Tag Archives: News

News: Top 5 Headlines For April 16, 2021 (Reuters)

Five stories to know for April 16: The Indianapolis FedEx shooting, Chicago police body camera video of Adam Toledo shooting, Derek Chauvin 5th amendment, Biden meets Japan’s Suga and Jimmy Lai gets 14 month prison sentence.

1. A gunman opened fire at an Indianapolis Fedex. The mass shooting left eight people dead and several others injured. The gunman took his own life, police said.

2. Chicago releases body camera footage of police shooting Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old boy. Toledo appeared to be raising his hands in an alley more than two weeks ago. The nine-minute video from officer Eric Stillman’s body camera showed showed Stillman yelling “Stop” to Toledo before he caught up to him and ordered him to show his hands. Toledo appeared to raise his hands right before Stillman fired one shot and then ran to the boy as he fell to the ground. Following the incident Chicago police department said Adam Toledo had a gun in his hand.

3. Former Minneapolis policeman Derek Chauvin waived his right to testify to the jury about his part in the deadly arrest of George Floyd . Judge Peter Cahill denied the prosecutor’s request to admit test results as new evidence in the case, saying it was too last-minute in a way that was prejudicial to Chauvin. Cahill warned prosecutors that if a witness even mentioned the existence of the new test results, he would declare a mistrial.

4. President Joe Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga will present a united front on Taiwan, China’s most sensitive territorial issue, in a summit meeting.

5. Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai was sentenced to 14 months in prison while nine other activists received jail time or suspended sentences for taking part in unauthorized assemblies during mass pro-democracy protests in 2019.

Morning News Podcast: Myanmar Coup Protests, Cuba Castro Era Fades

Protests against February’s military coup are only growing, even as the army becomes more murderous. The economy is paralysed. What can be done to put the country back together?

In Cuba, the end of the Castro-family era is nigh; a new leader inherits a cratered economy and an ambitious vaccine-development effort. And some surprising road-fatality statistics from America.

Morning News Podcast: U.S. Housing Market, Russia Sanctions & Luxury Goods

A.M. Edition for April 15. WSJ’s Konrad Putzier discusses global investment in the U.S. housing market. WSJ’s Anna Hirtenstein on the growth of luxury goods. 

The Biden administration is set to punish Russia. Efforts to make band practice safe in the pandemic. Marc Stewart hosts.

Morning News Podcast: Russia’s Military Buildup, U.S. INflation & Flying Taxis

The troops and hardware piling up at the border are probably just posturing. But look closely: Russia’s military is swiftly getting better-equipped and better-trained

Outsized inflation numbers in America are partly a statistical quirk—but also a sign of the tricky balance pandemic-era policymakers must navigate. And why you may soon be getting a lift from a flying taxi

News: Five Top Stories – April 13, 2021 (Video)

Five stories to know for April 13: Protests continue after Minneapolis shooting, Knoxville school shooting, Japan nuclear waste water, Derek Chauvin trial and Russia warns U.S. on Crimea.

1. Minnesota police released body camera footage that shows police officer Kim Potter apparently drawing her gun by mistake, instead of her Taser, when she shot a young Black man, Daunte Wright, to death during a traffic stop. Protests continued overnight in Minneapolis following the incident.

2. A Knoxville school shooting ends with a student shot and killed by police and one officer wounded. Police said the high school student opened fire on them in a campus bathroom, wounding an officer.

3. Prosecutors neared the end of their case in the Derek Chauvin trial. George Floyd’s younger brother Philonise Floyd gave emotional testimony about how his sibling grew up obsessed with basketball and doting on his mother.

4. Japan will release more than 1 million tons of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, the government said, a move China called “extremely irresponsible,” while South Korea summoned Tokyo’s ambassador in Seoul to protest.

5. Russia warned the United States to ensure its warships stayed well away from Crimea “for their own good,” calling their deployment in the Black Sea a provocation designed to test Russian nerves.

Morning News Podcast: Minneapolis Protests, Iran Nuclear Site Explosion

More protests in Minneapolis as details emerge about the killing of yet another black man by a police officer. Iran is promising revenge for an explosion at one of it’s largest nuclear facilities, threatening the future of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal as talks resume.

And, Russia is building up its military presence along the Ukrainian border stoking fears of another invasion.

Morning News Podcast: German Politics, Prince Philip & Kenyan Coffee

As the country wrestles with another covid-19 wave, the battle to succeed Chancellor Angela Merkel is building. We look at the political and epidemiological races.

Prince Philip was a loyal consort to Britain’s queen for seven decades; our correspondent recalls meeting him at a difficult time for the family. And why Kenyans are at last indulging in their own coffee.

Global News: A Worker’s World, Amazon Effect On Sports, Japanese Poetry

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, riding high in a workers’ worldthe Amazon effect on live sport (9:45) and even transience is mutating (17:35).