Tag Archives: Medicine

Sleeping Better: Positions And Environment Matter (Johns Hopkins Medicine)

From Johns Hopkins Medicine:

Johns Hopkins Medicine“The sleep environment is something that can easily be fixed,” Salas says. By giving a little thought to positioning your body and bed, you might find your slumber is even sweeter.

For young, healthy people, sleep position is less important, Salas says. “But as you get older and have more medical issues, sleep position can become positive or negative.”

Consider these factors before you switch off the light:

  • Back and neck pain: When it comes to alleviating pain, sleeping on your back is a mixed bag, Salas says. For people with neck pain, sleeping face up can sometimes make the pain worse. But many people find back sleep is helpful for alleviating low-back pain. If you have soreness in your spine, experiment with different positions and pillows to find what works for you.
  • Snoring and sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea causes the airways to collapse during sleep, leading to pauses in breathing. It often goes hand-in-hand with snoring. Positioning yourself on your side or stomach can help the airways stay open to reduce snoring and alleviate mild apnea, Salas says.
  • Reflux and heartburn: If you suffer from heartburn, sleeping on your right side can make symptoms worse, Salas says. That’s true for people who have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and for people who have heartburn for other reasons, such as pregnant women. Flip to your left side to cool the burn.
  • Appearance: If you sleep on your side or stomach, you’ve probably noticed creases on your face when you wake up. “Over time, that can lead to breakouts or cause chronic changes to the skin,” Salas says. “If you’re concerned about wrinkles, it’s another reason to sleep on your back.”

Don’t underestimate the importance of optimizing your bedroom to help you get a good night’s sleep. Salas adds:

  • Clean sheets: Wash sheets frequently and vacuum the mattress to rid it of dust and dander that can cause allergies and impair your sleep.
  • Close the blinds: Use curtains or blinds to keep the room dim at night. But open the curtains (or head outside) in the morning to reset your internal clock.
  • Location matters: Position your bed so you aren’t facing distractions such as a desk stacked with work or a blinking light.

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Podcasts Interviews: The Diagnosis And Early Treatment Of Covid-19

In this audio interview conducted on June 3, 2020, the editors discuss two new studies: one comparing test swabs collected by health care workers with swabs collected by the patients themselves and one assessing hydroxychloroquine treatment in people who had been exposed to Covid-19 but weren’t yet ill.

The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal.

Eric Rubin is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal. Lindsey Baden is a Deputy Editor of the Journal. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Executive Managing Editor of the Journal.

Coronavirus Vaccines: The Promise And Peril In Fast-Tracking (WSJ Video)

As the coronavirus continues to spread around the globe, companies and academic labs are racing to develop a vaccine that would help society get back to normal. But there could also be costs to moving too quickly.

WSJ’s Daniela Hernandez explains. Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann

Interviews: 67-Year Old Bioscientist And Business CEO Patrick Soon-Shiong “Progress On Covid-19”

Dr. Patrick Soon-ShiongColin Cowherd talks with Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong who is not only a Doctor helping to fight Covid-19 but also owns the LA Times and is a minority owner of the Lakers. Dr. Shiong talks about the things we are learning about the disease and why it is so much more dangerous than previous pandemics.

Dr Patrick Soon-Shiong is a South African-American billionaire surgeon, businessman, media mogul, and bioscientist. He is the inventor of the drug Abraxane, which became known for its efficacy against lung, breast, and pancreatic cancer.

Dr. Soon-Shiong’s Website

The Herd Now Podcasts
THE HERD NOW WEBSITE

Health: “How the Body Clears Covid-19” (Video)

Understanding how the body clears the new coronavirus is becoming more important as the U.S. begins to reopen. WSJ’s Daniela Hernandez explains how the body fights infection and why feeling better doesn’t equal being virus-free.

Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann

New Medical Podcasts: E-Cigarette Deaths, Heart Disease And 10-Weeks To Crush The Curve (NEJM)

New England Journal of Medicine Podcast This WeekFeaturing articles on deaths due to e-cigarette– or vaping-associated lung injury, apixaban for venous thromboembolism in cancer, the management of coronary disease in patients with advanced kidney disease, health-status outcomes in the ISCHEMIA-CKD trial,  and ten weeks to crush the curve. 

Additionally, renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors in patients with Covid-19, and teasing the immune system to repair the heart; a review article on the care of patients with diabetic retinopathy; a case report of a man with high blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and hematuria; and Perspective articles on clinical and social risk adjustment, on prediction models, and on medical care during the pandemic.

Coronavirus: “The Patients Left Behind” (Prognosis Podcast)

Prognosis PodcastDoctors are delaying procedures and surgeries in order to save resources like hospital beds and ventilators for Covid-19 patients, and prevent the infection from spreading.

Emma Court reports on the difficult choices doctors are forced to make, and the danger that we’re creating another health care crisis.

Website

Coronavirus: “Why The U.S. Still Doesn’t Have Enough Tests” (WSJ Podcast)

The Journal WSJ PodcastsTo reopen the economy safely, experts estimate the U.S. will need to administer millions of tests every month.

 WSJ’s Christopher Weaver and Rebecca Ballhaus explain why we are so far from the number of tests needed.

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