Tag Archives: Tours

Boat Tours: Lake Thun In Western Switzerland (8K)

The deep blue Lake Thun is the largest lake in the Bernese Oberland entirely located in the Canton of Bern. It offers views of green meadows, forests, the typical alps as well as the eternally white peaks of the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau beyond. During the summer months and between Christmas and New Year, the steamship Blümlisalp clatters and puffs its way across the clear blue waters of Lake Thun in the middle of this landscape. Your trip on Lake Thus can start at any jetty round Lake Thun. Select the boat trip on Lake Thun that most appeals in terms of departure time or itinerary. Trips leave from Interlaken West and proceed along the Neuhaus nature reserve, on towards the St. Beatus Caves and Beatenbucht, to Spiez, Gunten, Oberhofen, Hilterfingen, Hünibach and then ultimately on to Thun. The entire trip from Interlaken to Thun takes around two hours and 10 minutes.

The Cotswolds: History Of Village Of Charlbury

Nestling in the Evenlode Valley, sequestered down winding B roads but with its own railway station, Charlbury is a vibrant yet picturesque Oxfordshire town. A centre for festivals, full of welcoming pubs, and ideal for walking and cycling, there’s always something going on in Charlbury.

Views: Canal Boat Cruise, Gothenburg, Sweden (4K)

Gothenburg, a major city in Sweden, is situated off the Göta älv river on the country’s west coast. An important seaport, it’s known for its Dutch-style canals and leafy boulevards like the Avenyn, the city’s main thoroughfare, lined with many cafes and shops. Liseberg is a popular amusement park with themed rides, performance venues and a landscaped sculpture garden.

This is a 30-minute canal trip through Gothenburg, Sweden, Scandinavia’s “little amsterdam” and “little london.” This is a Paddan tour which will takes us through the old canals from the 1600s and under low bridges and out of the harbor. Here you will hear about the history of Gothenburg from the knowledgeable guide. During the trip you pass landmarks such as the Opera House, Feskekörka, the lipstick, the old shipyard areas, green parks and Gothenburg Typical old house “Landshövdingehus” in Haga.

Date filmed: Sunday – August 29, 2021

Tours: Rodin Sculptures, Cantor Museum, Stanford

At the time of his death, Auguste Rodin (France, 1840-1917) was counted among the most renowned artists in the world. A century later, after numerous reassessments by generations of art historians, Rodin continues to be recognized for making figurative sculpture modern by redefining the expressive capacity of the human form. This installation spans three galleries and features nearly 100 Rodin sculptures essential to telling his story and representing his groundbreaking engagement with the body. Drawn from the extensive holdings of the Cantor Arts Center, the largest collection of sculptures by Rodin in an American museum, it also presents comparative works by his rivals, mentors, admirers, and imitators.

Check out the Cantor for publications about August Rodin and his works, available for purchase in the Cantor’s Atrium.

Swiss Village Tours: Bauen On Lake Lucerne (4K Video)

Bauen is what can be considered a hidden gem among the Swiss villages. It lays by the shores of the Vierwaldstättersee and is often overlooked. Bauen has a unique climate, it’s usually quite warm during the year. With its Mediterranean vibes and the many palm trees, this village is very inviting to visitors.

Bauen is a former municipality on Lake Lucerne in the Swiss canton of Uri. On 1 January 2021 the former municipality of Bauen merged into the municipality of Seedorf.

Views: A One-Day Tour Of The City Of London By Condé Nast Traveller

Condé Nast Traveller takes a one-day tour of the City of London. Join our photographic director Matthew Buck and chief sub-editor Gráinne McBride as they plan their itinerary around a completely empty St Paul’s Cathedral, a legendary brutalist building, a café selling the UK’s first compostable coffee pods and an excellent chophouse. The pair discover a new perspective of the capital’s City-within-a-city.

Scottish Baronial Estates: Abbotsford House – Built By Sir Walter Scott (1820’s)

Damian Barr explores Sir Walter Scott’s impressive home, Abbotsford, which is full of a fascinating mix of items owned by the famed Scottish novelist, poet, playwright, and historian.

Abbotsford House was built by Sir Walter Scott as his grand home in the Scottish Borders. The property, set on the banks of the River Tweed, was bought in 1811 and then modified to the tastes of Sir Walter Scott. The writer died here in 1832, and the house was opened to the public just five months after his death.

The rooms that you visit today have been left virtually untouched since his death and a visit to Abbotsford House gives you an intimate insight into the personality and interests of this great man. Some of the most interesting aspects of the house are the personal collections of Sir Walter Scott which include unusual items such as the weapons of Rob Roy, the case book of Napoleon, and even a bullet and piece of oatcake taken from the site of Culloden Battlefield.

Visitors can see Sir Walter Scott’s Study, Library, Drawing Room, Entrance Hall, small Armoury, and the Dining Room where he died on 21st September 1832. The dining room contains paintings of several generations of the Scott family. Unfortunately, the last of his bloodline died in 2004 and the care of the house has now been taken over by the Abbotsford Trust.

Museum Tours: Highlights Of The Met Cloisters, NYC

Join curators, conservators, and horticulturists as they discuss some projects they have been working on over the past year and experience the magic of The Met Cloisters.

Featuring: Griffith Mann, Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge, The Met Cloisters Carly Still, Managing Horticulturist, The Met Cloisters Lucretia Kargere, Conservator, The Met Cloisters Julia Perratore, Assistant Curator, The Met Cloisters Yvette Weaver, Assistant Horticulturist, The Met Cloisters

Featured Artwork: Book of Flower Studies, ca. 1510–1515, Made in Tours, France (acc. no. 2019.197) Altar Predella and Socle of Archbishop Don Dalmau de Mur ca. 1456–1458, Made in Saragossa, Aragon, Spain (acc. no. 09.146) Apse from San Martin at Fuentidueña, ca. 1175–1200, Made in Segovia, Castile-León, Spain (L.58.86a–f) Video by Steadfast Productions in association with The Met

Hilltop Village Tours: Assisi In Umbria, Italy

The hill town of Assisi in Umbria is one of Italy’s best preserved medieval villages. The ancient buildings are constructed from a local stone that has slightly pink color enhancing the visual beauty of this special place with a lovely network of pedestrian lanes to explore, some of them so steep they are staircases rather than streets. The main reason that most people visit the town is because it was the home of St. Francis, one of the Catholic Church’s most important saints, who is buried here under the great basilica that was constructed two years after his death in the early 13th century.