Category Archives: Art

International Art: ‘Apollo Magazine – March 2021’

FEATURES | Stephen Patience explores the glamourous world of Noël Coward; Gillian Wearing interviewed by Martin HerbertDaisy Hildyard on the beasts of Francis Bacon; Kirsten Tambling on Queen Mary’s contributions to the Royal Collection; Phillip Prodger considers the merits of colourising early photographs and film

REVIEWS | Linda Wolk-Simon on a new look for the Met’s Old Masters; Mark Pimlott on a survey of post-war museum design in Rotterdam; Morgan Falconer on Soviet ad men at MoMA; Peter Parker on 18th-century paintings of Udaipur; David Ekserdjian on five centuries of Raphael; Tanya Harrod on the letter-cutting of Ralph Beyer; Thomas Marks watches the Uffizi’s new cooking show
 
MARKET | Susan Moore previews March sales in London and New York and looks back at the winter season; Emma Crichton-Miller on collecting Judaica; Jo Lawson-Tancred on Art Dubai and other events not to miss
 
PLUS | Ed Vaizey and Charlotte Higgins on whether the government should be doing more for the arts; Sophie Barling visits the tent-tomb of Richard and Isabel BurtonTimothy Brittain-Catlin on Louis Kahn’s concrete castles; Dora Thornton on the golden age of brooch design; Robert O’Byrne on Georgian waxworks

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Art: ‘After Raphael. 1520 -2020’ – State Hermitage Museum, Russia (Video)

A film about the Exhibition “After Raphael. 1520 – 2020” at the State Hermitage Museum. Director of the film – Manas Sirakanyan. The film was made with the support of the U.S. Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation, U.S. Embassy Moscow and the Hermitage Museum Foundation (USA)

Raphael is the most influential artist of the Modern Era. Over the course of five centuries, exponents of Mannerism and Academicism, Caravaggisti and masters of the Baroque, Romantics and Modernists have invariably compared their own work with Raphael’s legacy. What is the cause of such fame? What did his name represent in this or that historical period, and what does it represent today? What connects the artist’s followers in different centuries? The exhibition in the Hermitage is an attempt to answer those questions and to look at the art of the past 500 years through the lens of Raphael’s influence.

The large-scale display includes more than 300 exhibits – paintings, graphic art, sculpture and applied art from the Hermitage’s own stocks and twelve other collections in Russia and Western Europe. They include both famous masterpieces and previously unknown works. Dozens of paintings and pieces of graphic art are leaving the museum’s storerooms and being presented to the public for the first time, while a whole number of the exhibits are going on show after painstaking restoration in the Hermitage’s workshops.

The display opens with works by the master himself: a painting and drawings from European collections. Without claiming to be a full representation of the artist’s oeuvre, they serve to set the tone, as it were, and after viewers have “tuned themselves in” it will be easier for them to identify echoes of Raphaelesque harmony in the works from later centuries. The choice of graphic art for this purpose reveals another dimension to the main metaphor: it is specifically the beauty of the clear, precise line, so evident in the drawings made by the master’s own hand, that lies at the foundation of the aesthetics of Raphael himself and many of his followers.

Cocktails With A Curator: ‘David’s “Comtesse Daru”

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” savor the exquisite details of “Comtesse Daru,” the only painting in the Frick’s collection by renowned French neoclassical painter Jacques-Louis David. Join Curator Aimee Ng as she delves into the history of how this lovely, intimate portrait came to be painted by an artist largely known for producing monumental works in the service of Napoleon. This week’s complementary cocktail, the Orange Blossom, is inspired by the orange-blossom tiara that adorns the sitter’s head.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/comtessedaru

Art Exhibitions: ‘Hockney & Van Gogh – The Joy Of Nature’ (MFA Houston)

Two visionary artists, separated in time and space, are united by a shared fascination with nature. See the work of David Hockney and Vincent van Gogh side by side in Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature.

This exhibition examines the common ground between British artist Hockney (born 1937) and Dutch artist Van Gogh (1853–1890). Both expressed their profound love of nature through brilliant color and the capacity to see the world with fresh eyes. The Joy of Nature reveals Van Gogh’s unmistakable influence on Hockney in a selection of carefully selected landscape paintings and drawings.

Through a bold use of color and experimentation with perspective, each artist crafts a painterly world that is utterly individual and true to themselves, yet offers immense universal appeal. The Joy of Nature brings together nearly 50 of Hockney’s vibrant works—ranging from intimate sketchbook studies to monumental paintings, as well as his experimental videos and iPad drawings—with 10carefully chosen paintings and drawings by Van Gogh.

Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature premiered at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, and the Houston presentation marks the first time the two renowned artists have been paired in an American museum exhibition. The MFAH is the only U.S. venue.

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Culture & Covid: How Artists & Institutions Are Coping In France (Video)

As cultural institutions struggle to return to a semblance of normality, some spaces are drawing on all sorts of resources to keep fulfilling their role in society. FRANCE 24’s Renaud Lefort took a walk around the French capital, meeting its artists and artisans to see how they’re dealing with these unprecedented circumstances.

Art Exhibition Tours: ‘A New Look At Old Masters’ The MET, New York (Video)

Join curators Keith Christiansen, Stephan Wolohojian, and Adam Eaker on a tour through the newly installed European Paintings galleries and explore new dialogues and themes among the works. A New Look at Old Masters is part of the European Paintings Skylights Project and is a prelude to the final, expansive re-installation of the European Paintings galleries that will take place after the project is completed.

Artists: ‘The Vibrancy Of The Scottish Colourists’

The Scottish Colourists were some of the most important and avant-garde artists working during the early 20th century. Their art was bold and vibrant and unlike anything that had been produced in Britain before. Sotheby’s upcoming sale ‘The Way of Colour: Pictures from the Harrison Collection’ (10 – 17 March) offers Fauvist inspired paintings by George Leslie Hunter, stunning still-lifes by Francis Campbell Boileau Cadell and Cezanne-like work by Samuel John Peploe.

Exhibition Tours: ‘Goya’s Graphic Imagination’

Mark McDonald, Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints, takes us on a virtual tour of Goya’s Graphic Imagination to explore how Goya’s drawings and prints allowed him to share his complex ideas and respond to the turbulent social and political changes occurring in the world around him.

Cocktails With A Curator: Antico’s “Hercules” (Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” we welcome the Frick’s new Assistant Curator of Sculpture, Giulio Dalvit. In his premiere episode, he discusses one of the important bronze statuettes in the collection, a “Hercules” by Antico. A celebrated artist of great technical virtuosity, Antico worked primarily for the powerful Gonzaga family in Mantua in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. In celebration of Isabella d’Este, the marchioness of Mantua and one of Antico’s patrons, thisweek’s complementary drink is a glass of Malvasia, a sweet wine that Isabella would drink at breakfast. To view this object in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/anticohercules

Inside Views: The ‘Louvre Museum’ Masterpieces Undergo Renovation

After months of closure since the beginning of the health crisis and only a reopening for a few short months between two confinements last summer, the #Louvre​ lost 72% of attendance by 2020. But despite the absence of visitors, the heart of the #museum​ has not completely stopped beating. The Louvre is even taking advantage of this period to carry out #renovations​.