown Rural Side Of Santorini

Santorini is one of the Cyclades islands in the Aegean Sea. It was devastated by a volcanic eruption in the 16th century BC, forever shaping its rugged landscape. The whitewashed, cubiform houses of its 2 principal towns, Fira and Oia, cling to cliffs above an underwater caldera (crater). They overlook the sea, small islands to the west and beaches made up of black, red and white lava pebble.

Julia’s journey brings her to the glamorous island of Santorini, where she discovers how one of the Aegean’s poorest islands became a playground for the rich and famous.

Documentary: What Is The Future For Algeria (Video)

Since February 2019, millions of Algerians have demonstrated against the government. They first took to the streets to demand more democracy and protest the renewed candidacy of former authoritarian president Abdelaziz Bouteflika. The COVID-19 pandemic may have brought the Algerian protest movement “Hirak” to a premature end in March 2020, and even though Bouteflika withdrew his candidacy, its demands are still far from being met. Opponents of the government still say their country is a long way from genuine democracy and is at the same time plagued by corruption, economic mismanagement and military interference in politics.

This documentary follows five young Algerians who are all taking part in the protests. They tell viewers why they are challenging Algeria’s powerful elites and describe what they want for their country. Their stories are about hope and resignation, as well as the open question of their futures in Algeria.