Audio

World News: Joe Biden, Coronavirus Waves & Putin’s Russia (Economist)

The Economist Editor's PicksA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Joe Biden: Retro or radical? (9:34), the world is not experiencing a second wave of covid-19—it never got over the first (15:25), and a phoney referendum shows that Putin’s legitimacy is fading.

Cities & Society: The Changing Urban Landscape (Podcast)

Monocle WeeklyIn the first of a new series of The Monocle Weekly, Andrew Mueller hosts a panel discussion with leading academics and analysts in urbanism and sociology, taking a deeper look at the changing make-up of our cities and social structures.

Covid-19 Update Podcast: Researchers Simulate New Outbreaks “Military-Style”

coronapod-reportResearchers have run numerous military-style simulations to predict the consequences of fictitious viral outbreaks. We discuss how these simulations work, what recommendations come out of them and if any of these warnings have been heeded.

24:08 One good thing

Our hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the last week, including audience feedback, the official end of the Ebola outbreak in the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and an enormous t-shirt collection.

News: World’s second-deadliest Ebola outbreak ends in Democratic Republic of the Congo

28:50 The latest coronavirus research papers

Benjamin Thompson takes a look through some of the key coronavirus papers of the last few weeks.

Technology & Society: “The Future Of Police Training” (WSJ Podcast)

The Future of Everything WSJ PodcastIn recent weeks, protests have erupted in response to police violence against citizens – specifically communities of color – forcing departments to reconsider how officers do their jobs. Police forces have been using tech – like Tasers and body cameras – to try and reduce the use of lethal force and improve accountability.

In this episode, we’ll explore how emerging technology – like virtual reality training – could improve police training by boosting empathy and tackling racial bias.

News Podcast: “Local Journalism In The U.S.”

Axios TodayFor this Independence Day, we’re dedicating this special episode to journalism and the role it plays in our democracy. Journalism is in danger. It’s under attack and distrusted by many. Tens of thousands of journalists are out of work mostly in local news, where trust is highest.

Guests: Axios’ Sara Fischer, The Oaklandside’s Tasneem Raja, Knight Chair in Journalism and Digital Media Economics Penelope Muse Abernathy

Top New Science Podcasts: Biodiverse Oasis In Mexico, Thermoacoustic Speakers

science-magazine-podcastsFirst up this week, News Intern Rodrigo Pérez-Ortega talks with host Meagan Cantwell about an oasis of biodiversity in the striking blue pools of Cuatro Ciénegas, a basin in northern Mexico. Researchers have published dozens of papers exploring the unique microorganisms that thrive in this area, while at the same time fighting large agricultural industries draining the precious water from the pools. 

David Tatnell, a postgraduate researcher at the University of Exeter, talks with host Sarah Crespi about using heat to make sound, a phenomenon known as thermoacoustics. Just like the sound of fire or thunder, sudden changes in temperature can create sound waves. In his team’s paper in Science Advances, Tatnell and colleagues describe a thermoacoustic speaker that uses thin, heated films to make sound. This approach cuts out the crosstalk seen in mechanical speakers and allows for extreme miniaturization of sound production. In the ultrasound range, arrays of thermoacoustic speakers could improve acoustic levitation and ultrasound imaging. In the hearing range, the speakers could be made extremely small, flexible, and even transparent.

Morning News Podcast: Nursing Homes, Hong Kong Protest & Fake News

Axios TodayElderly people in nursing homes make up 45% of COVID-19 related deaths in the US. Nursing home alternatives have been on the rise for the last decade, but the pandemic has made alternatives more urgent.

  • Plus, the United Kingdom offers to protect the freedoms of Hong Kongers, as China arrested protesters under the new security law.
  • And, a new survey by Pew Research Center shows a portion of Americans believe conspiracy theories and other false information about the coronavirus pandemic.

Guests: Axios’ Kim Hart, Dave Lawler and Mike Allen

Top New Science Podcasts: Tooth Enamel And Decay, Heart Attack Patches, ‘Hot Neptune Deserts’ (Nature)

Nature PodcastsOn this week’s podcast, how the molecular structure of tooth enamel may impact decay, adhesive patches to heal heart attacks, and a mysterious planetary core from a half-formed gas giant.

In this episode:

00:46 Unravelling tooth enamel

Researchers have been looking into the structure and composition of enamel in an effort to better understand tooth decay. Research Article: DeRocher et al.

07:02 Research Highlights

An adhesive patch to help heal heart-attacks, and a new technique to inspect the structure of 2D ‘wonder materials’. Research Highlight: A healing patch holds tight to a beating heartResearch Highlight: A snapshot shows off super-material only two atoms thick

09:21 Unusual planet

In the region close to stars known as the ‘hot Neptune desert’ planets of Neptune’s size are rarely found, but this week scientists have uncovered one and are trying to untangle its mysteries. Research Article: Armstrong et al.

14:52 Briefing Chat

We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we talk about the pitfalls of using CRISPR in human embryos, and renaming of moon craters inadvertently named after Nazi scientists. Nature News: CRISPR gene editing in human embryos wreaks chromosomal mayhemProspect Magazine: Astronomers unknowingly dedicated moon craters to Nazis. Will the next historical reckoning be at cosmic level?