Tag Archives: Literary Magazines

Previews: The American Scholar – Autumn 2022

Autumn 2022

The Root Problem

Harvesting wild ginseng has sustained Appalachian communities for generations—so what will happen when there are no more plants to be found?

The Degradation Drug

A medication prescribed for Parkinson’s and other diseases can transform a patient’s personality, unleashing heroic bouts of creativity or a torrent of shocking, even criminal behavior

Why We Are Failing to Make the Grade

Covid-19 has contributed to a crisis in America’s classrooms, but the problems predate the pandemic and are likely to outlast it

Covers: New York Review Of Books – Oct 20, 2022

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The Two Elizabeths

The queen presided over the death of a British world and yet was enormously successful in keeping alive the monarchy that symbolized it.


Last Poem

A poem by Emily Berry


‘She Captured All Before Her’

Darryl Pinckney

It used to be that people complained how little they knew of Queen Elizabeth. Toward the end, her remoteness was treasured.


Silences and Scars

Jenny Uglow

Two new books on Berlin track the city through decades of growth, economic desperation, artistic innovation, Nazi terror, political division, and reunification.

Berlin: Life and Death in the City at the Center of the World by Sinclair McKay

The Undercurrents: A Story of Berlin by Kirsty Bell


Lucky Guy

Joshua Cohen

Jared Kushner’s anti-ideological ideology is to get the best deal for whomever he represents—the business he was born into, the business he married into, and, most of all, himself.

Breaking History: A White House Memoir by Jared Kushner

Previews: London Review Of Books – October 6, 2022

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Our new issue is finally online, ft Mahmood Mandani on leaving Uganda, Tony Wood on Russia’s energy crisis, @MJCarter10 at Westminster Abbey, @danielsoar on Ian McEwan, @amiasrinivasan on Andrea Dworkin, T.J. Clark on painting & poetry & a @Jon_McN cover.

On Leaving Uganda

Uganda’s constitution of 1995 entrenched the barrier against citizenship for non-indigenous applicants, who now had to belong to an indigenous group.

At Westminster Abbey

The bald lesson of the abbey’s memorials is that money, power and connections repeatedly trump virtue and talent.

Previews: Times Literary Supplement – Sept 30, 2022

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This week’s @TheTLS , featuring @RichardEvans36 on German militarism; Laura Thompson on Raine Spencer; A. N. Wilson on Turgenev; @colincraiggrant on Eureka Day; Claire Lowdon on Kamila Shamsie; @rauchway on interest rates – and more.

Previews: The New Yorker Magazine – October 3, 2022

Aaron Judge towers over the catcher and hits a baseball at a stadium.
By Françoise Mouly, Art by Mark Ulriksen


The New Yorker Magazine – October 3, 2022

The Shock and Aftershocks of “The Waste Land”

T. S. Eliot’s masterpiece is a hundred years old, but it has never stopped sounding new. By Anthony Lane

Did a Nobel Peace Laureate Stoke a Civil War?

After Ethiopia’s Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed, ended a decades-long border conflict, he was heralded as a unifier. Now critics accuse him of tearing the country apart.

Preview: The New Yorker Magazine – Sept 26, 2022

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Victoria Tentler-Krylov’s “#fallstyle”

The artist discusses Charlotte Gainsbourg, Uggs, and finding inspiration on Instagram.

Was Rudy Giuliani Always So Awful?

A lively new biography explores how the man once celebrated as “America’s mayor” fell into disgrace.

By Louis Menand

From Boy to Bono

I was born with melodies in my head, and I was looking for a way to hear them in the world.

By Bono

Books: Literary Review Of Canada – October 2022

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The Bear and the Beaver – Eight games, one goal – Robert Lewis

Sentence Structure – Views from the inside – Amy Reiswig

Me, My Shelf, and I – An account of empty boxes – Mark Kingwell

An Uncertain Royal Path – Three Windsor women and the future of the monarchy – Patricia Treble

The last Queen of Canada? – What comes next for Canada and the Crown – John Fraser

Covers: New York Review Of Books – October 6, 2022

New York Review October 6, 2022 cover

The October 6 issue is online now, with Bill McKibben on the climate refugee crisis, Hermione Lee on Joseph Roth’s violently mixed feelings, Linda Greenhouse on Justice Breyer’s most powerful dissent, Jerome Groopman on diabetes, Leslie T. Chang on narrative nonfiction in China, Ange Mlinko on H.D., David S. Reynolds on séances in the Lincoln White House, Verlyn Klinkenborg on the Beach Boys’ moment in the sun, Erin Maglaque on the pope’s astronomer, Mark Danner on the long, slow Trump coup, a poem by Vona Groarke, and much more.

Where Will We Live?

Three books on the movement, of both humans and wildlife, spurred by climate change illustrate the magnitude of the challenge before us.

Nowhere Left to Go: How Climate Change Is Driving Species to the Ends of the Earth – by Benjamin von Brackel, translated from the German by Ayça Türkoğlu

Nomad Century: How Climate Migration Will Reshape Our World – by Gaia Vince

Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism, and the Rise of Racist Nationalism – by Harsha Walia

Poet of the Dispossessed

Joseph Roth was unwavering in his passion for the vanished Austro-Hungarian Empire, which inspired his greatest novel, his hatred of nationalism, and his prophetic and courageous loathing for the Nazis. About everything else, as a new biography shows, he had violently mixed feelings.

Endless Flight: The Life of Joseph Roth – by Keiron Pim