Tag Archives: Design

Profile: ‘Luminist’ Designs Of Architect Steven Holl

CBS Sunday Morning (January 29, 2023) – The works of architect Steven Holl have helped define the look of cities around the world, making remarkable use of light and space.

Correspondent Rita Braver talks with Holl, whose recent works include the REACH at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in Washington, D.C., and the Kinder Building at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston – buildings in which Holl hopes to express “the joy from the creative act.”

Steven Holl is a tenured Professor of Architecture who has taught at Columbia GSAPP since 1981. After completing architecture studies in Rome in 1970, the University of Washington in 1971, and graduate studies at London’s Architectural Association in 1976, Holl founded Steven Holl Architects in 1977. Based in New York City, the forty person firm also has an office in Beijing.

Steven Holl has realized cultural, civic, academic and residential projects both in the United States and internationally including the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki, Finland (1998); the Chapel of St. Ignatius, Seattle, Washington (1997); Simmons Hall at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts (2002); the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri (2007); the Horizontal Skyscraper in Shenzhen, China (2009); the Linked Hybrid mixed-use complex in Beijing, China (2009); Cité de l’Océan et du Surf in Biarritz, France (2011); the Reid Building at the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland (2014); the Arts Building West and the Visual Arts Building at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa (2006, 2016); the Ex of IN House (2016); the Lewis Arts Complex at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey (2017); Maggie’s Centre Barts in London (2017); the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University (2018); and the Glassell School of Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2018). Upcoming work includes the REACH expansion of the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. (2019); the Winter Visual Arts Center at Franklin & Marshall College (2019); Rubenstein Commons at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (2019); and the expansion of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2020).

Design: Costume History Behind ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical’ (V&A Museum)

Victoria and Albert Museum (January 24, 2023) – Moulin Rouge! The Musical is a spectacle of romance and cabaret, set in the heart of Paris’ bohemian scene during the Belle Époque era. Bringing Baz Luhrmann’s landmark film to life on stage, the production is a musical mash-up extravaganza, immersing you in a world of splendour and glory.

Video timeline: 00:00 Catherine Zuber’s design process 0:29 What is Moulin Rouge! The Musical? 00:49 Was the Moulin Rouge real? 01:05 Adapting Baz Luhrmann’s film 01:23 Creating a costume for Satine – design sketches 02:17 Researching the history of showgirls 02:49 How does the costume work? 03:53 Designing costumes for theatre 04:12 Mounting and installing the costume in the Re:Imagining Musicals display

Join Costume Designer Catherine Zuber and Curator Harriet Reed as they take us behind the scenes, introducing the real Moulin Rouge and showgirls of the time, showing the original design sketches for Satine’s dazzling diamond studded costume, and demonstrating how one vital mechanism is crucial for the piece’s quick change on stage.

The costume is now in the V&A’s collection of Theatre and Performance and can be seen as part of the Re:Imagining Musicals display until November 2023.

Culture/Society: Monocle Magazine – February 2023

Issue 160 - Monocle - Print - Shop | Monocle

Monocle FilmsMonocle’s February 2023 issue is all about celebrating places that work, whether that’s a parliament, home or metro carriage. From a floating office to a school teaching children the rules of the road, we profile the locations that look good and work well for those who use them. Plus: Charleston’s hospitality boom and why you should learn Russian.

Design: ‘3 Scenes of Home’ – A Rotating Micro-Cabin

3 scenes of home: this micro-cabin  by Studio Supra-Simplicities theatrically rotates to optimize flexibility of living
The three scenes of the home | all images by Studio Supra-Simplicities

designboom (January 20, 2023) – In a swiftly rotating display, this micro-scale cabin shifts its program on its axis to integrate three different ‘scenes’ of living on one small platform. Studio Supra-Simplicities conceptualizes ‘3 Scenes of Home’ to compactly integrate spaces for sleeping, dining, and washing into one mechanism that marks a sophisticated integration between the typical house program and the theatrical function of a stage.

a house with scene changing system to optimize flexibility of living 10topped with a rainwater harvesting system

a house with scene changing system to optimize flexibility of living 6

project info:

Removing the need for unnecessary circulation spaces and infusing a distinctive dynamic character, the structure maximizes its internal mobility and flexibility of living, while sitting with a micro footprint. It minimizes external impact by covering only a tiny parcel on the natural landscape, and recycling rainwater for daily use through its rooftop harvesting system.

