Tag Archives: Museums

Top New Exhibitions: “The Last Knight” At The Metropolitan Museum, NYC Through Jan 5, 2020

From the MetMuseum.org online:

The Last Knight Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition BookThe Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I examines the profound significance of European armor at the dawn of the Renaissance, through the lens of Emperor Maximilian I’s (1459–1519) remarkable life. On view only at The Met, The Last Knight coincides with the five-hundredth anniversary of Maximilian’s death, and is the most ambitious North American loan exhibition of European arms and armor in decades. Including 180 objects selected from some thirty public and private collections in Europe, the Middle East, and the United States, The Last Knight will explore how Maximilian’s unparalleled passion for the trappings and ideals of knighthood served his boundless worldly ambitions, imaginative stratagems, and resolute efforts to forge a lasting personal and family legacy.

This exhibition features many works of art on view outside Europe for the first time, including Maximilian’s own sumptuous armors that highlight his patronage of the greatest European armorers of his age, as well as related manuscripts, paintings, sculpture, glass, tapestry, and toys, all of which emphasize the emperor’s dynastic ambitions and the centrality of chivalry at the imperial court and beyond.

To read more: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/last-knight-art-armor-ambition-maximilian?utm_source=Exhibitions&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019_1019_Met_Exhibitions

New Paris Museums: Bourse De Commerce – Pinault Collection To Open In June 2020

From an Art Forum online article:

Bourse de Commerce—Pinault Collection by Maxime TétardThe plans for the venue were previously reported to encompass 9,850 square feet of exhibition space, a black-box theater, and an auditorium. Earlier this year, Pinault said he wants the museum to complement existing art institutions in Paris, and that he will collaborate with the Centre Pompidou on a program that will take place concurrently at both venues in 2020.

The French billionaire art collector François Pinault announced that his $170 million contemporary art museum in Paris is slated to open next June near the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou. The Bourse de Commerce—Pinault Collection will be housed in the city’s old stock exchange, in a building designed by the Pritzker Prize–winning architect Tadao Ando, and is to host ten exhibitions a year drawing from Pinault’s collection.

To read more: https://www.artforum.com/news/francois-pinault-to-open-contemporary-art-museum-in-paris-in-june-2020-81017

Top Museum Exhibits: “Greco” At The Grand Palais, Paris On Oct 16

Saint Francis Receiving the Stigmata (c. 1585), El Greco.Rediscovered in the late 19th century, celebrated by authors, acknowledged and embraced by the 20th century avant-garde, the artist has enjoyed the dual prestige of tradition and modernity, linking Titian to the Fauvists and Mannerism to Cubism, Expressionism, Vorticism and Abstraction up to the Action painting.

This retrospective is the first major exhibition in France ever to be dedicated to this artist.

Born in Crete in 1541, Domenico Theotokopoulos, known as El Greco, undertook his initial apprenticeship in the Byzantine tradition before refining his training in Venice and then Rome. However, it was in Spain that his art flourished, firmly taking root from the 1577s. Attracted by the incredible promise of the El Escorial site, the artist brought Titian’s colour, Tintoretto’s audacity and Michelangelo’s heroic style. This eloquent combination, original yet consistent with his own way, gave El Greco (who died four years after Caravaggio) a unique place in the history of painting, as the last grand master of the Renaissance and the first great painter of the Golden Age.

Website: https://www.grandpalais.fr/en/event/greco

Cultural Events: Museum Of Modern Art (MoMA) Reopens On October 21

From a New York Curbed.com online article:

MoMA Reopens Curbed NYThere’s also a special focus on architecture and design in this new approach to the collection: Several galleries are devoted to various aspects of those fields, including “The Vertical City,” an examination of skyscraper construction that includes photos by Berenice Abbott, Hugh Ferriss’s architectural drawings, and other ephemera. Elsewhere, building models of the Guggenheim and a spec design of MoMA by modernist master William Lescaze emphasize the importance of architecture to museums, and vice versa.

