Tag Archives: Wall Street Journal

Health Care Technology: Human Voice Sound Wave Analysis Detects Disease Onset, Checks Depression

From a Wall Street Journal online article by Sarah Krouse:

In medicine, measuring slight changes in voice is starting to help doctors detect the onset of diseases like Parkinson’s or more quickly measure the efficacy of treatments for illnesses like depression, researchers say.

Human voice technology Photo by Ellen Winstein for the Wall Street JournalSlower speech, for example, could indicate fatigue or sorrow at one point in time, but over longer periods could signal something more severe, co-founder Jim Harper said.

That voice-based data isn’t yet robust enough to base medical decisions on alone, but is being used alongside clinical trials for drugs to treat depression, Mr. Harper said.

The sound of your voice is becoming a new type of fingerprint.

Increasingly sophisticated technology that detects nuances in sound inaudible to humans is capturing clues about people’s likely locations, medical conditions and even physical features.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/what-your-voice-reveals-about-you-11565716426

Books On Boomers: “Stop Mugging Grandma” By Jennie Bristow Seeks To Edify The Boomer Bashers

From a Wall Street Journal book review by Daniel Akst:

Stop Mugging Grandma by Jennie BristowAt the center of the attack on those of us born between 1946 and 1964, days when the U.S. birth rate was extraordinarily high, is our supposed radical individualism. Its roots are said to be found in the excesses of the 1960s, a decade for which “boomers have become fall guys.”

Ms. Bristow, to her everlasting credit, isn’t buying it. “What about the two catastrophic world wars that had dominated the first half of the century; the cynical hedonism of the ‘Roaring Twenties’; the parasitism of colonialism and racial segregation?”

Ms. Bristow, a sociology professor in England, shrewdly situates this new resentment in the context of today’s vogue for collective responsibility and the transmission of guilt across many generations. “Generationalism,” as she calls it, “has come to find its most comfortable home within identity politics, that shrill sentiment of victimisation and grievance that has become an increasingly powerful cultural force.”

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/stop-mugging-grandma-review-defying-the-boomer-bashers-11565651816

Iconic Movies: Film Noir Thriller “Double Indemnity” (1944) Directed By Billy Wilder Turns 75

Feom a Wall Street Journal Arts & Entertainment article:

Double_Indemnity_publSeventy-five years ago, “Double Indemnity” opened in theaters across America. It was an instant hit, and remains to this day a staple offering of revival houses and on cable TV and streaming video. Yet little journalistic notice has been taken of the birthday of Billy Wilder’s first great screen drama, a homicidal thriller that nonetheless had—and has—something truly unsettling to say about the dark crosscurrents of middle-class American life.

Directed by Wilder and co-written by him and Raymond Chandler, the celebrated mystery novelist, “Double Indemnity” is the story of a restless insurance salesman who helps a sexy, frustrated housewife murder her husband for profit. Though neither Wilder nor Chandler realized it at the time, it would later be acknowledged by critics and scholars as the first fully developed example of film noir, in which a flawed but basically innocent protagonist is presented with a moral choice, makes the wrong call, and is plunged into a violent after-hours world of passion and crime.

To read more click on following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-film-noir-icon-turns-75-11565637941

Vintage Road Trips: 1966 Ford Country Squire Station Wagon Drives The Mississippi River Valley

From a Wall Street Journal Off Duty Travel article by By Matthew Kronsberg::

The Country Squire in the Stockholm, Wis. PHOTO ACKERMAN + GRUBER FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNALChoosing a landscape for a car is like choosing a wine for a meal. The Country Squire—which, I discovered, handled with all the nimbleness of a riverboat—felt like a natural pairing for the Mississippi River valley south of the Twin Cities. The curves would be gentle, and the views sweeping: high bluffs on one side of the car, water on the other. My family and I would pick up Highway 61 in St. Paul, hopscotching between it and Wisconsin’s fantastically scenic Great River Road, exploring the small waterfront towns along the way. We’d stop for the first night in Red Wing, Minn., and the next in Alma, Wis., 98 miles downriver. The car came with a 150-mile-a-day allowance, and a request that we not venture farther than 100 miles from Minneapolis, should anything happen.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-road-trip-with-retro-charmand-a-car-to-match-11565352147

