Category Archives: Reviews

Preview: Times Literary Supplement – July 8, 2022

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This week’s @TheTLS , featuring @Godwin_lives on Shelley’s unfinished poems; @devoneylooser on Charles Austen and the slave trade; @jeres on the life of a plongeur; @Mika_R_S on Anna Wintour; @RozKaveney on Samuel R. Delany; @nheller on the Buddha’s tooth – and more.

Covers: Science News Magazine – July 2, 2022

cover of the July 2, 2022 Science News

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

On 29 June, Frieze announced the details of the first edition of its art fair in Seoul, South Korea. So for this last episode of the current season, we’re exploring the art scene and market in the Korean capital.

Ben Luke talks to the art historian and curator Jiyoon Lee about contemporary art in Seoul and beyond, and the origins of the current art scene in 1990s globalisation. The Art Newspaper’s associate editor, Kabir Jhala, speaks to two gallerists—Joorhee Kwon, deputy director at the Kukje Gallery and Emma Son, senior director at Lehmann Maupin, about the growing market and collector base, and the effect Frieze may have on the existing scene.

And this episode’s Work of the Week is Dahye Jeong’s A Time of Sincerity, a basket made with horsehair that this week won the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize. Kabir talks to the creative director at the fashion brand Loewe, Jonathan Anderson, about Jeong’s piece.

Frieze Seoul, COEX, Seoul, 2-5 September.

The Space Between: The Modern in Korean Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 11 September-19 February 2023.

The 2022 Loewe Foundation Craft Prize, Seoul Museum of Craft Art, until 31 July.

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – July 1, 2022

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An ash and gas plume rises from Hunga volcano, Tonga, on 14 January 2022. Global geophysical observations reveal that the climactic eruption that followed on 15 January produced a broad range of atmospheric waves, with pressure wave amplitudes comparable with those from the 1883 Krakatau eruption. While propagating over the world’s oceans, the remarkable atmospheric waves generated complex fast-traveling tsunamis. See pages 3091, and 95.

Photo: Taaniela Kula, Tonga Geological Services

United Kingdom set to abandon EU funding and go it alone
  • Horizon Europe grants held hostage over Brexit dispute

Silence greets requests to flag retracted studies

Authors and editors ignored warnings about citing noted fraudster, exposing a problem in scholarly publishing

Hidden carbon layer sparked ancient bout of global warming

Deep carbon exhumed by volcanic rift between Greenland and Europe implicated in 56-million-year-old hothouse

Cover Preview: Nature Magazine – June 30, 2022

Volume 606 Issue 7916

Order out of chaos

The cover shows an artistic representation of various cancer cells. The large-scale gains, losses and rearrangements of DNA seen in chromosomal instability are a typical feature of cancer — but there is no comprehensive framework to decode the causes of this genomic variability and their possible links to disease. In this week’s issue, Florian Markowetz, Geoff Macintyre and their colleagues present such a framework with a compendium of 17 signatures of chromosomal instability that can be used to predict how tumours might respond to drugs and that help to identify future therapeutic targets. The team created the compendium by examining 7,880 tumours representing 33 types of cancer. In a separate paper, Nischalan Pillay and colleagues examined 9,873 cancers to generate 

Preview: New Scientist Magazine – July 2, 2022

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How readily should we swallow the idea of diets that delay ageing?

The promise of a new diet that can add as much as a decade to your life is certainly tempting – and might well be proven to work – but for now should be swallowed with a pinch of salt

  • FEATURES Ten years after the Higgs discovery, what now for particle physics?
  • NEWS 75 per cent of the world’s top websites allow bad passwords
  • NEWS Largest known bacteria in the world are visible to the naked eye
  • NEWS Was warfare responsible for the origin of complex civilisation?

Science: Enteric Viruses Spread Via Saliva, Jupiter’s Rocks, Megalodon Teeth

Enteric viruses, such as norovirus, cause a significant health burden around the world and are generally considered to only spread via the faecal-oral route.

However, new research in mice suggests that saliva may also be a route of transmission for these viruses, which the authors say could have important public health implications.

Research Article: Ghosh et al.

08:59 Research Highlights

How devouring space rocks helped Jupiter to get so big, and what analysing teeth has revealed about the diet of the extinct super-sized megalodon shark.

Research Highlight: The heavy diet that made Jupiter so big

Research Highlight: What did megalodon the mega-toothed shark eat? Anything it wanted

11:24 Making the tetraneutron

For decades there have been hints of the existence of tetraneutrons, strange systems composed of four neutrons, and now researchers may have created one in the lab. This breakthrough could tell us more about the strong nuclear force that holds matter together.

Research article: Duer et al.

News and Views: Collisions hint that four neutrons form a transient isolated entity

18:46 After Roe v. Wade

Last Friday the US supreme court struck down the constitutional right to abortion. In the wake of this ruling, Nature has been turning to research to ask what we can expect in the coming weeks and months.

News: After Roe v. Wade: US researchers warn of what’s to come

Editorial: 

Preview: Times Literary Supplement – July 1, 2022

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@TheTLS – July 1, 2022. Featuring Kenneth Rogoff on inflation; @KuperSimon on the Tour de France; @natsegnit on the ultrawealthy; Terry Eagleton on Geoff Dyer; @amyhawk_ on Hong Kong; @scheffer_pablo on climate change in medieval literature – and more.

Cover Preview: Scientific American – July 2022

SPACE EXPLORATION

Record-Breaking Voyager Spacecraft Begin to Power Down

The pioneering probes are still running after nearly 45 years in space, but they will soon lose some of their instruments

By Tim Folger

EDUCATION

Subverting Climate Science in the Classroom

Oil and gas representatives influence the standards for courses and textbooks, from kindergarten to 12th grade

By Katie Worth

PSYCHOLOGY

How Parents’ Trauma Leaves Biological Traces in Children

Adverse experiences can change future generations through epigenetic pathways

By Rachel Yehuda

EVOLUTION

Toxic Slime Contributed to Earth’s Worst Mass Extinction–And It’s Making a Comeback

Global warming fueled rampant overgrowth of microbes at the end of the Permian period. Such lethal blooms may be on the rise again

By Chris Mays, Vivi Vajda and Stephen McLoughlin

COSMOLOGY

Astronomers Gear Up to Grapple with the High-Tension Cosmos

A debate over conflicting measurements of key cosmological properties is set to shape the next decade of astronomy and astrophysics

By Anil Ananthaswamy

COMPUTING

‘Momentum Computing’ Pushes Technology’s Thermodynamic Limits

Overheating is a major problem for today’s computers, but those of tomorrow might stay cool by circumventing a canonical boundary on information processing

By Philip Ball