Tag Archives: Arts

Art History: Whistler’s ‘Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac’

In the final episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator Xavier F. Salomon bids audiences farewell with a discussion of “Arrangement in Black and Gold: Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac” by James McNeill Whistler, the best-represented artist at the Frick with twenty works in the collection. Whistler met the eccentric poet and aristocrat depicted in the painting in 1885, and they soon became fast friends, with Montesquiou sitting for the portrait in 1891–92, making it the most modern work on display at Frick Madison. This week’s complementary cocktail is the Black Manhattan, a spin-off of the cocktail from the very first episode of “Cocktails with a Curator.” Xavier, Aimee, and Giulio extend their thanks to all those who made this program possible and, of course, to you, the viewers—cheers! To view this painting (or object) in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/whistlerblackgold

The Arts: Rembrandt And The History Of Mahogany

In the inaugural episode of “Where in the World?,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the history of mahogany, a material hidden beneath the surface of a Rembrandt portrait and sourced oceans away from the famed artist’s homeland.

The Frick’s temporary move to Frick Madison has prompted new ways of looking at our works of art. The reframing of the collection sheds light on the fact that the Frick’s art, although predominantly European, is undeniably linked to the world beyond Europe. In this series, we’re exploring some of these stories, asking “where in the world” we can find new connections to familiar objects.

To view the Rembrandt painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/rembrandtruts

Profiles: British Artist Aimee Lax (V&A Museum)

Aimee Lax is an artist whose work examines the fragility and strength of the natural world, showing how it can be simultaneously threatening and beautiful. During her residency she has focussed on the question of the Anthropocene, looking at the burial of nuclear waste and the strange morphological effects on organisms in areas exposed to nuclear radiation. Creating works which convey a sense of otherworldliness and the uncanny, she uses clay to illustrate the dangers of the past, present and future. Engaging Ceramics Artist in Residence October 2019 – July 2020.

British Masterpieces: ‘Purfleet And The Essex Shore’ By J.M.W. Turner

Travel back in time to J.M.W. Turner’s Harley Street gallery before immersing yourself in one of the finest seascapes ever painted by a British artist. Movie trailer legend Nick Ellsworth reads from Poet Laureate John Masefield’s ‘Sea Fever’ as we set sail across the mouth of the River Thames to explore Turner’s masterpiece. ‘Purfleet and the Essex Shore as seen from Long Reach’ established Turner’s reputation as the greatest marine painter of the modern age.

Art Profile: Wall Writing Artist ‘Prime’ (Getty Video)

Prime is considered one of the most influential artists in the history of Los Angeles wall writing. He uses unorthodox methods for graffiti painting, incorporating rollers, brushes, and experimental materials while combining traditional graffiti and gang-styled writing with calligraphy.

Writing on walls has existed in many forms since ancient times, with examples of graffiti dating back to ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Discover the work of Prime, one of Los Angeles’s most influential street artists, and explore the artist’s practice and his interplay of words and images, a tradition that began thousands of years ago.

Learn more about this artist and the program “Writing on the Wall” https://www.getty.edu/museum/programs…

Los Angeles Views: Getty Center & Museum Reopens

Welcome back to the Getty Center. There’s something for everyone! Come enjoy art, modern design, unique gardens, and spectacular city views.

The Getty Center, in Los Angeles, California, is a campus of the Getty Museum and other programs of the Getty Trust. The $1.3 billion Center opened to the public on December 16, 1997 and is well known for its architecture, gardens, and views overlooking Los Angeles. 

Artwork: ‘Flowers In A Terracotta Vase’ By Jan Van Huysum (1682-1749)

Lucy Chiswell, the Dorset Curatorial Fellow, explores Van Huysum’s ‘Flowers in a Terracotta Vase’ in ten minutes.

Jan van Huysum, also spelled Huijsum (15 April 1682 – 8 February 1749), was a Dutch painter.

INTERNATIONAL ART: ‘APOLLO MAGAZINE – MAY 2021’

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Michael Rakowitz interviewed by Daniel TrillingJon Day on smell and the visual arts; Susan Moore catches up with art collector and former Louvre director Pierre Rosenberg; Oliver Cox on country-house exhibitions in museums; Debika Ray assesses Narendra Modi’s architectural shake-up of New Delhi
REVIEWS | Kitty Hauser on new Australian art in Sydney; Matt Stromberg evaluates LACMA’s experimental rehang; Tom Fleming on the life of John Craxton; Clare Bucknell on a study of women’s self-portraits; Glenn Adamson on a history of Western ceramics; Mark Francis on Richard Hamilton, Pop pioneer
 
MARKET | Stephen OngpinThomas Dane and François Chantala consider the future of London’s galleries and fairs; and the latest art market columns from Susan MooreEmma Crichton-Miller and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Xavier F. Salomon finds a lost Valadier masterpiece in Nicaragua; Isabella Smith visits imperial China through her TV screen; Samuel Reilly on Joan Eardley in GlasgowCharles Holland on the post-war buildings of Raymond Erith; Thomas Marks on Daniel Spoerri’s tableaux of tables; and Robert O’Byrne picks over Apollo’s wartime diet

Cocktails with a Curator: Whistler’s “Lady Meux”

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the turbulent life of the woman portrayed in James McNeill Whistler’s serene “Harmony in Pink and Gray: Portrait of Lady Meux,” currently on view on the fourth floor of Frick Madison. A former bartender and actress, Lady Meux was shunned by London polite society even after she married Sir Henry Bruce Meux, heir to a huge brewery fortune. This week’s complementary cocktail is a refreshing Mummy, a nod to her extensive collection of some 1,800 Egyptian and Assyrian objects, including an infamous mummy of Nesmin.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/ladymeux