Category Archives: Reviews

October 2022 Preview: EOS Magazine – Tsunami Waves

EOS Magazine October 2022 Issue:

Seismic Sources in the Aleutian Cradle of Tsunamis

Research over the past decade in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands has offered surprising insights into the pulses of great earthquakes that generate dangerous, often long-distance tsunamis.

Is Earth’s Core Rusting?

“Landslide Graveyard” Holds Clues to Long-Term Tsunami Trends

Muography Array Under Tokyo Bay Spots Meteotsunami Waves

Making Waves

International Art: Apollo Magazine – October 2022

Apollo Magazine – October 2022 Issue:

  • Bernice Bing’s West Coast cool

• Antwerp’s greatest museum reopens at last

• Who is UNESCO really for?

• Introducing the Apollo 40 Under 40 Asia Pacific

Plus: the remarkable career of Marianne Werefkin; the making of John Singer Sargent’s notorious Madame X; the occult modernism of Rudolf Steiner; and reviews of the artists who saw in stereo, a history of tomb raiding in Egypt and the memoir of Ibrahim El-Salahi

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Sept 25, 2022

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The New York Times Book Review – 25 September 2022

Historical Novels With a Few Tricks Up Their Sleeves

Special powers, avian obsession and visions of the future fuel these transporting and entertaining tales. By ALIDA BECKER

When Your Star Has Faded but There’s Time Left to Shine

Jonathan Coe’s novel “Mr. Wilder and Me” explores the late career of a legendary Hollywood director. By BENJAMIN MARKOVITS

Previews: Food & Wine Magazine – October 2022

May be an image of 1 person, food and text that says 'FOOD &WINE THE #RESTAURANT ISSUE >> MEET AMERICA'S BEST NEW CHEFS .93 HERE Visit the Restaurant the Year An Insider's Guide to Great Food Cities F&W BEST WON CHEF OCTOBER 2022'

Food & Wine Restaurant of the Year 2022: Locust, Nashville

Locust in Nashville is the most perfect restaurant for our time.

Locust is open three days a week, for five and a half hours a day. Two hours are dedicated to lunch; the remaining time is for dinner service. On average, there are about six dishes on the menu, plus the occasional special (or three). The wine list is just as short. It’s hard to define what exactly the restaurant is, but as of right now, the food mostly has a Japanese bent. And on any given night, there might be a heavy metal soundtrack blasting from the open kitchen, with a few chefs head-banging away as they prepare your next dish. Locust is fully, uncompromisingly, and unapologetically itself—which is exactly what makes it so playful and brilliant.

Books: ‘The Biggest Ideas in the Universe – Space, Time, And Motion’ (2022)

The Biggest Ideas in the Universe

Vol. 1: SPACE, TIME, AND MOTION

The Biggest Ideas in the Universe

Vol. 1: SPACE, TIME, AND MOTION

Book cover for Sean Carroll's "The Biggest Ideas in the Universe"

Dutton Books, 20 September 2022

The goal of The Biggest Ideas in the Universe is to bridge the gap between popular-science treatments of modern physics and true expert knowledge. This is the real stuff — equations and all — presented in a way that presumes no prior knowledge other than high-school algebra. Readers will come up to speed about exactly what professional physicists are talking about, with an emphasis on established knowledge rather than speculation.

Volume One, Space, Time, and Motion, covers the domain of classical physics, from Newton to Einstein. We get introduced to Spherical Cow Philosophy, in which complications are stripped away to reveal the essence of a system, and the Laplacian Paradigm, in which the laws of physics take us from initial conditions into the future by marching through time. We learn the basic ideas of calculus, where we can calculate rates of change and how much of a quantity has accumulated. We think about the nature of space and time, separately and together. Finally we are introduced to the mysteries of non-Riemannian geometry and Einstein’s theory of curved spacetime, culminating into a dive into black holes.

Read more

Covers: New York Times Magazine – Sept 25, 2022

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SIX PHOTOGRAPHERS JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD IN SEARCH OF ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS.

Horses that resemble My Little Ponies (but on Mars). Caimans that eat pythons. Monkeys that live alongside these caimans. High-fiving raccoons. Searching for a snow leopard. Six photographers. Six stories of animal encounters.

