Tag Archives: Cities

Architectural History: New York City Subways From 1904 To 2017 (AD)

Architectural Digest – Today Michael Wyetzner of Michielli + Wyetzner Architects returns to Architectural Digest to explore the history of New York City’s storied subway system, breaking down the architectural and design details found in some of its oldest and newest stations.

Winter 2023: A Walk In The Snow In Vienna, Austria

Vienna is a city and  Bundesland (federal state), the capital of Austria. Of the country’s nine states, Vienna is the smallest in area but the largest in population.

Modern Vienna has undergone several historical incarnations. From 1558 to 1918 it was an imperial city—until 1806 the seat of the Holy Roman Empire and then the capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. In 1918 it became the capital of the truncated, landlocked central European country that emerged from World War I as a republic. From 1938 to 1945 Austria was a part of Adolf Hitler’s “Greater” Germany, and Vienna became “Greater” Vienna, reflecting the Nazi revision of the city limits.

In the decade following World War II, Austria was occupied by British, French, American, and Soviet forces, and Vienna was divided into five zones, including an international zone, covering the Innere Stadt (“Inner City”). In 1955 the State Treaty, by which the country regained independence, was signed with the four occupying powers, and Vienna became once again the capital of a sovereign Austria.

Filmed on January 22, 2023 by: Travel and Adventure Studios

Germany Tours: Zwinger To Neustadt In Dresden

DW Travel – Lonely Planet has chosen Dresden as one of its top travel destinations for 2023. We have long been convinced that Dresden is well worth visiting, so now we will show you why. Follow us from the Zwinger to the hip Neustadt district.

Dresden, city, capital of Saxony Land (state), eastern Germany. Dresden is the traditional capital of Saxony and the third largest city in eastern Germany after Berlin and Leipzig. It lies in the broad basin of the Elbe River between Meissen and Pirna, 19 miles (30 km) north of the Czech border and 100 miles (160 km) south of Berlin. Sheltering hills north and south of the Elbe valley contribute to the mild climate enjoyed by Dresden. Numerous parks and cultural monuments exist along the Elbe’s course, particularly a steel bridge (1891–93), a cable railway (1898–1901), and a funicular (1894–95). The Elbe valley around the city was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2004, but the construction of a four-lane bridge across the river caused UNESCO to revoke the designation in 2009. Pop. (2021 est.) 555,351.

History

Dresden originated as the Slav village of Drezdzany, meaning “Forest Dwellers on the Plain,” on the Elbe’s north bank. First mentioned in 1216, the town on the south bank was founded at a ford by Margrave Dietrich of Meissen as a German colony. The Slav settlement on the north bank, although older, was known as New Town and the later German town on the south bank as Old Town.

Walking Tour: Glasgow In Southwestern Scotland

Tourister (January 2023) – Glasgow, Gaelic Glaschu, city, west-central Scotland. It is situated along both banks of the River Clyde 20 miles (32 km) from that river’s mouth on the western, or Atlantic, coast. Glasgow is Scotland’s largest city, and it forms an independent council area that lies entirely within the historic county of Lanarkshire.

The city occupies much of the lower Clyde valley, and its suburbs extend into surrounding districts. Most important commercial and administrative buildings lie north of the Clyde. Area council area, 68 square miles (177 square km).

Aerial Views: Antalya In Southwestern Turkey (4K)

World in 4K – Antalya is a Turkish resort city with a yacht-filled Old Harbor and beaches flanked by large hotels. It’s a gateway to Turkey’s southern Mediterranean region, known as the Turquoise Coast for its blue waters. Remnants remain from Antalya’s time as a major Roman port. These include Hadrian’s Gate, built to honor the Roman emperor’s visit in 130 A.D and 2nd-century Hidirlik Tower, with harbor views. 

South Of France Views: A Guided Tour Of Antibes

4K Urban Life – A 4K walking tour of Antibes, France. Filmmaker Anius Narkevicius decided to create a real virtual tour with a guide to show you the most iconic places of the ancient city of the French Riviera.

Video timeline: Le Grand Hotel 00:03:06 La Porte De France 00:06:30 Le Ptit Cageot 00:16:41 Socca Bar 00:22:45 Entre 9 Vins Bistrot 00:22:56 The Oldest Neighborhood of the City 00:50:02 Provential Market 00:54:03 Port Vauban 00:58:48 The Nomad Of Antibes 01:04:37 Cap d’Antibes 01:14:31

Meet Cedric, a talented guide who will reveal the secrets of Antibes to you! You will walk along the ancient streets, see the fortress and the magnificent city port. Cedric will tell you many interesting facts and stories about the city and show you the incredible beauty of the Mediterranean coast.

