Health Infographics: How Exercise Creates “New Neurons In Aging Brains”

New Neurons in Aging Brains Scientific American January 2020 Tami Tolpa

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Researchers have also documented clear links between aerobic exercise and benefits to other parts of the brain, including expansion of the prefrontal cortex, which sits just behind the forehead. Such augmentation of this region has been tied to sharper executive cognitive functions, which involve aspects of planning, decision-making and multitasking—abilities that, like memory, tend to decline with healthy aging and are further degraded in the presence of Alzheimer’s. Scientists suspect that increased connections between existing neurons, rather than the birth of new neurons, are responsible for the beneficial effects of exercise on the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions outside the hippocampus.

Scientific American article

New Travel Videos: “Nox Atacama II” In Chile, South America By Martin Heck

Filmed and Edited by: Martin Heck

Home to the darkest and cleanest skies in the world, the Atacama Desert offers views to the nightsky like no other. 2 years after the very successful first video “Nox Atacama” we return to this magnificent region and get rewarded with uncountable numbers of stars and fantastic nebulae in one of the most quiet a empty places on earth. Not a single noise distracts from the grand show the nightsky has to offer.

Nox Atacama II Travel Video in Chile by Martin Heck January 12 2020
Filmed over a month in Mar/April 2019, I worked in freezing temperatures, altitudes up to 5200m/17000ft, salt lakes and icy slopes. The Atacama is not welcoming to life and equipment. The lack of oxygen makes it tough to get anything done in these high altitudes. But it provides without doubt for epic and vast vistas of one of the greatest landscapes on earth.

MUSIC: “Back to Earth” and “Gamma Ray” – Hector Posser

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Video Interviews: 62-Year Old Journalist Lionel Shriver (Oxford Union)

Lionel Shriver (born Margaret Ann Shriver; May 18, 1957) is an American journalist and author who lives in the United Kingdom. She is best known for her novel We Need to Talk About Kevin, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2005 and was adapted into the 2011 film of the same name, starring Tilda Swinton.

Shriver has written for The Wall Street Journal, the Financial TimesThe New York TimesThe Economist, contributed to the Radio Ulster program Talkback and many other publications. In July 2005, Shriver began writing a column for The Guardian, in which she has shared her opinions on maternal disposition within Western society, the pettiness of British government authorities, and the importance of libraries (she plans to will whatever assets remain at her death to the Belfast Library Board, out of whose libraries she checked many books when she lived in Northern Ireland). She currently writes regularly for The Spectator.

In online articles, she discusses in detail her love of books and plans to leave a legacy to the Belfast Education and Library Board.

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Rock & Roll Biographies: “Conversations With Tom Petty” (February 2020)

Conversations with Tom Petty book February 2020Author Paul Zollo conducted a series of in-depth discussions with Tom about his career, with special focus on his songwriting. The conversations are reprinted here with little or no editorial comment and represent a unique perspective on Tom’s entire career. Originally published in 2005 (also by Omnibus Press), Tom’s wife Dana has fully approved this updated edition, which retains its foreword by Petty, adds additional interview material, an expanded introduction as well as additional photos from Petty’s last ever live performance. This is, perhaps, as close as you can get to an autobiography by the great man.

Tom Petty has long been considered one of the great songwriters of American rock ‘n’ roll, as well as one of the key standard bearers of integrity in the music business. Conversations With Tom Petty is the first authorized book to focus solely on the life and work of the man responsible for some of the most memorable rock anthems of our generation, including: ‘American Girl’, ‘Breakdown’, ‘Refugee’, “The Waiting’, ‘Don’t Come Around Here No More’, ‘I Won’t Back Down’, ‘Free Fallin’, ‘Runnin’ Down a Dream’, ‘You Don’t Know How It Feels’, ‘Mary Jane’s Last Dance’ and many others.

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Video Profiles: 86-Year Old Actress Kim Novak On Her Love Of Artwork (CBS)

Now on the cusp of turning 87, Kim Novak is still finding herself. The star of such classics as Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” “Picnic,” and “Bell, Book and Candle,” the actress turned her back on Hollywood in the 1960s and has since pursued artwork and a love of animals. Mo Rocca reports.

Travel & Nature Videos: “Galbraith Mountain” (Conservation Alliance)

Galbraith Mountain Project

To permanently protect 2,240 privately-owned acres of Galbraith Mountain next to Bellingham, WA, and secure legal rights to extensive, multipurpose, non-motorized recreational activities on that land.

Galbraith Mountain Washington The Conservation Alliance video Uncage the Soul Productions January 2020

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https://uncagethesoul.com/

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Top New Exhibitions: “Tullio Crali – A Futurist Life” (Estorick Collection)

tullio-crali-a-futurist-life-exhibition-catalog.pngLondon – For Tullio Crali (1910-2000) Futurism was not just a school of painting, but an attitude to life itself. Reflecting the movement’s enthusiasm for the modern world, his imagery embraced technology and the machine as important sources of creative inspiration. However, with its particular focus on “the immense visual and sensory drama of flight”, Crali’s work is most closely associated with the genre of ‘aeropainting’, which dominated Futurist research during the 1930s.

Crali discovered Futurism when he was just fifteen years old. An immediate convert, he officially joined the movement in 1929 and quickly developed his own distinctive interpretation of its artistic principles. Despite incorporating recognisable details such as clouds, wings and propellers, Crali’s thrilling

Tullio Crali - Jonathan Monoplane 1988
Tullio Crali – Jonathan Monoplane 1988

imagery challenged conventional notions of realism by means of its dynamic perspectives, simultaneous viewpoints and powerful combination of both figurative and abstract elements.

As a result of his talent, versatility and unshakable commitment to Futurist ideas, Crali swiftly became one of the movement’s key representatives. He continued to be its staunchest advocate during the post-war era, remaining faithful to Futurism’s aesthetic tenets throughout his life.

Featuring rarely seen works from the 1920s to the 1980s, this exhilarating exhibition covers every phase of the artist’s remarkably coherent career, including iconic aeropaintings, experimental works of visual poetry and mixed-media reliefs, as well as examples of ‘cosmic’ imagery dating from the 1960s, inspired by advances in space exploration. Also featured are a large number of Crali’s famous Sassintesi: enigmatic compositions of stone and rock, ‘sculpted’ by natural forces.

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