Tag Archives: Germany

World Economic Forum: “Top Stories Of The Week”

Top Stories of the Week (September 30, 2022) include:

0.15 – China’s trackless trams 01:39 – Germany and Denmark are building the world’s longest undersea tunnel 03:12 Students in the Netherlands have built an electric car that captures carbon 04:09 This tower turns sunlight and air into clean jet fuel

Views: Sanssouci Palace Tour In Potsdam, Germany

How does this sound: A picturesque little castle palace surrounded by wine terraces and a romantic park – and you right in the middle of it all! Join DW reporter Hannah Hummel for a relaxing day in Potsdam. She visits Sanssouci, the pleasure palace of King Frederick the Great. Hannah immerses herself in the atmosphere of the place, very much in the spirit of the Prussian king, who indulged in the good life here, far away from his court. Here he could indulge in nature, music and philosophy without worry – sans souci.

Potsdam, city, capital of Brandenburg Land (state), eastern Germany. Lying on the southwest border of Berlin, it is sited where the Nuthe River flows into the Havel River, the confluence becoming a series of lakes.

First mentioned in 993 as a Slavic settlement known as Poztupimi, it received its charter in 1317. It became Brandenburg’s electoral residence in 1640 under Frederick William (the Great Elector) and the Prussian royal residence under Frederick II (the Great), during whose reign (1740–86) it was an intellectual and military centre and virtual capital of Prussia. In the 18th century a colony of Dutch immigrants gave their quarter of the city, and some other parts as well, a distinctly Dutch flavour. Potsdam suffered severe damage in World War II, but many monuments survived and others have been restored. The Cecilienhof Palace was the scene (July 17–August 2, 1945) of the Potsdam Conference of the Allied leaders; it now houses a museum and a memorial, as well as a hotel. From 1952 to 1990 the city was capital of the Potsdam Bezirk (district) of East Germany.

Oktoberfest Views: What It’s Like To Be A Beer Server

7 million liters of beer are drunk on average during Munich’s Oktoberfest . A tough job for the waiters who are serving the tables in the festival tents. Especially, if you’re an absolute beginner like Euromaxx reporter Brant Dennis. His challenge: to work as a server for one day, carrying 10 one-liter-mugs of beer at a time like the pros. Will he make it?

Travel & Culture: Visiting Munich’s Oktoberfest

Following a two-year break, Munich’s Oktoberfest is back! Dhruv Rathee and partner Juli visit the world’s largest Volksfest. The 17-day event kicks off with the traditional ‘parade of Wiesn landlords and breweries”.

Video timeline: 0:00 Intro 0:47 What is the Oktoberfest? 1:48 Parade of Wiesn landlords and breweries 2:58 A brief history of the Oktoberfest 3:39 Getting there 4:50 Dirndl and lederhosen 5:52 O’zaft is! – the opening tradition 7:10 Beer tents 8:28 Food 10:17 Rides and attractions 11:29 Tips for families

Dressed in their dirndls and lederhosen, they explore the many rides and attractions on the Wiesn – the field where it all takes place. Along with sampling some culinary delights, they of course have to drop in to one of the famous beer tents.

Walking Tour: Weinheim In Western Germany (4K)

WEINHEIM, a town of Germany, in the grand-duchy of Baden, pleasantly situated on the Bergstrasse at the foot of the Odenwald, 11 m. N. of Heidelberg by the railway to Frankfort-on-Main. Pop. (1905) 12,560. It is still in part surrounded by the ruins of its ancient walls. The Gothic town hall; the ruins of the Castle of Windeck and the modern castle of the counts of Berckheim; the house of the Teutonic Order; and three churches are the principal buildings. The town has various manufactures, notably leather, machinery and soap, and cultivates fruit and wine. It is a favourite climatic health resort and a great tourist centre for excursions in the Odenwald range. Weinheim is mentioned in chronicles as early as the 8th century, when it was a fief of the abbey of Lorsch, and it was fortified in the 14th century. In the Thirty Years’ War it was several times taken and plundered, and its fortifications dismantled.

German Castles: Secrets Of Neuschwanstein (DW)

Prince Leopold of Bavaria takes you on an exclusive tour of the famous castle commissioned by his ancestor, King Ludwig II, who had the castle built in the picturesque landscape of the Bavarian Allgäu in the 19th century. Today, the castle is one of Germany’s most famous tourist attractions and is famous all over the world. On his guided tour, the prince will share 5 lesser-known facts about Neuschwanstein!

Stories: Monsoon Rains Overwhelm Pakistan, Germany Recession Fears

A.M. Edition for Sep. 7. Abnormally heavy monsoon rains have left 10% of Pakistan underwater and millions displaced.

Wall Street Journal reporter Saeed Shah explains how Pakistan wants the international community to help with the response. Plus, a top banker in Europe warns of recession in Germany. Luke Vargas hosts.

Travel Preview: Discover Germany Switzerland & Austria – September 2022

print-image

Discover Germany, Issue 97, September 2022

The September issue of Discover Germany, Austria & Switzerland starts off with a special focus on exploring the mountains in a wheelchair. It further includes a feature about Switzerland’s Whisky Trail, a whisky hiking trail that winds and weaves its way through scenic Alpine terrain, while exploring the warming drink. Further topics covered in our brand-new September issue are a focus on caravanning holidays through the eyes of actor Simon Böer, great products made in Switzerland, a focus on mindfulness, a look at Germany’s software industry, top travel tips, hotel recommendations, and much more.

Read magazine online

Travel Guides: Wartburg Castle, Central Germany

Wartburg Castle, located close to Eisenach in Thuringia, is also known as “The Castle of the Germans”. But why? DW’s Hannah Hummel shows you around the castle, which is more than 1,000 years old. A fascinating journey to the times of minstrels, knights and ladies of castles – and to the famous Protestant Martin Luther, who translated the bible at Wartburg Castle.

Walking Tour: Merseburg In Northeastern Germany

Merseburg, city, Saxony-Anhalt Land (state), eastern Germany. It lies on the left bank of the Saale River, just south of Halle. Founded about 800 as a frontier fortress against the Slavs, it was a favourite residence of the German kings Henry I the Fowler (d. 936), Otto I, and Henry II.

It was the seat of a bishop from 968 until the Reformation (1561) and was chartered in 1188. It passed to Saxony in 1561 and was captured (1631) by the Swedes in the Thirty Years’ War. The residence of the dukes of Saxe-Merseburg from 1656 to 1738, it passed to Prussia in 1815. It was heavily bombed in World War II.

Merseburg’s most notable buildings are the imposing castle (1480–89) and the cathedral, begun in 1015 and dating mainly from the 13th and 16th centuries. Today there is a technical university (now part of Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg) in Merseburg. The city’s industries include aluminum foil production.