Architecture: History Of Chrysler Building In NYC

Today Michael Wyetzner of Michielli + Wyetzner Architects returns to Architectural Digest for a deep, detail-oriented break down of New York City’s singular Chrysler Building. From its unmistakable Art Deco design to the hidden details that echo its automotive inspiration, see why the Chrysler Building is an iconic staple of the Manhattan skyline.

HISTORY

The story of the Chrysler Building began in 1928, when automotive titan Walter P. Chrysler, founder of Chrysler Corporation, bought the property from Coney Island developer William H. Reynolds for $2 million. Chrysler hired architect William Van Alen, who had previously designed a skyscraper for Reynolds on the site, to create the world’s tallest tower. Construction on Chrysler’s project began in 1929 and was completed in 1930. Reaching a height of 1,048 feet, including its 125-foot steel spire, the Chrysler Building surpassed the Woolworth Building and 40 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan in a “Race to the Sky” to claim the tallest building in the world–a title it held until 1931. The Chrysler Building still reigns as the world’s most famous skyscraper, playing prominent roles in film and television from Godzilla and Spider-Man to Sex and the City.

AI & Design: ‘Synthetic Architectural Dreams’

'synthetic architectural dreams' explores the revolutionary future of AI-generated design

designboom – Over the past year, the field of design has seen a dramatic shift with artists and architects alike increasingly adapting innovative technologies to explore and expand the bounds of their creative practices.

'synthetic architectural dreams' explores the revolutionary future of AI-generated designillustrative capabilities of AI-powered design programs

Perhaps the most sensational innovation has been the wave of AI-powered design programs, kicking off with DALL-E which quickly consolidated its place in the framework of popular culture, taken further by Midjourney from which a blurred but exciting reality emerged, to Stable Diffusion which moreover has made this work open source.

Read more:

syntheticarchitecture

Top 2022 Architecture: The ‘Blade’ Residences In Canobbio, Switzerland

Mino Caggiula architectsThe inspiration for the project came after experiencing the works of Richard Serra, an American artist known for using metal blades to create his works of art that can be defined as Landmark.

The architectural intervention is daring and aims at a harmonious connection with the surrounding space and landscape, without spoiling it; throughout plays of tension with shapes and insertion into the vegetation. In order to reach this goal, curved weathering steel blades are positioned so that, in perspective, they go beyond the woods in the south and direct the units and the view towards the lake. The radius of curvature is measured so that the sagitta of the chord of the circle doesn’t exceed 1 mm per linear metre, making thus the interiors furnishable and going back to a human scale, just like the dualism produced by Richard Serra’s sculptures.

Because of the steepness, we created two different blocks in order to further guarantee the view of the lake to the properties, divided by a system of main and secondary blades to create an internal and subordinate subdivision of the units. The insertion of the vegetation was inspired by New York’s High Line which scratches the pavement just like the blades do. This logic was transposed into our project both horizontally and vertically, thus the blades represent at the same time both a boundary and a bridge.

Christmas 2022 Views: A Design Tour Of A 17th Century Palazzo In Venice

House & Garden (December 16, 2022) – Cook and author Skye McAlpine welcomes us into her 4,000 square-foot Italian apartment — part of the 17th-century Palazzo Gradenigo — just off the Grand Canal in Venice. Layered in history,

Video timeline: 00:00 – Inspiration: “It’s imperfect perfection” 02:00 – Living Room: “It’s where the real Christmas moment happens!” 05:20 – Kitchen: “I love the way that food brings people together” 07:50 – Breakfast Room: “It feels like a chocolate box…” 08:53 – Dining Room: “It feels very ramshackle”