…the museum is about to reveal its most ambitious revamp yet: On October 21, MoMA will open its expanded headquarters, which now takes up most of the block on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth avenues. The museum has pushed westward, opening more than 40,000 square feet of fresh galleries in both a ground-up building (which rose from the ashes of the Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects-designed American Folk Art Museum) and the base of Jean Nouvel’s supertall skyscraper next door.

The galleries aren’t all that’s been added, though: The museum has also opened a new, expansive lobby—which has two galleries that can be visited free of charge—as well as a spacious gift shop that has been relocated below street level. A wall of windows gives passersby a glimpse into the space, and is intended as a gesture of “increased transparency,” according to the museum.

To read more: https://ny.curbed.com/2019/10/11/20908427/museum-of-modern-art-expansion-open-photos

 

Top Museum Exhibits: “Paris In The Belle Époque”, Norton Simon Museum Through March 2, 2020

From the Norton Simon Museum website:

Belle-EpoqueBy Day & by Night: Paris in the Belle Époque surveys the rich range of artistic responses to life in the French capital through a selection of paintings, drawings, prints and photographs from the Museum’s collections. Together these works of art demonstrate that visual artists participated in the inventive spirit of the age by interpreting the everyday as something extraordinary.

The belle époque, a French expression meaning “beautiful era,” refers to the interwar years between 1871 and 1914, when Paris was at the forefront of urban development and cultural innovation. During this time Parisians witnessed the construction of the Eiffel Tower, the ascendancy of the Montmartre district as an epicenter for art and entertainment and the brightening of their metropolis under the glow of electric light. From the nostalgic perspective of the twentieth century, this four-decade period of progress and prosperity was a golden age of spectacle and joie de vivre.

To read more: https://www.nortonsimon.org/exhibitions/2010-2019/by-day-and-by-night-paris-in-the-belle-epoque/

New Museums: San Francisco Historical Society Museum Opens Oct 7 In The Old Mint

From a San Francisco Chronicle online article:

As trivia game experts know, San Francisco has had three U.S. mints. The first mint, on Commercial Street, was replaced in 1874 by a grand structure at Fifth and Mission streets. That building, now called the Old Mint, was itself replaced in 1937 by a new mint on Duboce Avenue, which is still coining money,

San Francisco Historical Society Museum Opening 2019

The newest museum in San Francisco will open in the city’s oldest mint this week.

The Commercial Street building is built on the site of the first U.S. mint in the West, which opened in 1854 during the California Gold Rush to turn nuggets and gold dust into coins and bullion. Later it was used as a subtreasury, where the government stored millions of dollars in gold and silver bars.

To read more: https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/nativeson/article/SF-s-newest-museum-is-opening-in-the-city-s-14494442.php

Walking Cambridge: Jesus College, St. John’s, Punting The Cam And King’s College

After a great early morning workout at the Varsity Hotel gym, a hearty breakfast, we set out for Jesus College just 5 blocks away.

We were practically alone this Monday morning viewing a spectacular, little known and no entrance charge College.

Then it was off to tour St. John’s College, one of the wealthiest and historical at Cambridge.

It was time to Punt the River Cam and we negotiated a reduced rate of 40 pounds for the two of us.

It was mostly sunny during the 45 minute shared ride up and back on the Cam. So fun. A must in Cambridge.

We had a short walk to Trinity College and a tour (free) of the Wren Library. But we bought (another) Chelsea Bun at Fitzbilies on the way to eat after.

Amazing exhibit inside the Wren and we walked out to eat the bun and some mini croissant sandwiches on a bench overlooking the Cam. Incredible views.

We then took a long walk around the “other” side of the Cam before crossing back to drink some gin and tonics at the Bath House pub.

It was then time for the final, and most spectacular, tour….King’s College and world famous Chapel.

Stunning is the only word for the King’s College Chapel, the Wired’s largest fan-vaulted ceiling and breath-taking stained glass.

An amazing day.