Tag Archives: Ukraine War

Analysis: The World Ahead 2023 – The Economist

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Ten trends to watch in the coming year

A letter from Tom Standage, editor of “The World Ahead 2023”

1. All eyes on Ukraine. Energy prices, inflation, interest rates, economic growth, food shortages—all depend on how the conflict plays out in the coming months. Rapid progress by Ukraine could threaten Vladimir Putin, but a grinding stalemate seems the most likely outcome. Russia will try to string out the conflict in the hope that energy shortages, and political shifts in America, will undermine Western support for Ukraine.

2. Recessions loom. Major economies will go into recession as central banks raise interest rates to stifle inflation, an after-effect of the pandemic since inflamed by high energy prices. America’s recession should be relatively mild; Europe’s will be more brutal. The pain will be global as the strong dollar hurts poor countries already hit by soaring food prices.

3. Climate silver lining. As countries rush to secure their energy supplies, they are turning back to dirty fossil fuels. But in the medium term the war will accelerate the switch to renewables as a safer alternative to hydrocarbons supplied by autocrats. As well as wind and solar, nuclear and hydrogen will benefit too.

4. Peak China? Some time in April China’s population will be overtaken by India’s, at around 1.43bn. With China’s population in decline, and its economy facing headwinds, expect much discussion of whether China has peaked. Slower growth means its economy may never overtake America’s in size.

5. Divided America. Although Republicans did worse than expected in the midterm elections, social and cultural divides on abortion, guns and other hot-button issues continue to widen after a string of contentious Supreme Court rulings. Donald Trump’s formal entry into the 2024 presidential race will pour fuel on the fire.

6. Flashpoints to watch. The intense focus on the war in Ukraine heightens the risk of conflict elsewhere. With Russia distracted, conflicts are breaking out in its backyard. China may decide that there will never be a better time to make a move on Taiwan. India-China tensions could flare in the Himalayas. And might Turkey try to nab a Greek island in the Aegean?

7. Shifting alliances. Amid geopolitical shifts, alliances are responding. nato, revitalised by the war in Ukraine, will welcome two new members. Will Saudi Arabia join the Abraham accords, an emerging bloc? Other groupings of growing importance include the Quad and aukus (two American-led clubs intended to deal with China’s rise) and i2u2—not a rock band, but a sustainability forum linking India, Israel, the United Arab Emirates and the United States.

8. Revenge tourism. Take that, covid! As travellers engage in post-lockdown “revenge” tourism, traveller spending will almost regain its 2019 level of $1.4trn, but only because inflation has pushed up prices. The actual number of international tourist trips, at 1.6bn, will still be below the pre-pandemic level of 1.8bn in 2019. Business travel will remain weak as firms cut costs.

9. Metaverse reality check. Will the idea of working and playing in virtual worlds catch on beyond video games? 2023 will provide some answers as Apple launches its first headset and Meta decides whether to change its strategy as its share price languishes. Meanwhile, a less complicated and more immediately useful shift may be the rise of “passkeys” to replace passwords.

10. New year, new jargon. Never heard of a passkey? Fear not! Turn to our special section, “Understand This”, which rounds up the vital vocabulary that will be useful to know in 2023. nimbys are out and yimbys are in; cryptocurrencies are uncool and post-quantum cryptography is hot; but can you define a frozen conflict, or synfuel? We’ve got you covered.

Views: The New York Times Magazine – Nov 6, 2022

Inside the 11.6.22 Issue:

The Democrats’ Last Stand in Wisconsin

With the G.O.P. in control of a majority of statehouses, Democrats are fighting for seats in battleground states. Is it too late?

The Untold Story of ‘Russiagate’ and the Road to War in Ukraine

Russia’s meddling in Trump-era politics was more directly connected to the current war than previously understood.

A Championship Season in Mariachi Country

Every year along the Texas border, high school teams battle it out in one of the nation’s most intense championship rivalries. But they’re not playing football.

Travel: Touring Central And Eastern Europe (DW)

From Germany via Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary to Rumania – that’s the route our two DW reporters Shabnam Surita and Laila Abdalla took. They travelled all the way through Central and Eastern Europe to find out how the Russian war against Ukraine is affecting tourism in its neighboring countries.

Cities visited: Wroclaw, Prague, Bratislava, Budapest and Timisoara.

Ukraine War Analysis: Time Magazine – Oct 10, 2022

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Inside the Ukrainian Counterstrike That Turned the Tide of the War

What to Know About the Protests Over Mahsa Amini’s Death

Is the Crypto Community in Puerto Rico Helping or Hurting After Hurricane Fiona?

Republicans Reveal Immigration Agenda Ahead of Midterms

News: Putin Mobilizes And Escalates War, Protests In Iran, Zurich Film Festival

Vladimir Putin mobilizes more troops in the biggest escalation of the war in Ukraine since the invasion. Plus: protests in Iran continue after the death of a woman in police custody, the latest climate news, and the Zürich Film Festival kicks off.

Preview: The Atlantic Magazine – October 2022

The Atlantic October 2022 Issue:

Ukraine defiant: George Packer, Anne Applebaum, and Franklin Foer on democracy’s front lines. Plus the myopia generation, the Benin bronzes’ contested return, Ian McEwan’s anti-memoir, cursive’s demise, redshirting boys, John Roberts v. the Voting Rights Act, the GOP’s extremist history, and more.

Six months into Ukraine’s defiant stand against Russia’s invasion, The Atlantic is publishing a special cover package devoted to life in the country and the state of the war, with new, on-the-ground reporting by staff writers George Packer, Anne Applebaum, and Franklin Foer. Packer, Applebaum, and Foer are three of the most influential and established voices on the perils of war, authoritarian threats to democracy, and Ukrainian and Russian politics.

News: Ukraine’s Defenses Improve As Costs Mount, China’s Economy Slows

A.M. Edition for Aug. 15. Ukraine’s battlefield defense against Russia may be gradually strengthening, but the country is facing a widening financial shortfall.

WSJ reporter Marcus Walker says Kyiv has been forced to print money to cover the cost of fighting Russia’s invasion, which has pummeled Ukraine’s economy. Luke Vargas hosts.

Morning News: World Food Insecurity, Horn Of Africa, Rise Of U.S. Dollar

A.M. Edition for July 14. The World Food Program says higher food and fuel costs, due in part to the war in Ukraine, have pushed an additional 47 million people into food insecurity since March.

WSJ Africa deputy bureau chief Gabriele Steinhauser discusses the impact in the Horn of Africa. Plus, a look at what is behind the strength of the U.S. dollar against the euro and the yen. Annmarie Fertoli hosts.

Morning News: Ukraine War & Future Conflicts, Italian Bank ‘Doom Loop’

A.M. Edition for July 6. Military strategists are learning in real time how future wars will be fought. WSJ Brussels bureau chief Dan Michaels explains how the war in Ukraine could shape future conflicts. Plus, the doom cycle haunting Italian banks. Luke Vargas hosts.

Morning News: Ukraine’s Losses In Donbas, Prison Radio, CBD Use In Japan

Russia is making steady, piecemeal gains in the region; Ukrainian forces are simply outgunned. That disparity defines the war’s progression—for now.

More than 20 countries have radio stations run by and for prisoners, giving those inside a voice. And why a cannabis derivative is proving popular among Japan’s elderly.