Skye McAlpine’s Venetian sanctuary maintains plenty of the palazzo’s original details, such as the 18th-century fresco in the living room and the decorative flowering of rocaille in the breakfast room. As we’re guided into the light and airy kitchen that is set apart by its high-beamed ceilings, Skye McAlpine reveals a staple festive treat… a snowy panettone cake from her cookbook ‘A Table For Friends’. In the grand dining room, Skye’s dinner table is layered with a mixture of small plates over larger plates from her ‘Tavola’ tableware collection, which is inspired by ‘la dolce vita’ or ‘the sweet life’. The snowy panettone takes centre stage as it is served on a cake stand which towers above the rest of the festive treats, to complete her “over-the-top” Christmas table.

“Life is slower here. It’s unchanged, it’s like a time capsule,” McAlpine explains as she contrasts between her life in London and the Venetian way of living. “I think that’s part of the charm, it really is like stepping back into a different era”. Watch the full episode of Design Notes with Skye McAlpine, as we tour her slice of an Italian palace that is expertly decorated for the Christmas holidays.

READ MORE

Urban Views: World’s Best Public Housing In Vienna

Monocle Films (December 14, 2022) – The world is urbanising fast. But how do you accommodate people in cities in a way that offers dignity, affordability and a sense of community? Vienna may have a solution. Explore the enduring legacy of the city’s ‘Gemeindebau’ apartment blocks in the latest episode of our Design Tours series.

Tours: Cascade House In Queensland, Australia

The Local Project (December 13, 2022) – Designed to feel like one is living in a garden, Cascade House by John Ellway seamlessly blends outdoor and indoor living. Located in Queensland, the family home of interior designer, stylist and client Jacqueline Kaytar is a traditional cottage home that was in dire need of repair.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Garden Home 00:26 – The Inner-City Location 01:14 – An Overview of the Home 01:49 – A Walkthrough of the Home 02:28 – The Key Brief of Garden Connection 02:50 – Original Timber Cottages 03:18 – Separation of Old and New 03:53 – The Kitchen 04:11 – A Seamless Integration of Fisher & Paykel 04:44 – The Fisher & Paykel Fit 05:16 – Key Materials 05:59 – A Connection of Texture and Detail 06:22 – The Connection Between Owner and Architect 06:59 – Proud Moments

Working closely with Jacqueline, the architect avoided building underneath the home to keep the streetscape intact. Instead, John Ellway used the vacant land to the side of the original cottage to provide a much-needed extension that leans into the cascading landscape of the site. Found by the client, the cottage home was in a dilapidated state, though internally and structurally the house was in good condition with a much-needed update to accommodate the contemporary needs of the family.

After bringing John Ellway on board, Jacqueline expressed an aspiration to instil a feeling like that of living in a garden. Beginning the house tour from the parking area, the entry to the home opens to the kitchen, dining and living spaces. Immediately connecting to the gardens through large glass doors and windows, the house opens up onto a grass patch for the family to enjoy. Providing the space to embrace living in a garden, the grass patch also offers a private outdoor reprieve. Connecting the new extensions with the older parts of the cottage, a breezeway also adds another layer of connection to the garden.

The private rooms sit in the old section of the cottage, with the entertainment spaces confined to the new extensions. The home’s extended veranda instils the experience of living in a garden as occupants step into the new volume. Incorporating seamless connections throughout the architecture, John Ellway has made additional interior design choices in the kitchen, adding nooks and crannies to conceal appliances and ensuring the interior architecture is kept sleek and simple.

In the kitchen, Fisher & Paykel’s integrated appliances seamlessly blend into the joinery, providing a cohesive effect. Aside from aligning with budget and aesthetic desires, John Ellway used Fisher & Paykel to coincide with the broader context of the kitchen. Focused on using key materials to further assist with the idea of living in a garden, the client and architect chose plywood, brass countertops and polished concrete to foster a warm and natural connection. Together, John Ellway and Jacqueline work to combine finishes and textures to create an uplifted and refreshing home.