Category Archives: Art

Top New Artists: Boston-Based Roboticist, Painter And Designer Joe Taveras

Galerie Michael Presents JOE TAVERAS

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Joe Taveras is a Boston-based roboticist, designer, and artist who has spent the majority of his career selling robots around the world. A creative from the outset, his art initially consisted of eclectic musical compositions. It wasn’t until the arrival of the pandemic (March 2020) that he migrated to a new medium: painting. Having had no formal training, he used his time in quarantine to engage in rapid experimentation with an array of styles and mediums in order to truthfully convey his vision. He consistently aims to push the boundaries of innovation with his art, exploring new techniques that reflect his inner and outer environment, questioning our collective future, social norms, and our interminable integration with technology.

His paintings are in private collections in New York, Los Angeles, Miami, the Middle East, Sweden, Spain, Norway, Ghana, Vietnam, China, Canada, and more.

Website

International Art: Apollo Magazine – November 2021

FEATURES | Andrew Russeth on the imperial splendours of the National Palace Museum of Korea; Tacita Dean interviewed by Robert Barry; Susan Moore views one of the world’s finest collections of 17th-century Chinese porcelain; Claudia Tobin on the aesthetic investigations of the writer Vernon Lee in Florence

REVIEWS | Nancy Princenthal on Jasper Johns in Philadelphia and New YorkMichael Prodger on Frans Hals’s male portraits; Douglas Murphy on Sophie Taeuber-Arp at Tate Modern; Nicola Jennings on the Spanish baroque sculptor Luisa Roldán; Charles Nicholl cracks open a book about medieval manuscripts; Andrew James Hamilton on the efforts to find a lost Maya sculpture; Thomas Marks on watching the drama of a restaurant in real time
 
MARKET | A preview of the second part of Asian Art in London, and the latest art market columns from Susan MooreEmma Crichton-Miller and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Bernadine Bröcker Wieder and Douglas McCarthy ask if museums should be dabbling in NFTsRosamund Bartlett on Dostoevsky’s taste in Old Masters; Samuel Reilly visits David Livingstone’s birthplaceWill Wiles defends architectural photographers from their critics; Kirsten Tambling on Louis Wain, the man who drew cats; and Robert O’Byrne on the most expensive project in the history of art-book publishing

Art Views: Claude Monet’s “The Basin At Argenteuil”

Painted along the banks of the Seine, Le bassin d’Argenteuil captures the rise of the middle class and the founding tenants of Impressionism Painted in 1874, Le bassin d’Argenteuil provides a glimpse into the ‘golden’ era of Impressionism. During this time, Claude Monet and his fellow Impressionists, including Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edouard Manet and Alfred Sisley, codified their ideas while painting along the banks of the Seine. Expressing the dynamism of nature and the modernity of the Third Republic, Le bassin d’Argenteuil combines light and leisure to evoke the excitement of a new visual language. The painting, which brings together the artist most synonymous with Impressionism and the town identified with its origins, will be sold at Christie’s on 11 November as part of The Cox Collection: The Story of Impressionism. Learn More: https://www.christies.com/features/cl…

Views: Munch Museum Opens In Oslo, Norway

‘The Scream,’ arguably the most iconic image in art, is the centerpiece of a new museum dedicated to its creator Edvard Munch in Oslo.

Munch Museum is an art museum in Oslo, Norway dedicated to the life and works of the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. As of the summer of 2021, 28000 pieces of art are being moved from the museum at Tøyen, to the museum at Bjørvika, Oslo.

Art: ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ By Abstract Expressionist Helen Frankenthaler

Alex Roediger, MoMA’s senior information coordinator, looks at Helen Frankenthaler’s “Jacob’s Ladder” (1957) with a painter’s eye, and finds that “more paint” isn’t always the key to making a dramatic statement—even in Abstract Expressionism.

Van Gogh Views: ‘Terrace of a Café at Night’ (1888)

Exhibit Tours: ‘Surrealism Beyond Borders’ – The Met

Nearly from its inception, Surrealism has had an international scope, but knowledge of the movement has been formed primarily through a Western European focus. Join Stephanie D’Alessandro, the Leonard A. Lauder Curator of Modern Art and Senior Research Coordinator in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Met, and explore this exhibition, which reconsiders the true “movement” of Surrealism beyond boundaries of geography and chronology—and within networks that span Eastern Europe to the Caribbean, Asia to North Africa, and Australia to Latin America. Including examples from almost eight decades and produced across at least 45 countries, Surrealism Beyond Borders offers a fresh appraisal of some of the collective concerns and exchanges—as well as historical, national, and local distinctions—that will recast appreciation of this most revolutionary and globe-spanning movement. Learn more about the exhibition at https://www.metmuseum.org/surrealism

Curator Tour: ‘Jasper Johns – Mind/Mirror’ At The Whitney Museum

Join Chief Curator Scott Rothkopf as he shares some of his favorite works from Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror, the most comprehensive retrospective ever devoted to Johns’s art. Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The exhibition runs through February 13, 2022.

Views: “L’Estaque Aux Toits Rouges” by Paul Cézanne

L’Estaque aux toits rouges by Paul Cézanne is one of the finest views of L’Estaque, the Provençal fishing village where the artist forged a radical new way of depicting the world around him.

Exhibited in 1936 and hidden away ever since, this remarkable piece will finally come back on view as part of The Cox Collection: The Story of Impressionism, taking place at Christie’s New York on 11 November.

While Cézanne is primarily associated with Aix-en-Provence, the village of L’Estaque near Marseille was a place that he returned to again and again when he sought sanctuary. His relationship with the village began when he holidayed there as a child with his mother. Then, in 1870, when Cézanne left Paris to avoid conscription into the army following the start of the Franco-Prussian War, he escaped to L’Estaque.

Learn More: https://www.christies.com/features/ce…