Category Archives: Art

Art History: ‘Fragonard’s Painted Portraits’ (Video)

Jean-Honoré Fragonard delighted in painting fascinating portraits. In this episode of Sotheby’s Stories, learn how he captured the true essence of character, through his mastery of observation and light.

Jean-Honoré Fragonard was a French painter and printmaker whose late Rococo manner was distinguished by remarkable facility, exuberance, and hedonism. One of the most prolific artists active in the last decades of the Ancien Régime, Fragonard produced more than 550 paintings, of which only five are dated.

ARTS & LITERATURE: “APOLLO MAGAZINE November 2020”

INSIDE THE ISSUE
 
FEATURES | Denzil Forrester interviewed by Gabriel CoxheadKristen Treen on Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ monuments to the American Civil War; Emilie Bickerton visits the Musée Cernuschi in Paris; Glenn Adamson defends progressive deaccessioningThomas Marks visits the Box in Plymouth; mathematician John Coates shows Susan Moore his collection of early Japanese ceramics
 
REVIEWS | Sheila McTighe on Artemisia Gentileschi at the National GallerySamuel Reilly on Michael Armitage at the Haus der Kunst; Mark Polizzotti on Matisse’s artists’ books; Emily Knight on Joseph Wright of Derby; Sameer Rahim on Islamic influences in European architecture; Anthony Cutler on the Turin Shroud
 
MARKET | A preview of the second part of Asian Art in London; and the latest art market columns from Emma Crichton-MillerSusan Moore and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Timon Screech visits the shrines of the shoguns; Gillian Darley on the enduring appeal of crescents in architecture; Damian Thompson watches Yotam Ottolenghi make a feast inspired by the court of Versailles; Thomas Marks on the vital role of education in museumsRobert O’Byrne revisits the advertisements in Apollo 40 years ago
 

Art: Monet’s ‘Islands At Port-Villez, 1897’ (Video)

“I want to paint like a bird sings,” Claude Monet once stated. In this episode of Expert Voices, Simon Shaw describes Monet’s direct and unmediated response to his subject matter. In The Islands in Port-Villez, one can feel just that – Monet sitting on his boat on the seine, absorbing his surroundings.

Artist Profiles: 84-Year Old American Minimalist Frank Stella (Video)

In this episode of Expert Voices, Lisa Dennison discusses a masterful painting created by Frank Stella in the early part of his career. In the 1950s, Stella left Princeton and moved to New York at the height of Abstract Expressionism. Despite being a progenitor of Minimalism, Stella’s gestural hand is visible in the concentric squares – most likely influenced by the Abstract Expressionists.

Frank Philip Stella is an American painter, sculptor and printmaker, noted for his work in the areas of minimalism and post-painterly abstraction. Stella lives and works in New York City. 

Art History Video: ‘De Chirico & Man Ray’s Pre-WWI ‘New Modernity’

In this video, join essayist and New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik in an exploration of two masterpieces from the early twentieth century: Georgio De Chirico’s “Il Pomeriggio di Arianna (Ariadne’s Afternoon)”and Man Ray’s “Black Widow (Nativity).” Both painted near the outset of the first world war, these works not only capture the effusive zeitgeist of their age but prefigure the aesthetic movements that would come to characterize modern art.

Making their auction debut, “Il Pomeriggio di Arianna (Ariadne’s Afternoon)”and “Black Widow (Nativity)”will be offered as highlights of Sotheby’s Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale in New York. (28 October | New York) Learn more: https://www.sothebys.com/en/series/to…

The Impressionists: ‘A Dazzling Still Life From Van Gogh’s Final Days’

“’Auvers is very beautiful, really profoundly beautiful” wrote Vincent van Gogh to his brother Theo, and his stay there in the final days of his life proved to be enormously productive. In his seventy days in Auvers, van Gogh would paint seventy or so canvases, including the masterwork Fleurs dans un verre. Intricately rendered, this vibrant canvas represents one of the few still life paintings executed during this period and will be a highlight of Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale in New York.

Learn More: https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/aucti…

Artwork: Mark Rothko’s ‘Black On Maroon, 1958’ – An “Optical Experience”

In this episode of expert voices, David Galperin examines the painting that entirely shifted the remaining decade of Mark Rothko’s career. In 1958, Rothko’s transforms his color palette into the somber, meditative colors intended to provoke a submersive, awe-inspiring event upon viewing. Learn how in Untitled (Black on Maroon), Rothko embarks on this endeavor for the very first time. Untitled (Black on Maroon) is a highlight of the Contemporary Art Evening auction (28 October 2020, New York).

Top Artist Profile: British Watercolorist Tim Wilmot

Tim Wilmot is an artist from Bristol in the South-west of the UK, specialising in vibrant watercolours, using tone and light to bring out the best in the medium. Tim, self-taught, paints in a loose, impressionistic style and, while having dabbled with portraits and still lifes, he is inexorably drawn to landscapes.

Watercolorist Tim Wilmot

He says: “I’m an outdoor person rather than an indoor person. For many years I’ve taken a sketch book on my travels and I quickly scribble scenes in a shorthand sort of way. Then, returning home, I recreate those memories with paint and brush. Watercolour is also an ideal medium for those quick impressions when you’re limited in time.”

Website

Artists: French Romantic Painter Eugène Delacroix – ‘Greece On The Ruins Of Missolonghi, 1826’ (Video)

Eugène Delacroix, Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi, 1826, oil on canvas, 208 cm × 147 cm (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux). Speakers: Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris.

Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix was a French Romantic artist regarded from the outset of his career as the leader of the French Romantic school. 

Artist Profile Video: Scottish Painter Peter Doig – ‘Boiler House’ (1994)

In 1991, the Scottish artist Peter Doig (b. 1959) visited Le Corbusier’s Unité d’Habitation in northeast France, a utopian housing project that had opened in 1961 in Briey-en-Fôret, then been abandoned.

To Doig, the project was a temple of hope laid to ruin, and the nine large-scale canvases it inspired — Doig’s seminal ‘Concrete Cabins’ series, the largest and most distinctive cycle in Doig’s oeuvre — became a meditation on the decay of Le Corbusier’s modernist vision of social cohesion.

Boiler House was first exhibited in Salzburg after Doig had won the Eliette von Karajan prize in 1994, and was included in Doig’s 2008 retrospective at Tate Britain. It stands alone within the cycle, an isolated building in the forest.

Depicting the building designed to house the estate’s coal boiler, it is rendered in fluid trails of impasto, and carries a stark anthropomorphic charge, the angular geometries looming large through a screen of trees, shifting in and out of focus like a memory or fragments from a movie reel.

Learn More: https://www.christies.com/features/Bo…