Antibes is a beautiful city on the azure coast of France, located in the middle between Cannes and Nice. The ancient walled city of Antibes is one of the liveliest and most beautiful on the Riviera. It has a relaxed beach vibe all year round, a thriving superyacht port and a gorgeous old town with narrow cobbled streets, markets and cafes. The city is also known as the home of the Spanish artist Pablo Picasso.

Aerial Views: Santiago – Capital Of Chile (4K)

Santiago, capital of Chile. It lies on the canalized Mapocho River, with views of high Andean peaks to the east.

The city was founded as Santiago del Nuevo Extremo (“Santiago of the New Frontier”) in 1541 by the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Valdivia. The area was inhabited by the Picunche Indians, who were placed under the rule of the Spanish settlers. The original city site was limited by the two surrounding arms of the Mapocho River and by Huelén (renamed Santa Lucía) Hill to the east, which served as a lookout.

Greater Santiago contains Chile’s greatest concentration of industry. The main products are foodstuffs, textiles, shoes, and clothes; metallurgy and copper mining are also important. The city also has an active financial sector, including a stock exchange, the major banks with hundreds of branches, and many insurance companies.

Santiago is the centre of the nation’s railroads. Highways and roads connect the city with the ports of San Antonio to the west and Valparaíso to the northwest, thus providing an outlet to the Pacific Ocean. The city has a subway system, and air services are provided by the international airport at Pudahuel and the airport at Los Cerrillos, which handles domestic flights. There are also two smaller civil airports—Lo Castillo and Tobalaba—as well as El Bosque, a military airport.

Aerial Views: Braga In Northwestern Portugal

Mesmerizing Time – Braga is a city in the far north of Portugal, northeast of Porto. It’s known for its religious heritage and events. To the east, Bom Jesus do Monte complex has a neoclassical church atop an elaborate 17-flight stairway. In the city center, medieval Braga Cathedral is home to a sacred art museum and the Gothic-style Kings’ Chapel. Nearby, the imposing Archbishop’s Palace overlooks Santa Barbara Garden.

Aerial Views: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

TYLER WALKS (December 2022) – Vancouver, city, southwestern British ColumbiaCanada. It is the major urban centre of western Canada and the focus of one of the country’s most populous metropolitan regions. Vancouver lies between Burrard Inlet (an arm of the Strait of Georgia) to the north and the Fraser River delta to the south, opposite Vancouver Island. The city is just north of the U.S. state of Washington. It has a fine natural harbour on a superb site facing the sea and mountains. Pop. (2011) 603,502; metro. area, 2,313,328; (2021) 662,248; metro. area, 2,642,825.

History

The region had long been inhabited by several Native American (First Nations) peoples when a trading post, Fort Langley, was set up by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1827 near the mouth of the Fraser River. Few people of European descent lived in the area until the late 1850s, when the town of New Westminster (now a suburb of Vancouver) was established near the site of the original fort (in 1839 the fort itself had been relocated a little farther upstream).

Thousands of miners, mostly from California, flooded into the region in the 1860s, attracted by the gold rush in the Cariboo Mountains to the northeast. Besides the Scottish, who were very influential in Vancouver’s early years, Americans had a notable impact on the city. The suggestion to name it Vancouver was made by an American, William Van Horne, president of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

And the city’s most-often elected mayor (nine nonconsecutive terms from 1919 to 1933), L.D. Taylor, was originally from the United States. Moreover, the first important industry in the area, a sawmill on Burrard Inlet, was owned by an American. Finally, the first major industry not reliant on local natural resources, a still-active sugar refinery, was started by an American.

Walking Tours: Prague In The Czech Republic (4K)

Tourister (November 2022) Prague, Czech Praha, city, capital of the Czech Republic. Lying at the heart of Europe, it is one of the continent’s finest cities and the major Czech economic and cultural centre. The city has a rich architectural heritage that reflects both the uncertain currents of history in Bohemia and an urban life extending back more than 1,000 years.

The physical attractions and landmarks of Prague are many. Among the finest is the Charles Bridge (Karlův most), which stands astride the Vltava River. The winding course of the Vltava, with its succession of bridges and changing vistas, contrasts with the ever-present backdrop of the great castle of Hradčany (Prague Castle), which dominates the left-bank region of the city from behind massive walls set high on a hill.

The narrow streets and little taverns and restaurants of the older quarters contrast with the broad sweep of Wenceslas Square and modern parks and housing developments, while the great 18th-century Baroque palaces have their own elegance and splendour. Seen from the surrounding hills, the many church towers make up a unique perspective, giving Prague its description as the “city of a hundred spires.”

This architectural harmony was enhanced by post-1945 planning, which preserved the ancient core of the city as a major monument and carefully supervised all modern building. In 1992 the historic city centre was added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List.