Tag Archives: Science Magazine

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 30, 2022

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The genetics of a long life

Genetically diverse mice and cross-species comparison uncover links to longevity

New Omicron strains may portend big COVID-19 waves

Emerging subvariants are more immune evasive than ever

Room-temperature superconductor claim retracted

After doubts grew, blockbuster Nature paper is withdrawn over objections of study team

University pandemic policies raise equity worries

Tenure delays and pandemic impact statements could backfire, some fear

Signs of state meddling seen in Russian academy election

Leader of Russia’s largest chipmaker elected president after incumbent’s sudden withdrawal

Fraud charges crumble in China Initiative cases

Judges reject claims that defendants defrauded agencies by not disclosing China ties

Books: ‘The Biggest Ideas in the Universe – Space, Time, And Motion’ (2022)

The Biggest Ideas in the Universe

Vol. 1: SPACE, TIME, AND MOTION

The Biggest Ideas in the Universe

Vol. 1: SPACE, TIME, AND MOTION

Book cover for Sean Carroll's "The Biggest Ideas in the Universe"

Dutton Books, 20 September 2022

The goal of The Biggest Ideas in the Universe is to bridge the gap between popular-science treatments of modern physics and true expert knowledge. This is the real stuff — equations and all — presented in a way that presumes no prior knowledge other than high-school algebra. Readers will come up to speed about exactly what professional physicists are talking about, with an emphasis on established knowledge rather than speculation.

Volume One, Space, Time, and Motion, covers the domain of classical physics, from Newton to Einstein. We get introduced to Spherical Cow Philosophy, in which complications are stripped away to reveal the essence of a system, and the Laplacian Paradigm, in which the laws of physics take us from initial conditions into the future by marching through time. We learn the basic ideas of calculus, where we can calculate rates of change and how much of a quantity has accumulated. We think about the nature of space and time, separately and together. Finally we are introduced to the mysteries of non-Riemannian geometry and Einstein’s theory of curved spacetime, culminating into a dive into black holes.

Read more

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 16, 2022

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Seasonal monsoon rainfall replenishes groundwater reserves in the Bengal basin of Bangladesh thanks to the region’s seemingly counterintuitive intensive dry-season irrigation practices, a new Science study finds.

Europe’s energy crisis hits science hard

Supercomputing and accelerator centers struggle with surging gas and electricity prices

Private venture tackles Long Covid, aims to test drugs soon

Initiative to explore whether coronavirus lingers in patients

U.S. Antarctic Program has ignored sexual harassment

Decades of complaints have gone unheeded by NSF and contractors managing operations, employees say

Polio returns in rich countries, but big outbreaks are unlikely

As New York state declares an emergency, experts are far more worried about a resurgence in low-income countries

Read that and more in this week’s issue: https://fcld.ly/dt1xr77

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 9, 2022

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Twisty device explores alternative path to fusion

Revamped German stellarator should run longer, hotter and compete with tokamaks

New tech law offers billions for research

CHIPS act will fund microelectronics innovation and training through large partnerships

Warming of 1.5°C carries risk of crossing climate tipping points

Scientists call for concerted effort to forecast points of no return for ice, weather patterns, and ecosystems

California EV rules jolt battery science

Move to phase out gas-powered cars will force progress toward faster charging batteries

Fauci looks back—and ahead

Loved and hated, NIAID’s chief plots life after government

Research: Free-Floating DNA And Oxidation Zones

On this week’s show: The U.S. government is partnering with academics to speed up the search for more than 80,000 soldiers who went missing in action, and how humans create their own “oxidation zone” in the air around them.

