Tag Archives: Book Reviews

Books On Boomers: “Stop Mugging Grandma” By Jennie Bristow Seeks To Edify The Boomer Bashers

From a Wall Street Journal book review by Daniel Akst:

Stop Mugging Grandma by Jennie BristowAt the center of the attack on those of us born between 1946 and 1964, days when the U.S. birth rate was extraordinarily high, is our supposed radical individualism. Its roots are said to be found in the excesses of the 1960s, a decade for which “boomers have become fall guys.”

Ms. Bristow, to her everlasting credit, isn’t buying it. “What about the two catastrophic world wars that had dominated the first half of the century; the cynical hedonism of the ‘Roaring Twenties’; the parasitism of colonialism and racial segregation?”

Ms. Bristow, a sociology professor in England, shrewdly situates this new resentment in the context of today’s vogue for collective responsibility and the transmission of guilt across many generations. “Generationalism,” as she calls it, “has come to find its most comfortable home within identity politics, that shrill sentiment of victimisation and grievance that has become an increasingly powerful cultural force.”

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/stop-mugging-grandma-review-defying-the-boomer-bashers-11565651816

Behind The Scenes Books: “Stealing The Show” By John Barelli Showcases The NY Metropolitan Museum Of Art Security

From a Wall Street Journal book review:

Stealing The Show John BarelliWhen Diana, Princess of Wales, attended the Met’s Costume Institute Gala in 1996, a black-tie-clad Mr. Barelli was at her side. “I wasn’t nervous, but the pressure!” he said. “You don’t want anything to go wrong.” The princess had one request: that he keep an eye on the black lace shoulder straps of her midnight blue Dior dress and adjust them if they slipped. “I almost told her: ‘Yeah, right, I have to touch your dress.’ That’s all I have to do. I think my wife would be a little upset,” he recalled. There was no wardrobe malfunction and the evening went off without a hitch, although Mr. Barelli remembers security concerns putting a damper on the fun-loving princess. “We couldn’t let her dance,” he said.

Mr. Barelli, now 70 years old, devoted much of his tenure to less-glamorous work, such as disposing of artifacts from would-be donors. In 2007, a curator in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas received two shrunken human heads in the mail. The cardboard box had no return address, just a note donating the contents, which the sender said had come from friends in Ecuador. “They did have an odor,” said Mr. Barelli, who ultimately consigned the package to the city morgue.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/royalty-a-naked-visitor-and-shrunken-heads-at-the-met-11565521202

Books Worth Reading: “Talking To Strangers” By Malcolm Gladwell Available September 10

From Gladwellbooks.com website:

Talking To Strangers Malcolm Gladwell

Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news. He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Bland—throwing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt. Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don’t know. And because we don’t know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world. In his first book since his #1 bestseller, David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell has written a gripping guidebook for troubled times.

To read more click on link below:

Talking to Strangers

Books For Boomers: “The Plaza” By Julie Satow Is “Social History At Its Best”

“In this definitive history, award-winning New York Times journalist Julie Satow not only pulls back the curtain on Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball and The Beatles’ first stateside visit — she also follows the money trail. THE PLAZA reveals how, during the Great Depression, it was a handful of rich, dowager widows who were the financial lifeline that saved the hotel, and how foreign money and the anonymous shell companies of today have transformed the iconic guest rooms into condominiums shielding ill-gotten gains — hollowing out parts of the hotel as well as the city around it.”

The Plaza Julie Satow

Read more about the book: http://www.juliesatow.com/the-plaza-wip