Tag Archives: England

Classic Movie Trailers: “A Streetcar Named Desire” Re-released In UK Before 70th Anniversary (1951)

Vivien Leigh and Marlon Brando star in Elia Kazan’s acclaimed adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ landmark play – back in UK cinemas from 7 February.

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Top Restaurants: “Bar Douro London” Owner Max Graham Talks About Rise Of Portugese Food

Bar Douro Portugese Food London Owner Max Graham
Bar Douro London Owner Max Graham

Occupying a railway arch in London’s buzzing Flat Iron Square, Bar Douro was created as a way to bring authentic Portuguese food to London. With ties to Portugal traced back through the family, Bar Douro has matched exquisite Portuguese wines with all the tradition of local Portuguese food. The atmospheric 30-cover marble counter-top dining space offers an intimate window to the best of Portuguese culinary heritage.

Bar Douro London Website

The Menu Monocle 24 logo
https://monocle.com/radio/shows/the-menu/

Video Profiles: London Architect Richard Found In His Cotswold Retreat

When designer Richard Found discovered the dream plot on which to build his serene contemporary retreat overlooking a lake, he didn’t bet on what happened next. In the grounds stood a derelict 18th-century gamekeeper’s cottage, which was immediately spot-listed by Historic England. “It changed the whole dynamic of what I thought would be a straightforward new-build project, and became a far more arduous planning exercise.”…

House Proud is a series of videos created by the Telegraph which showcase some of Britain’s most idiosyncratic, quirky, unusual and unforgettable homes. A celebration of British eccentricity and imagination, in each film the owner gives us an intimate guided tour and tells us the story of their unique property.

Richard Found's Radical Retreat Gloucestershire England The Telegraphy Video January 16 2020

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Study: “Probiotic Drink” Developed That Thwarts Antibiotic Resistance

From a Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News online article:

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News logo“We were able to show that if you can stop the plasmid from replicating, then most of the bacteria lose the plasmid as the bacteria grow and divide. This means that infections that might otherwise be hard to control, even with the most powerful antibiotics available, are more likely to be treatable with standard antibiotics.”

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Fig 1. Anticipated exploitation of pCURE as a probiotic treatment for at-risk individuals. Before treatment, plasmids carrying antibiotic resistance genes are shown as purple circles. After treatment, target plasmids are replaced by pCURE (green circle) which could be engineered to later “self-destruct”. Note that not all gut bacteria carry resistance plasmids but pCURE can enter all Enterobacteriaceae as well as other bacteria. Reduced resistance levels in the gut decrease the chance of treatment failure when infections elsewhere in the body (eg lungs or urinary tract) arise from gut bacteria.

 

Researchers headed by a team at the University of Birmingham in the U.K. have developed a probiotic drink containing genetic elements that are designed to thwart antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in gut bacteria at the genetic level. The drink targets small DNA elements called plasmids that carry antibiotic resistance genes, and which are able to replicate independently and spread between bacteria. By preventing these plasmids from replicating, the antibiotic resistance genes are displaced, effectively resensitizing the bacteria to antibiotics.

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Travel & Dining: Touring London In A 2020 Morgan Plus Six Roadster (Video)

In GQ’s on-going quest to road test the contenders for the 2020 Car Awards, chef Paul Ainsworth takes a trip down memory lane in a brand new old-school British roadster.

Morgan PlusSix First Edition Moonstone Roadster 2020
Morgan PlusSix First Edition Moonstone Roadster 2020

The winners of the Car Awards, in association with Michelin, will be revealed on 3 February, 2020. Full coverage will appear in the March issue of GQ, on sale 6 February. For more information visit: GQ.co.uk

Profiles: 85-Year Old Primatologist Jane Goodall On A Better Future (Cambridge)

In a new film released as part of Cambridge University’s focus on Sustainable Earth, Dr Jane Goodall DBE talks about the environmental crisis and her reasons for hope. “Every single day that we live, we make some impact on the planet. We have a choice as to what kind of impact that is.”

At the age of 26, Jane Goodall travelled from England to what is now Tanzania, Africa, and ventured into the little-known world of wild chimpanzees. Among her many discoveries, perhaps the greatest was that chimpanzees make and use tools. She completed a PhD at Newnham College in Cambridge in 1966, and subsequently founded the Jane Goodall Institute in 1977 to continue her conservation work and the youth service programme Roots & Shoots in 1991.

She now travels the world as a UN Messenger of Peace. “The human spirit is indomitable. Throughout my life, I’ve met so many incredible people – men and women who tackle what seems impossible and won’t give up until they succeed. With our intellect and our determined spirit, and with the tools that we have now, we can find a way to a better future.”

Cambridge University’s focus on Sustainable Earth looks at how we transition to a carbon zero future, protect the planet’s resources, reduce waste and build resilience.

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Video Interviews: 62-Year Old Journalist Lionel Shriver (Oxford Union)

Lionel Shriver (born Margaret Ann Shriver; May 18, 1957) is an American journalist and author who lives in the United Kingdom. She is best known for her novel We Need to Talk About Kevin, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2005 and was adapted into the 2011 film of the same name, starring Tilda Swinton.

Shriver has written for The Wall Street Journal, the Financial TimesThe New York TimesThe Economist, contributed to the Radio Ulster program Talkback and many other publications. In July 2005, Shriver began writing a column for The Guardian, in which she has shared her opinions on maternal disposition within Western society, the pettiness of British government authorities, and the importance of libraries (she plans to will whatever assets remain at her death to the Belfast Library Board, out of whose libraries she checked many books when she lived in Northern Ireland). She currently writes regularly for The Spectator.

In online articles, she discusses in detail her love of books and plans to leave a legacy to the Belfast Education and Library Board.

From Wikipedia