Tag Archives: Tours

Cinematic Travel: A Road Trip Through Malaysia

Curves Magazin – A roadtrip through northern and southern Malaysia starting in Kuala Lumpur.

Kuala Lumpur, capital of Malaysia. The city is located in west-central Peninsular (West) Malaysia, midway along the west coast tin and rubber belt and about 25 miles (40 km) east of its ocean port, Port Kelang, on the Strait of Malacca. It is the country’s largest urban area and its cultural, commercial, and transportation centre. In 1972 Kuala Lumpur was designated a municipality, and in 1974 this entity and adjacent portions of surrounding Selangor state became a federal territory.

Kuala Lumpur lies in hilly country astride the confluence of the Kelang and Gombak rivers; its name in Malay means “muddy estuary.” Malaysia’s Main Range rises nearby to the north, east, and southeast. The climate is equatorial, with high temperatures and humidity that vary little throughout the year. The area receives about 95 inches (2,400 mm) of rain annually; June and July are the driest months. Area federal territory, 94 square miles (243 square km). Pop. (2009 est.) city, 1,493,000; (2020) federal territory, 1,982,112.

Indonesia Village Views: Tour of Penglipuran, Bali

DW Travel – A life in harmony with God and nature: What for many is an esoteric ideal is the daily reality in the Indonesian village of Penglipuran – and with godliness comes cleanliness! The village’s inhabitants, some 1,000 people, abide by an ancient philosophy and its traditions: They protect the surrounding rainforest, cars are not allowed in the village, and littering is also forbidden. Over the past years, sustainable tourism has grown in Penglipuran, strengthening the local economy.

Science & Technology: A Tour Of New ‘MIT Museum’

PBS NewsHour – Artificial intelligence, robotics and gene sequencing are the stuff of headlines, science fiction and sometimes even our worst fears. It’s all on view at the new MIT Museum. A place where the latest scientific advancements fill galleries, but only really work with your input. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of GBH Boston looks at this artistic frontier for our arts and culture series, “CANVAS.”

From AI in the home to robots in the workplace, the presence of AI all around us compels us to question its potential and recognize the risks. What has become clear is that the more we advance AI technology and consider machine ability versus human ability, the more we need to mind the gap.

Tours: Waiheke House In Auckland, New Zealand

The Local Project – Through natural material selections, Cheshire Architects has unveiled Waiheke House, a home that embraces its surrounds to become the best modern house in the world. Operating under the rule that grandeur does not need to be shown through scale but rather quality, Waiheke House is a place of respite for its owners with only one and a half bedrooms and a focus on entertaining areas.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Best Modern House in the World 00:45 – An Island Location 01:05 – The Aspect of the House 01:35 – Tasked with Entertaining 02:01 – The House Plan and its Materials 03:39 – Hidden Openings and Passages 04:22 – Bathing Rituals 05:27 – The Goal Behind the Home 05:43 – Creating a Centred Feeling 06:09 – Becoming One with the Environment 06:33 – A Vessel for Experience 06:53 – A Home Made with Real Materials 07:20 – A Love for the Layered Experience

While the views of Waiheke House are only part of what establishes it as the best modern house in the world, it is how the structure inserts itself into the landscape that is awe-inspiring. Focused on evoking the numerous meanings of ‘shelter,’ Waiheke House acts as a platform that can open or close for the watching of the weather as it changes. Comprised of two pavilions, which are slightly offset from one another,

Cheshire Architects have separated the living spaces to designate a place of reprieve and a place to entertain. The larger of the two pavilions, known as the seaward pavilion, is framed by landscaping. Shaped by the stone wall that curves around and holds the home, the idea of anchoring the seaward pavilion is seen through the home’s distinct architectural theme. To make the best modern house in the world feel warm and comfortable, the use of stone, wood and brass help the house insert itself into the surrounding nature. Created for entertaining, the seaward pavilion is intentionally designed to be small, with only a kitchen, large dining section and lounge.

Framed by glass on three sides, doors butterfly open so that the living areas can connect seamlessly with the lawn. Conceptually thought of as a canopy atop a mouth of a cave, Cheshire Architects has formed the best modern house in the world to navigate a spatial dialect that speaks to both broad ocean views and small, contained spaces. Throughout the house tour, it is evident that the selected surfaces and materials are chosen to act as a vessel for experience – an idea that Cheshire Architects hopes will still be embodied in 100 years as the home ages in place.

