Tag Archives: Science Magazine

Research Preview: Science Magazine- February 3, 2023

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Science Magazine – February 3, 2023 issue:

Neanderthals lived in groups big enough to eat giant elephants

Meat from the butchered beasts would have fed hundreds

The Pāhala swarm of earthquakes in Hawai‘i

A magma network may feed into different volcanoes, including Mauna Loa and Kīlauea

Arid lands, imperial ambitions

Desert knowledge exchange cloaked imperial goals, argues a political geographer

Research Preview: Science Magazine- January 27, 2023

Science Magazine (January 27, 2023) – The Amazon forest is changing rapidly as a result of human activities, including deforestation for agriculture, such as these soybean fields in Belterra, Pará, Brazil. Remaining areas of forest are experiencing an increased incidence of fires, drought, and the effects of neighboring land uses. These changes threaten local biodiversity and communities and alter the global climate.

Bird flu spread between mink is a ‘warning bell’

Big outbreak at a Spanish farm reignites fears of an H5N1 influenza pandemic

Can California’s floods help recharge depleted aquifers?

Plans to drown orchards and farm fields to boost groundwater supplies get off to a slow start

In Science Journals

Highlights from the Science family of journals

Research Preview: Nature Magazine- January 19, 2023

Volume 613 Issue 7944

nature Magazine – January 19, 2023 issue:

How the periodic table survived a war to secure chemistry’s future

A century ago, the discovery of hafnium confirmed the validity of the periodic table — but only thanks to scientists who stood up for evidence at a time of global turmoil.

How to make wearable devices people could forget they’re wearing

A metal–polymer composite conducts electricity and conforms to the skin, making it suitable for medical devices applied directly to the body.

Demon goddess moon takes control of a planet

Dwarf planet Eris’ rotation is constrained by its large moon Dysnomia, named after the Greek goddess of lawlessness.

Huge genomic study shows varicose veins’ links to height and weight

Analysis of more than one million people suggests that roughly 16% of the condition can be attributed to genetic factors.

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Jan 23, 2023

Science Magazine – January 13, 2023 issue:

NASA unveils initial plan for multibillion-dollar telescope to find life on alien worlds

Habitable Worlds Observatory would be designed for robotic servicing

Illegal mining has muddied tropical rivers worldwide

Silt overload and mercury pollution endanger river ecosystems—and the people who depend on them

FDA approves new antibody to slow Alzheimer’s disease, even as safety concerns linger

Agency warns about brain swelling and bleeding on drug’s label, but imposes few restrictions on lecanemab’s use

Research Preview: Science Magazine – January 6, 2023

Science | AAAS

Science Magazine – January 6, 2023 Issue:

China is flying blind as the pandemic rages

Official death tolls are impossibly low, and some worry new variants may escape detection

Did ancient tentacled microbes kick-start complex life?

New studies suggest early Asgards evolved into eukaryotes

Once banned, spending earmarks see resurgence

Lawmakers can’t resist steering cash to universities and research projects back home

Ancient points suggest Asian roots for early American tools

Finds may support coastal route hypothesis for first settlers

Virus hunters test new surveillance tools

Ropes, drones, insects, and dust cloths could make monitoring faster, safer, and cheaper

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Dec 23, 2022

Science Magazine – December 23, 2022 issue:

Mars’s magnetic field was long-lived, reversible

Study of famed meteorite by quantum microscope hints at planet’s prolonged habitability

Lessons on transparency from the glassfrog

Transparency in glassfrogs has potential implications for human blood clotting

Making modern medicines

The business side of drug development comes to the fore in a tale of two blockbuster blood cancer therapeutics

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Dec 16, 2022

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Science Magazine – December 16, 2022 issue:

2022 BREAKTHROUGH OF THE YEAR

Golden eye

A new space telescope makes a spectacular debut after a troubled gestation

Tarantula Nebula captured by JWST’s Mid-Infrared Instrument. In this light, the young hot stars of the cluster fade in brilliance, and glowing gas and dust come forward.

Seen with JWST’s midinfrared instrument, the newborn stars of the Tarantula nebula fade into the background while clouds of dust and gas take center stage, including hydrocarbons that will later form planets.NASA; ESA; CSA; STSCI; WEBB ERO PRODUCTION TEAM

RUNNERS-UP

Perennial rice promises easier farming

AI gets creative

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Dec 9, 2022

Science Magazine – December 9, 2022 issue:

Alzheimer’s drug stirs excitement—and concerns

Antibody slows cognitive decline, but deaths, brain bleeds, and swelling mar results

NASA radar altimetry mission to study hidden ocean swirls

Enhanced resolution of SWOT satellite will highlight how small eddies soak up heat and carbon

Image problems besiege Stanford president

Marc Tessier-Lavigne’s early papers are subject of school and journal investigations

In China, ‘zero COVID’ has become a Catch-2

Population chafes at control measures, but lifting them now would carry huge risks

New U.S. law aims to light up medical research on cannabis

Biden signs bill streamlining pot studies and production

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Dec 2, 2022

Current Issue Cover

@ScienceMagazine December 2, 2022:

Madagascar’s extraordinary biodiversity: Evolution, distribution, and use

Early snowmelt and polar jet dynamics co-influence recent extreme Siberian fire seasons

Monitoring of cell-cell communication and contact history in mammals

The human signal peptidase complex acts as a quality control enzyme for membrane proteins

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Nov 25, 2022

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Science Magazine – November 25, 2022 issue:

Cell engineering

The successful use of engineered white blood cells (cells that are removed from the human body, modified with receptors that allow them to recognize cancer cells, and then returned to the body) to fight and eliminate tumor cells has frequently been called revolutionary and has even allowed researchers the rare opportunity to refer to a cure for certain cancers.

How to regrow a forest? Scientists aren’t sure

Reforestation has become a global priority but evidence on what works is still scant

‘Ancestry problem’ sends CRISPR astray in some people

Reference genomes used to direct the gene editor fail to account for human diversity in those of African descent

AI learns the art of Diplomac

Meta’s algorithm tackles both language and strategy in a classic board game that involves negotiationNASA mulls end for long-lived climate sentinels

NASA mulls end for long-lived climate sentinels

Drifting satellites could still yield insights into wildfires and storms, researchers argue