Tag Archives: Design

Innovative Homeware: The Noori “Rocket Stove” BBQ Fuses “Design & Ecology”

From a Dezeen.com online review article:

Noori StovesThe creators of Noori based the product on the traditional rocket stove design, which burns small-diameter wood fuel in a combustion chamber linked to an insulated vertical chimney.

It was developed by three friends who studied together on the Permaculture Design Course at the IPEMA university in Ubatuba, Brazil. Permaculture focuses on working with, rather than against nature, with the goal of integrating design and ecology.

Brazilian brand Noori aims to transport users to a time when “cooking with fire was at the core of our rituals” with its multipurpose stove, which can be used as a barbecue, a pizza oven or a fire pit.

The Noori stove comprises a curved body made from heat-resistant refractory concrete that is split into two sections. Within the stove an L-shaped enamelled pipe contains the fuel and directs heat up through the centre of the stove towards a grill surface.

To read more: https://www.dezeen.com/2019/09/28/noori-stove-modular-design-multipurpose-burner-barbecue/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Dezeen%20Weekly%20641&utm_content=Dezeen%20Weekly%20641+CID_618a7d7ae18dedf9c7d7ca66b31d52c6&utm_source=Dezeen%20Mail&utm_term=Read%20more

Top Tiny Homes: Little Byron Unveils “Ingenious Living And Sleeping Area” With Open Air Bar

From an Inhabit.com online article:

The stunning time home on wheels was built for one of Little Bryon’s clients who was looking to have a guest home on their property for visitors, but ultimately had plans to move into the beautiful space down the road when her children left the nest.

Byron Bay-based tiny home builders, Little Byron, have unveiled a gorgeous tiny home design that not only has an ingenious living and sleeping area, but also includes an open air bar area. The Banjo tiny home is just 23 feet long and 8 feet wide, but its breathtaking, space-efficient design makes it seems so much bigger.

Little Byron Tiny House Interior

The tiny home is a beautiful design that pays homage to typical tiny home practicality, namely natural light. The home is built with an abundance of windows that really open up the space, creating a vibrant, healthy interior space. Not only are there large operable windows in just about every corner of the home, including the bedrooms and bathroom, but there is a massive window in the middle of the living space that opens outward.

To read more: https://inhabitat.com/stunning-boho-style-tiny-house-comes-with-open-air-bar/

Future Of Camping: The BMW – North Face “Futurelight” Camper

From a BMWGroupDesignworks.com webpage:

BMW Futurelight Camper sideviewThe camper is a light, mobile dome made of FUTURELIGHT™ material and heavy-duty geometry. As the fabric stretches over a geodesic dome, it creates a natural, weather-proof space. Somewhere to sleep after a day of hiking, or a place to take cover when nature is being, well, nature.

The camper is crafted on top of a highly-mobile platform, providing a comfortable cave for two people. The interior includes camping essentials, such as a bed and table, while still providing the feeling of a free space in nature due to its dome structure.

To read more:

https://www.bmwgroupdesignworks.com/case_studies/the-north-face-camper/

https://www.designboom.com/technology/bmw-the-north-face-futurelight-camper-ces-01-09-2019/?utm_source=designboom+daily+-+sunday+edition&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=BMW+and+the

Top Designers: Jacob Brillhart’s “Travel Drawings” Seek To Find “Persistencies” In Physical And Living Architecture

Brillhart Architecture Travel Drawings 3TRAVEL DRAWINGS

The office engages in a hybrid design process that is directed by analog forms of representation and digital production techniques. Each project is explored using a matrix of different media lenses, including painting, hand drawing, physical models and mock-ups as well as cad, hyper-photorealistic renderings and 3D computer models, wherein application and implication are prioritized. We believe this fusing of media provides a larger, more creative palette from which to work. Travel drawing also serves as a platform of inspiration and a fundamental aspect of research and development.