Seen in the stacked stone of the wall to the layered floor, Cheshire Architects avoids using crisp whites or laminates and instead imbues the home with richness from natural materials. Throughout the second pavilion, the adaption of narrower halls, lower ceilings and darker tones have been employed to create a dynamic internal contrast. Intended as a retreat for the owners, Waiheke House is a place to align and connect with the natural surroundings. By focusing on simple, high-quality design choices over scale, Cheshire Architects has created the best modern house in the world so that it may amplify what already exists.

Home Tours: ‘House At Otago Bay’ In Tasmania

The Local Project (December 27, 2022) – Taking a house tour inside a home made entirely from local and sustainable building materials, Topology Studio offers a rare insight into how a structure becomes one with its surrounds.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Sustainable Home 00:30 – The Architect and The Home Owner 01:00 – The Location 01:19 – A Walkthrough of the Sustainable Home 01:40 – Expanding Spaces Through Shapes 02:27 – A Seamless Connection of Inside and Outside 02:47 – A Home that Sits Quietly and Calmly 03:00 – Using Local Manufacturers 03:21 – Maximising the Benefits of the Natural Elements 04:01 – An Entirely Electric Home 04:13 – Climate Change Impacts and Planning for the Future 04:48 – Minimising Footprints

Sitting atop the land, House at Otago Bay looks out toward the bay and as far as Mount Wellington – offering the owners a home that is flush with the landscape. Modest upon arrival, House at Otago Bay is positioned at the end of the drive with its back towards neighbours and its front facing the opposite bush reserve.

Made of locally sourced bricks, bushfire-resistant timber and glass, the home’s design showcases a passion for building sustainably for the present and future. Entering the home at the main living level, Topology Studio has designed the space to open and focus on unrivalled views of the bay. Though sitting on a narrow site, the insertion of unique architectural and design choices inside a home, such as the continuous curved ceiling, help the home to branch outwards and avoid being marginalised by frames. Stairs that sit off to the side lead down to the lower ground floor, in which a bedroom and ensuite have been partially set into the foundation of the home, offering a distinctive view out across the grass and towards the water’s edge.

With a seamless connection that isn’t often seen inside a home, the external façade blurs the lines between inside and out and adds a layer of connection to the surrounding environment. Sitting quietly and calmly upon the land, the architects have chosen to use tones that reference the rocks, water and greenery of the landscape. Using locally sourced and produced materials inside and out took away the need to import from overseas, avoiding unnecessarily increasing the home’s carbon footprint during construction.

After specifying the Tasmanian brick, Topology Studio positioned the building to maximise sunlight during winter and shield the inside during the summer, while also taking advantage of the expansive views. To cater to the changing temperature inside a home, the masonry and concrete floor provide a high level of thermal mass through the seasons and take away the need for external heating technology.

House at Otago Bay is supplied electricity by the solar panels on the boat house – taking away any need for gas and minimising running costs and impact on the environment. Though inside a home can be thought of as sustainable, Topology Studio has taken the extra step to respect the environment by providing robust materials across both outside and inside – proving that homes can provide longevity for its owners in sustainable and eco-friendly ways

Alaska Tours: Wrangell – St. Elias National Park

Sitting on the edge of Alaska, an 8-hour drive from Anchorage, are the 13.2 million acres that make up Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. The park contains an active volcano, nine of the 16 highest peaks in America and countless glaciers, as well as the last community inside a national park. Jeff Glor reports.

Wrangell-St. Elias is a vast national park that rises from the ocean all the way up to 18,008 ft. At 13.2 million acres, the park is the same size as Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park, and Switzerland combined! Within this wild landscape, people continue to live off the land as they have done for centuries. This rugged, beautiful land is filled with opportunities for adventure.

Architecture: A Walking Tour Of New York City’s Rockefeller Center (AD)

Architectural Digest (December 22, 2022) – Today on AD, architect Adam Rolston takes us on an insightful walking tour of Rockefeller Center, exploring the history and details of New York City’s most famous holiday season destination.

From the history behind the towering art deco 30 Rockefeller Plaza to the iconic ice skating rink and smaller details you may not be aware of, come along as Adam explores and explains everything there is to know about Rockefeller Plaza.