First up on the podcast this week, Tess Joosse is a former news intern here at Science and is now a freelance science journalist based in Madison, Wisconsin. Tess talks with host Sarah Crespi about attempts to use environmental DNA—free-floating DNA in soil or water—to help locate the remains of soldiers lost at sea. Also featured in this segment:

University of Wisconsin, Madison, molecular biologist Bridget Ladell Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution marine biologist Kirstin Meyer-Kaiser

Also this week, Nora Zannoni, a postdoctoral researcher in the atmospheric chemistry department at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, talks about people’s contributions to indoor chemistry. She chats with Sarah about why it’s important to go beyond studying the health effects of cleaning chemicals and gas stoves to explore how humans add their own bodies’ chemicals and reactions to the air we breathe. In a sponsored segment from Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for Custom Publishing, interviews Benedetto Marelli, associate professor at MIT, about winning the BioInnovation Institute & Science Prize for Innovation and how he became an entrepreneur. 

Research Preview: Science Magazine – September 2

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U.S. to require free access to papers on all research it funds

The plan, to start at the end of 2025, is a blow to journal paywalls, but its impact on publishing is unclear

Carbon dioxide detected around alien world for first time

Webb telescope discovery offers clue to planet formation and promises insights on planetary habitability

Researchers tackle vexing side effects of potent cancer drugs

Wider use of checkpoint inhibitor therapy spurs efforts to predict and treat immune complications

Omicron shots are coming—with lots of questions

Decisions on boosters targeting subvariants will be based on limited data

Zimbabwe find illuminates dawn of the dinosaurs

Nearly complete specimen shows earliest dinosaurs needed a temperate climate

Research Preview: Science Magazine – August 26, 2022

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Ancient DNA from the Near East probes a cradle of civilization

Studies seek clues to origins of farming, early languages

Global drought experiment reveals the toll on plant growth

Artificial droughts sharply cut carbon storage

Researchers watch how Arctic storms chew up sea ice

Airborne campaign to study summer cyclones could reveal air-ice interactions

Deadly bird flu establishes a foothold in North America

H5N1 has continued to kill wild birds and poultry this summer. The fall migration could bring it back in force

Many-eyed scope will make movies of the stars

Argus Array will combine hundreds of off-the-shelf telescopes to capture fleeting events

FEATURE

Sparkling waters

Tiny Caribbean crustaceans and their bioluminescent mating displays are shining new light on evolution

Research Preview: Science Magazine – August 19, 2022

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Small stowaways on new NASA rocket promise big science

Batteries allowing, CubeSats will target lunar ice and more

China rises to first place in one key metric of research impact

Other methods still put the United States somewhat ahead

New law’s big payout for farming has uncertain climate payoff

Measures to capture carbon in soil may be less effective than hoped, scientists say

Bioengineering soybean plants to improve regulation of photoprotection—a natural process that enables plants to cope with excess absorbed light energy—improved soybean seed yield by up to 33% in field trials.

Read that study and more this week in Science: https://fcld.ly/r6g2kix

Cover Previews: Science Magazine – August 12, 2022

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Death’s-head moths correct course based on an internal “compass,” a new study finds, revealing insights into how insects traverse such long distances during seasonal migrations.

Scientists scramble to set up monkeypox vaccine trials

Logistical and ethical challenges are complicating the design of efficacy studies

Harassment researchers decry proposed reporting rule

U.S. Title IX law update requiring mandatory reporting of sexual misconduct would cause harm, they say

Star’s midlife crisis illuminates our Sun’s history—and future

Long magnetic lull mimics Maunder Minimum, when sunspots largely disappeared 400 years ago

Star marine ecologist guilty of misconduct, university says

University of Delaware finding vindicates whistleblowers

Webb reveals early universe’s galactic bounty

Star formation after the big bang appears much faster than models had forecast

Read that research and more this week in Science. https://fcld.ly/zebukkw

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – August 5, 2022

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The unrecognized value of grass

Marram grass, or beachgrass, grows on and stabilizes coastal sand dunes on Ireland’s Dingle Peninsula. Grasses, whether terrestrial or submarine, tend to be undervalued but have influenced the trajectory of human history through their domestication as food staples, as well as natural ecosystems worldwide. If restored and conserved appropriately, grasslands can benefit climate change mitigation efforts. See the special section beginning on page 590.

A new special issue of Science explores the unrecognized value of grass: https://fcld.ly/bo80dpr