Tag Archives: WSJ

Technology & Society: “The Future Of Police Training” (WSJ Podcast)

The Future of Everything WSJ PodcastIn recent weeks, protests have erupted in response to police violence against citizens – specifically communities of color – forcing departments to reconsider how officers do their jobs. Police forces have been using tech – like Tasers and body cameras – to try and reduce the use of lethal force and improve accountability.

In this episode, we’ll explore how emerging technology – like virtual reality training – could improve police training by boosting empathy and tackling racial bias.

Transportation: “How Covid-19 Is Changing Everyday Commuting”

Traveling on trains and buses means potential exposure to the coronavirus, so cities are racing to make their public transit systems safe. WSJ explores how things like sanitizing robots, working from home and expanded bike lanes are changing our commutes. Video/Illustration: Jaden Urbi and Zoë Soriano.

Coronavirus Vaccines: The Promise And Peril In Fast-Tracking (WSJ Video)

As the coronavirus continues to spread around the globe, companies and academic labs are racing to develop a vaccine that would help society get back to normal. But there could also be costs to moving too quickly.

WSJ’s Daniela Hernandez explains. Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann

Covid-19 Podcasts: “Is Banning Certain Events the Key to Reopening?”

WSJ PodcastsA bar in the Swiss Alps. A megachurch in South Korea. Scientists are focusing on certain superspreading events that might be responsible for an outsized portion of coronavirus cases.

Bojan Pancevski explains how this understanding could be key to reopening.

Business Podcasts: “How One Airline Sees The Future Of Flying” (WSJ)

WSJ PodcastsAirlines have strained to survive after travel dried up because of the coronavirus pandemic. WSJ’s Alison Sider explains how airlines are adjusting, and the CEO of Southwest Airlines paints a picture of what the future of flying might look like.

Travel: RV Vacations Just Might Be The Safest Option This Summer (WSJ)

From a Wall Street Journal article (May 16, 2020):

Wall Street JournalOriginally, we were going to make it a six-day trip,” said Mr. Goble, “but we were honestly having such a good time we extended it four times into an 11-day trip.” Normally, rental companies’ full calendars preclude such spontaneity. Thanks to the motorhome’s self-sustainable features, they stayed overnight at a campground just twice on the trip. Most of the time they’d “boondock”—that is, stop at places without water or electrical hookups, or nightly fees. Say, creekside clearings off fire roads deep in the forest.

RV Vacations - Wall Street Journal - Steve Scott Illustration - May 16 2020

“We have been flooded with new inquiries, and an unusually high number of longer rentals (lasting from one to three months in duration),” said Mr. Ward. “I think this is going to be the trend for the remainder of 2020 and 2021, at a minimum.” One couple, he said, just booked their RV for a three-month loop around the deep South on short notice. “Neither have work to do right now due to the virus, so they’re like, ‘There’s no better time. We’ve always wanted to travel in an Airstream. This works for us now.’”

In a season when the urge to escape home will only be matched by the need to be flexible, getting lost in America in an RV works for a lot of people right now. Mr. Rybak and Ms. O’Hara are still hoping to tick at least one national park off their list in the next few months. They even have a campsite reserved. If you see them, say “Hi.” From a safe distance.

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Economy: “The U.S. Is Racking Up Debt. Will It Be a Problem?” (WSJ Podcast)

The Journal WSJ PodcastsThe federal government is spending big to combat the economic damage of the coronavirus crisis, and federal debt has climbed to record levels. 

WSJ’s Jon Hilsenrath explains the debate over the impact of all that debt.

 

Health: “How the Body Clears Covid-19” (Video)

Understanding how the body clears the new coronavirus is becoming more important as the U.S. begins to reopen. WSJ’s Daniela Hernandez explains how the body fights infection and why feeling better doesn’t equal being virus-free.

Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann

Interviews: 69-Year Old Film Producer & Media CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg

From WSJ Magazine:

WSJ MagazineA person who is one of the great mentors of my career and my time in the entertainment industry was Kirk Douglas. He said to me many decades ago the words that became the most important, most valuable in my lifetime, and the ones that right now mean more today than they ever meant before. He said, “Jeffrey, you haven’t learned to live until you’ve learned how to give.” The wisdom of that and the importance of that has never meant more to me than now. 

What’s it like to launch a $1.8 billion streaming platform in the middle of a pandemic? “Everything about it is upside down and inside out,” says Jeffrey Katzenberg, 69, who debuted the short-form video company Quibi on April 6. Katzenberg is the co-founder of the app along with CEO Meg Whitman, and originally envisioned mobile-based Quibi to fill the “in-between” moments of life—waiting in line, taking the subway—with episodes that wrap in 10 minutes or less.

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