Tag Archives: Health Studies

Health Studies: Short Sleep Duration And Sleep Disorders Have Adverse Effects On Heart Health

From a Circulation online release:

Average hours of nightly sleep…these results indicate that sleep may play an important role in health disparities and may represent a modifiable risk factor (along with diet and physical activity) for cardiometabolic risk in general and cardiometabolic health disparities specifically.

Statement Summary

Our review of the epidemiological data on the impact of sleep duration and disorders on cardiovascular health suggests the following:

  1. Both short- and long-duration sleep and sleep disorders such as SDB and insomnia are associated with adverse cardiometabolic risk profiles and outcomes.

  2. Sleep restriction has a negative impact on energy balance, but it is less clear whether treating sleep disorders has a positive impact on obesity risk.

  3. Treating those with sleep disorders may provide clinical benefits, particularly for blood pressure.

Sleep is increasingly recognized as an important lifestyle contributor to health. However, this has not always been the case, and an increasing number of Americans choose to curtail sleep in favor of other social, leisure, or work-related activities. This has resulted in a decline in average sleep duration over time. Sleep duration, mostly short sleep, and sleep disorders have emerged as being related to adverse cardiometabolic risk, including obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000444

Health Studies: Silent Or “Covert” Strokes Are Post-Surgery Risks, Increasing Risk Of Cognitive Decline

From a The Telegraph online article:

A new study (in The Lancet, Aug 16, 2019) reveals that pensioners who have an operation have a one in 14 chance of suffering a silent or “covert” stroke – an event that shows no obvious symptoms but can damage the brain.

The Lancet Covert Strokes Aug 16 2019

More than 1,100 patients across the world were given MRI scans nine days after some form of major non-cardiac surgery.

They were then followed up a year later to assess their cognitive abilities.

The researchers found that not only did having a silent stroke double the chances of cognitive decline a year on, it also increased the chances of a full life-threatening stroke.

Suffering a mini-stroke increased the risk of experiencing postoperative delirium as well.

The Lancet Study: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)31795-7/fulltext?utm_campaign=clinical19&utm_content=98869259&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&hss_channel=tw-27013292

To read more click on the following link: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2019/08/15/silent-stroke-risk-major-surgery-revealed-new-study/

New Cancer Studies: “Oldest Old” (85+ Years) Are 2% Of Population, 8% Of New Cancer Diagnoses

CA - A Cancer Journal for Clinicians American Cancer Society

Adults aged 85 years and older, the “oldest old,” are the fastest-growing age group in the United States, yet relatively little is known about their cancer burden. Combining data from the National Cancer Institute, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, and the National Center for Health Statistics, the authors provide comprehensive information on cancer occurrence in adults aged 85 years and older. In 2019, there will be approximately 140,690 cancer cases diag-nosed and 103,250 cancer deaths among the oldest old in the United States. The most common cancers in these individuals (lung, breast, prostate, and colorectum) are the same as those in the general population. Overall cancer incidence rates peaked in the oldest men and women around 1990 and have subsequently declined, with the pace accelerating during the past decade. These trends largely reflect declines in cancers of the prostate and colorectum and, more recently, cancers of the lung among men and the breast among women.

Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths Age 85 years and older

To read entire study click on following link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.3322/caac.21577

Boomers Health: Fasting Before Blood Tests For Cholesterol Is Not Necessary Study Finds

From a Harvard Heart Health online article:

Non Fasting Blood Testing for ChloresterolFor the study, nearly 8,300 people at risk for heart disease had fasting and nonfasting lipid profile tests done at least four weeks apart. (Fasting means they had nothing to eat or drink except water for at least eight hours before the test.) The differences in their total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol values were negligible. Triglyceride levels were modestly higher in the nonfasting samples.

Don’t want to skip breakfast before your cholesterol test? You probably don’t need to. A study published online May 28 by JAMA Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that fasting isn’t necessary before this common blood test, often referred to as a lipid profile.

To read more click on following link: https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/farewell-to-fasting-before-a-cholesterol-test

Health Studies: Vitamin D Deficiency Can Increase Lower Back Pain, With Lower Muscle Strength

From a U.S. National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health release:

Vitamin D CapsulesIn people having lack of Vitamin D, the muscle strength of waist, back, neck decreases. Decreased muscle strength can cause herniated disc and cervical discal hernia. All of this is reflected in the patient’s pain. We wanted to pay attention to the necessity of considering the lack of Vitamin D in low back pain (LBP) which is one of the common complaints of our patients.

LBP and lack of vitamins are the most common health problems in our country and all over the world. The synthesis of >90% of Vitamin D in the body occurs under the influence of sunlight. Vitamin D, taken with foods, does not have a significant contribution, especially after a supplement is not taken. Seasonal and geographical changes are inevitable in the synthesis of Vitamin D in the derailment as the primary source is sunlight.[,,] The average prevalence in Vitamin D deficiency prevalence studies in the USA is reported as 41.6%, which is 82.1% in Black people and 69.2% in Hispanics.[] Hovsepian et al.[] reported a 50.8% prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in the young adult population.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157211/

Drug Studies: Ibuprofen & Anti-Inflammatories “Enhance Spread Of Antibiotic Resistance

From a BioRxiv.com online news release:

Antiobiotic Resistance IllustrationAntibiotic resistance is a global threat for public health. It is widely acknowledged that antibiotics at sub-inhibitory concentrations are important in disseminating antibiotic resistance via horizontal gene transfer. While there is high use of non-antibiotic human-targeted pharmaceuticals in our societies, the potential contribution of these on the spread of antibiotic resistance has been overlooked so far. Here, we report that commonly consumed non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac), a lipid-lowering drug (gemfibrozil), and a β-blocker (propanolol), at clinically and environmentally relevant concentrations, significantly accelerated the conjugation of plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes.

To read more click on following link: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/724500v1.full

Boomers Health: New Study Confirms Superior Weight Loss Benefits Of Morning Exercise

From an International Journal of Obesity July 2019 study:

Early Morning ExerciseThis study, combined with the results of previous studies, supports the hypothesis that engaging in morning exercise may result in more weight loss compared to engaging in a similar amount of exercise later in the day. Furthermore, we observed individuals who performed most of their exercise sessions in the afternoon or evening tended to have slightly higher levels of EI and reduced NEPA and NEEx, suggesting that there are potentially important differences in the components of energy balance based on time of day exercise is performed.

Background/objectives

Circadian physiology has been linked to body weight regulation and obesity. To date, few studies have assessed the association between exercise timing and weight related outcomes. The aim of this secondary analysis was to explore the impact of exercise timing (i.e., 24 h clock time of exercise session) on weight loss and components of energy balance.

To read more click on following link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41366-019-0409-x