To rent the Ford Country Squire: http://morriesheritage.com/cars/1966-ford-country-squire/?portfolioCats=1077%2C1078%2C1079%2C1081

Behind The Scenes Books: “Stealing The Show” By John Barelli Showcases The NY Metropolitan Museum Of Art Security

From a Wall Street Journal book review:

Stealing The Show John BarelliWhen Diana, Princess of Wales, attended the Met’s Costume Institute Gala in 1996, a black-tie-clad Mr. Barelli was at her side. “I wasn’t nervous, but the pressure!” he said. “You don’t want anything to go wrong.” The princess had one request: that he keep an eye on the black lace shoulder straps of her midnight blue Dior dress and adjust them if they slipped. “I almost told her: ‘Yeah, right, I have to touch your dress.’ That’s all I have to do. I think my wife would be a little upset,” he recalled. There was no wardrobe malfunction and the evening went off without a hitch, although Mr. Barelli remembers security concerns putting a damper on the fun-loving princess. “We couldn’t let her dance,” he said.

Mr. Barelli, now 70 years old, devoted much of his tenure to less-glamorous work, such as disposing of artifacts from would-be donors. In 2007, a curator in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas received two shrunken human heads in the mail. The cardboard box had no return address, just a note donating the contents, which the sender said had come from friends in Ecuador. “They did have an odor,” said Mr. Barelli, who ultimately consigned the package to the city morgue.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/royalty-a-naked-visitor-and-shrunken-heads-at-the-met-11565521202

Boomers Fitness: 50-Year Old Man Paddles In An Outrigger Canoe Club To Stay In Competitive Shape

From a Wall Street Journal article by Jen Murphy:

Mr. Alona, who grew up on Oahu, spent his youth bodyboarding, scuba diving and freediving. Photo by Ryan Henriksen for the Wall Street JournalMr. Aiona paddles with his club on Tuesday and Thursday nights and Saturday mornings for 90 minutes to two hours.They alternate between sprints and endurance paddles of up to eight miles in a six-man outrigger canoe. They also work on paddle technique and do huli drills. “Huli is Hawaiian for turn over,” he explains. “If you flip your canoe there is a very precise process for getting everyone safely and efficiently back in. We call out positions to make sure no one is underneath.
Then we work together to flip it, get all of the paddles into the canoe, bail water and get going again.”
On Sundays he paddles seven to 10 miles alone.“Flaws become more apparent as there is no one else to carry your weight,” he says. Sometimes he and another club member train together in a canoe. In winter, lights are added to the canoes for evening practices and Mr. Aiona dons boots and wetsuit -style pants.

Hobbies: Former “Vanity Fair” Editor Graydon Carter With His 1951 Chevrolet Woodie (WSJ)

From a Wall Street Journal article by A.J. Baime:

There was something wonderful and free-wheeling about the experience. There was no air-conditioning, no seat belts, and theride was rickety, so my kids would bounce around in back. The car was built beforeinterstate highways, and it doesn’t go over40 mph. It was also among the firstgeneration of cars with an automatic transmission. The previous owner kept aninstruction manual tucked into the visor onhow to use the automatic, which is kind of funny.

Graydon Carter with his 1951 Chevrolet woodie, at hishome in Litchfield County, Conn. JULIE BIDWELL FOR THEWALL STREET JOURNAL

Graydon Carter, the former longtime editor of Vanity Fair magazine and founder of the  new digital weekly Air Mail, on his 1951 Chevrolet woodie, as told to A.J. Baime.

To read more click on following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-the-family-graydon-carters-1951-chevrolet-11565102890