THE VOYAGES ISSUE
Gareth McConnell for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueSearching for Wild Animals, Across the WorldFor the magazine’s Voyages Issue, six photographers in pursuit of animal encounters.By The New York Times Magazine
Matthew Pillsbury for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueLessons From a Lifetime of Animal VoyagesThere is an animal-size hole at the center of modern life. Some of us will search the world to fill it.By Sam Anderson
Robin Schwartz for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueInside Seoul’s Wild Animal CafesArctic foxes. Sheep. Raccoons. See them before they’re gone.Photographs by Robin Schwartz
Antoine d’Agata/Magnum, for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueMeeting the Beasts of the Jungle in French GuianaAfter two years without human visitors, the monkeys were restless.Photographs by Antoine d’Agata
Yael Martínez/Magnum, for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueInside an Animal Sanctuary in Bolivia Where Tourists Can HelpPlaces like Senda Verde, a refuge in the tropical Andes, offer an alternative to cruises and safaris.Photographs by Yael Martínez
Gareth McConnell for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueThe Fantastical Beauty of Icelandic HorsesThese stout little creatures look like My Little Ponies on Mars. The photographer Gareth McConnell had to see for himself.Photographs by Gareth McConnell

Read the Voyages Issue here. https://nyti.ms/3C2WvCo

Previews: History Today Magazine – October 2022

Oct 22


A Century of Fascism

Fascism would plague the 20th century, but when Benito Mussolini seized power in October 1922 few could agree on exactly what it was.

Cuban Missile Crisis: the View from Havana

For 13 days in October 1962 the world watched Cuba with bated breath. What was the view like from the epicentre of the missile crisis?

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Sept 24, 2022

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An energy crisis and geopolitics are creating a new-look Gulf

It will be richer, more powerful—and more volatile

Vladimir Putin vows to send more invaders. The West should arm Ukraine faster

It has a window of opportunity to push Russian forces back

Cover Previews: World Archaeology – Sept 2022

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The World Archaeology October 2022 issue explores the secrets of Japan’s stone circles, the lost prehistoric cities of Bolivia, women’s everyday lives in the Ice Age, an idyllic alpine region that saw fierce fighting during the First World War, and much more.

The stone circles of Japan are enigmatic monuments. These structures were created by Jomon hunter-gatherers, mostly from roughly 2500-300 BC, and can be associated with burials, seasonal ceremonies, and solar alignments. Such preoccupations are far from being restricted to Jomon Japan, with study of these circles proving influential when it came to early 20th-century attempts to understand Stonehenge. In our cover feature, we take a detailed look at some of the Jomon stone circles, examining both the monuments themselves, and wider activity in the period.

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Sept 22, 2022

Volume 609 Issue 7928


A gentle lick or nibble makes this brain circuit buzz

Scientists identify a neuronal pathway in rats that drives ‘social grooming’, a behaviour that helps to hold animal communities together.

Warming Arctic brings jet-stream waviness and extreme weather

As high-level winds shift, heat and heavy rain can persist.

A diamond sensor shines at ‘seeing’ voltages

Crystalline device could be used to visualize voltages with high resolution, speed and stability.

A chocoholic’s best friends are the birds and the bats

The trees that provide the raw material for chocolate have a higher yield when the groves are accessible to certain species.

How did the sea cow cross the Pacific? At a ponderous paddle

A family tree of sea cows suggests that the dugong traversed an ocean to reach its present habitat.

Builder drones

Ground-based robots have potential for helping in the construction industry, but they are limited by their height. In this week’s issue, Mirko Kovac, Robert Stuart-Smith and their colleagues introduce highly manoeuvrable aerial robots that can perform additive 3D construction tasks. Inspired by natural builders such as wasps and bees, the researchers created BuilDrones (as shown on the cover) that can work in an autonomous team to perform 3D printing tasks using foam- or cement-based materials. They also created ScanDrones to assess the quality of the structures

 being built. The team hopes that this approach of ‘aerial additive manufacturing’ could help to build structures in difficult to access areas.