Voyage Le Corbusier Jacob BrilhartThis approach stems from my own formal education and the unique 10-year period in contemporary history in which I studied architecture. Occupying both “paper” and virtual / digital environments, I learned the fundamentals at Tulane University using purely traditional architectural methods of representation. By the time I earned my Masters from Columbia University, the pedagogy had radically changed, wherein the old, analog systems of production were abandoned for a purely paperless studio that solely engaged digital technologies such as Maya, Max and Photoshop. Working within both territories, I learned that each medium has a profound effect on the way in which we draw, design and understand architectural space and form.

Meanwhile, after leaving Columbia, I set out to rediscover the practice of drawing on the road and have since made over 800 paintings, sketches and notes of architectural details, buildings, cityscapes, art and culture. These personal “drawings on the road” have evoked an intensive physical and living architectural investigation of how I process and perceive information. In the authentic and active experience of drawing — of physically recording what we see — I believe we develop a new way of seeing. We bring back sketchbooks that are full of information and analysis as well as a better understanding of architectural persistencies that make what we see matter. This level of engagement furthers the architect’s artistic intuition and enables him or her to see anew.

Website: https://brillhartarchitecture.com/academic-2/

Future Of Hotel Design: “Modular AC Hotel Nomad” From Danny Forster & Architecture

From a RadicalInnovationAward.com release:

Danny Forster & Architects Nomad Design SideThis Volumetric High-Rise Modular Hotel will be the world’s tallest modular hotel and one of the most stylish, combining modular efficiency with architectural flair. AC by Marriott at 842 6th Avenue, New York City, will be the tallest modular hotel in the world when it opens in early 2020. But it won’t just be a step up for modular design, it will be a step forward. The building leverages the advantages of modular construction, uses cutting-edge proprietary technology to address potential drawbacks, and, most importantly, put to rest the idea that a modular building can only be the sum of its factory-made parts.

It’s stylish and architecturally expressive. The perfect marriage of modular construction and inventive architectural design, this Manhattan AC points the way to the future by using accelerated design processes through VR software and off-site quality control to streamline the building process for builders anywhere in the world. DF&A and its tech partner patented a “Time Machine” technology that trains 3D cameras on each module at five different points in the construction process, so that clients, contractors, and architects can keep an eye on what’s being built.

European Landmarks: Estonian Haapsalu Episcopal Castle Gets Spectacular Renovation By Kaos Architects

From a DesignBoom.com online article:

haapsalu episcopal castle design conversion by Kaos Architects entrythe long and colourful history of haapsalu episcopal castle began when it was built in the 13th century, but since the 17th century the main castle has been in ruins. kaos architects‘ conservation and renovation has resulted in a journey along the walls and within the castle. the renovated castle invites guests to admire the castle’s structure closer and view the picturesque town of haapsalu from an unusually high vantage point. the guests now experience the medieval environment from another level. 

Consumer Issues: Many Products Designed For Older People Are Just “Brown, Beige And Boring”

From a MIT Technology Review online article:

Engaging older people in designing for older people “is a good thing,” says Smith. “Because younger people do tend to have this picture of designing things that are functional for older people, but not really understanding what makes them happy.” Presented with products that are “brown, beige, and boring,” many older people will forgo convenience for dignity.

MIT Technology Review why are products for older people so uglyIt’s a familiar tune to engineer Ken Smith, director of the mobility division of the Stanford Center on Longevity. He says one of the biggest mistakes designers make is to assume that around the age of 60 people lose interest in aesthetics and design. This can have dire consequences for products meant to help people with their health. No one wants to stick a golf-ball-size hearing aid the color of chewed gum in their ear, any more than they want to wear a T-shirt that reads “SENIOR CITIZEN.”

To read more click on the following link: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614167/why-are-products-for-older-people-so-ugly/?utm_campaign=the_download.unpaid.engagement&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=76169117&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_dlTg24O7Cr_1b5J4cniKFvi74Dmh8Fm3nuJVTbblAB8Z3fna_Rj6WoV6M6aodqOVSJnh603-liOHFgjAr_EQEh9sVQw&_hsmi=76169117