South Of France Views: A Guided Tour Of Antibes

4K Urban Life – A 4K walking tour of Antibes, France. Filmmaker Anius Narkevicius decided to create a real virtual tour with a guide to show you the most iconic places of the ancient city of the French Riviera.

Video timeline: Le Grand Hotel 00:03:06 La Porte De France 00:06:30 Le Ptit Cageot 00:16:41 Socca Bar 00:22:45 Entre 9 Vins Bistrot 00:22:56 The Oldest Neighborhood of the City 00:50:02 Provential Market 00:54:03 Port Vauban 00:58:48 The Nomad Of Antibes 01:04:37 Cap d’Antibes 01:14:31

Meet Cedric, a talented guide who will reveal the secrets of Antibes to you! You will walk along the ancient streets, see the fortress and the magnificent city port. Cedric will tell you many interesting facts and stories about the city and show you the incredible beauty of the Mediterranean coast.

Antibes is a beautiful city on the azure coast of France, located in the middle between Cannes and Nice. The ancient walled city of Antibes is one of the liveliest and most beautiful on the Riviera. It has a relaxed beach vibe all year round, a thriving superyacht port and a gorgeous old town with narrow cobbled streets, markets and cafes. The city is also known as the home of the Spanish artist Pablo Picasso.

Melbourne Architecture: Tour of Hawthorn House

The Local Project (December 16, 2022) – Inside one of Melbourne’s most modern architectural homes, the house tour of Hawthorn House showcases Edition Office’s timeless design. Working with Flux Construction, Edition Office plays with light and shadow to reveal the form and characteristics of the home.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Most Brilliant Architectural Home 00:26 – Playing with Light and Shadow 00:44 – Creating a Family Home 01:47 – Filtering Through the Concrete Shroud 02:00 – Views From Each Living Space 02:24 – The Original Brief 02:59 – A Quick but Complex Build 04:14 – Emulating A Sanctuary with Other Worldly Vibes 04:30 – The Skin of the Building 04:46 – A Balancing Act with The Materials 05:05 – Returning to the Project 05:26 – Proud Moments

Over an 18-month building process, Flux Construction and Edition Office have created a house unlike other modern architectural homes. First seen from the outside, Hawthorn House appears as a monolithic structure yet, on the inside, the family home becomes a private sanctuary for its owners. Similar to other modern architectural homes, Hawthorn House suffered from lack of privacy in its suburban location.

To respond to this need, Edition Office has pushed the skin of the building out from the glass line, which allows for both privacy and the softening of light. Upstairs has been provided more privacy through light volumes, a structural choice between the buildings form and glass line that open up to the sky. Furthermore, the light volumes also provide advantageous views and the experience of seeing the seasons as they change.

Employing unique interior design choices that allow for ease of living, the architect and interior designer have configured downstairs as one singular platform. Offering different experiences, each living area has a differing focus. From the front pavilion, the homing in on the northern light and established lemon gum tree offers the owners a space to connect with their surrounds. Experienced in the more intimate rear pavilion, an inward focus of the home brings a soft and warming essence to the interior. Celebrating the structural form of modern architectural homes, Edition Office and Flux Construction operated with a concise approach when completing the house.

Through the connection of materials, the home is a celebration of concrete, timber and glass, which is observed immediately from the exterior shell. Equally as important as the home, the evolving landscape offers a place of cognitive restoration. With a mixed use of exotic species and natives, the green life helps to provide a comforting space that will continue to grow in place. Over the modern architectural home’s form, Edition Office has provided its clients with complete privacy through a humble material palette and lush landscaping.

Tours: Plas Newydd House Snowdonia, North Wales

National Trust – Set on the shores of the Menai Strait, visitors to the gardens at Plas Newydd in Wales can take in the sea air and enjoy views of Snowdonia.

The gardens, dating back to the 16th century, owe much of their dramatic beauty to landscape designer Humphry Repton who in 1798, who planted trees to make the most of the views. Repton’s legacy influences the way the National Trust cares for the gardens today.

Discover ornate courtyards, a vibrant rhododendron garden and a tree house – features when the 6th Marquess of Anglesey lived at Plas Newydd with his family. You’ll also pick up a gardening tip to help you keep your flower beds happy and healthy over winter. The gardens at Plas Newydd are only open at weekends during the winter.