Category Archives: Nature

Nature Views: Sandhill Cranes & Chicks Near Titusville, Florida (Video)

On this Mother’s Day “Sunday Morning” takes us among sandhill cranes and their chicks in Titusville, Florida. Videographer: Doug Jensen.

The sandhill crane is a species of large crane of North America and extreme northeastern Siberia. The common name of this bird refers to habitat like that at the Platte River, on the edge of Nebraska’s Sandhills on the American Plains.

Titusville is a city and the county seat of Brevard County, Florida, United States. The city’s population was 43,761 as of the 2010 United States Census. Titusville is located along the Indian River, west of Merritt Island and the Kennedy Space Center, and south-southwest of the Canaveral National Seashore.

Views: Wildflowers In Mason County, Texas

“Sunday Morning” takes us to Mason County, Texas, for a look at bluebonnets and wildflowers. Videographer: Scot Miller.

Mason County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. At the 2010 census, its population was 4,012. Its county seat is Mason. The county is named for Fort Mason, which was located in the county. 

Cinematic Views: ‘Dance Of Shadows In Japan’ (Video)

During a three month journey travelling and working on organic farms in Japan, filmmaker Steve Atkins often found himself distracted by the beauty around him. As sunlight filtered through the trees that towered over him, their silhouette gracing the surface beneath or ahead him, he felt repeatedly drawn and connected with the Natural world — an effect of Komorebi performing itself on the peripheries.

There is a magical quality to the animate expression of Nature; a mutual puppet-show hosted between trees, light and wind. “When I paused long enough to take it all in, to share in a humble celebration of Nature’s playfulness, I was gifted with a potent ease,” Atkins shares…

Continue reading: https://www.nowness.asia/story/komore…

Nature: ‘The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act’ – Benefits To Texas Habitats

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act is a bipartisan bill that would provide $1.4 billion to state and tribal wildlife conservation initiatives to support at-risk wildlife populations and their habitats. The funding would come from existing revenues and would not require any new taxes.

Texas would receive more than $50 million per year for projects to conserve vulnerable wildlife like the much-loved Texas horned lizard, our state fish the Guadalupe bass, and many songbirds and coastal birds. This funding will also help recover species that are already endangered, such as sea turtles and the Whooping crane. The additional resources are urgently needed to aid fish and wildlife populations under increasing pressure from habitat loss, invasive species, emerging diseases, and extreme weather events in Texas and throughout the country.

Wildfires: New Forests In Alaska Have Increased Carbon Sequestration

It’s no secret that warming temperatures are transforming landscapes in extreme northern regions. In Alaska, where wildfires have burned through many old-growth spruce forests in the past half decade, deciduous trees—such as aspen and birch—are starting to take over. But little is known about the impact these changes will have on how much carbon the forests release and store.

To find out, researchers trudged through the Alaskan taiga, seeking out wildfire sites where spruce once dominated. They mined these sites for information on carbon and nitrogen stores and forest turnover over time. What they found surprised them: In the long run, their estimates suggest that intensifying heat and more wildfires may lead to more carbon sequestration in Alaskan forests, they report today in Science. It’s impossible to know for sure that the flames will subside, but it’s a bit of good news as the fires burn out the old growth and bring in the new.

Read the research: https://scim.ag/3soUc4e

Views: ‘Cherry Blossom Mountain Park’ – Japan

“Sunday Morning” takes us this spring Sunday to a setting known in English as “Cherry Blossom Mountain Park” outside Tokyo, home to some 10,000 cherry trees. Videographer: Jiro Akiba.

The aptly named Sakurayama Park, which translates to Cherry Blossom Mountain Park, has around 10,000 cherry trees. The park has around 7,000 Fuyuzakura cherry trees, which bloom in the winter and the spring, as well as around 3,000 Yoshino cherry trees which bloom in the spring. During the blooming periods, the park is lit up at night, giving it a surreal, fluffy appearance. Tea ceremony events are held in the daytime during peak viewing seasons.

Views: Faughan Valley, Northern Ireland (Video)

The Faughan Valley runs from the foothills of the Sperrin Mountains along the beautiful River Faughan to the outskirts of the city. Covering some 80 square miles, it has been identified as an area of strategic importance thanks to some precious natural features. The river and its tributaries have well-earned environmental designations in recognition of the huge variety of plants and animals. And pockets of precious ancient woodland – a habitat even rarer in Northern Ireland than elsewhere in the UK – dot this famously scenic land.