Category Archives: Reviews

Previews: The Atlantic Magazine – March 2023

Image

The Atlantic Magazine – March 2023 issue:

We’ve Lost the Plot

Illustration: small abstract human figure stands in between rows of huge glowing smartphone screens
SHIRA INBAR

Our constant need for entertainment has blurred the line between fiction and reality—on television, in American politics, and in our everyday lives.

Sam Bankman-Fried’s Alleged Crimes Have Real Victims

What FTX customers lost may not impoverish them, but they were still cheated.

THE NARCISSISM OF THE ANGRY YOUNG MEN

What to do about the deadly misfits among us? First, recognize the problem.

History: Mahatma Gandhi Assassination At 75 Years

DW News – 75 years ago today, Mahatma Gandhi, who led the campaign for India’s independence, was assassinated in Delhi. The former lawyer is often called the “Father of the Nation” and credited with leading a non-violent struggle for independence from British rule.

Gandhi wanted an independent, peaceful India that protected religious freedom. But that was challenged by growing Muslim and Hindu nationalism. In 1947, India gained independence from the British, but at the cost of Partition – Muslim majority Pakistan and Hindu majority but secular India, came into being. Religous riots followed and Gandhi went on hunger strike to oppose the violence.

On January 30th, 1948, he was assassinated by a Hindu nationalist who believed Gandhi had been too accommodating to Muslims during the Partition. Around a million people turned out for his funeral. That was in 1948. But the India of 2023 is rather different. Hindu nationalism has been emboldened by Prime Minister Narendra Modi – leaving Gandhi’s legacy in tatters, as DW Correspondent Manira Chaudhary finds out.

Previews: The New Yorker Magazine- February 6, 2023

An illustration by Malika Favre. It shows the back of a couple walking on the Brooklyn Bridge.
Art by Malika Favre

The New Yorker – February 6, 2023:

When Law Enforcement Alone Can’t Stop the Violence

Corey Winfield leans through the window of a car, photographed by Rahim Fortune.

Amid a murder crisis in America, community-based solutions have received a flood of funding. How effective are they?

Hildegard of Bingen Composes the Cosmos

How a visionary medieval nun became a towering figure in early musical history.

The Hunt for Russian Collaborators in Ukraine

As occupied territories are liberated, some residents face accusations that they sided with the enemy.

Malika Favre’s “Connected”

The artist discusses seeking inspiration from her surroundings and experiencing new ways of living.

International Art: Apollo Magazine – February 2023

Apollo Magazine – February 2023:

.

  • How Christopher Wren built his reputation
  • The changing face of Silicon Valley
  • An interview with Zineb Sedira
  • The tiger who smoked a pipe
  • Plus: the uncertain market for Old Masters, the Cambridge colleges that have turned to wood, the artists who have taken young women seriously, and reviews of Guido Reni, Edward Hopper and the new museum at the Bibliothèque nationale

Profile: ‘Luminist’ Designs Of Architect Steven Holl

CBS Sunday Morning (January 29, 2023) – The works of architect Steven Holl have helped define the look of cities around the world, making remarkable use of light and space.

Correspondent Rita Braver talks with Holl, whose recent works include the REACH at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in Washington, D.C., and the Kinder Building at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston – buildings in which Holl hopes to express “the joy from the creative act.”

Steven Holl is a tenured Professor of Architecture who has taught at Columbia GSAPP since 1981. After completing architecture studies in Rome in 1970, the University of Washington in 1971, and graduate studies at London’s Architectural Association in 1976, Holl founded Steven Holl Architects in 1977. Based in New York City, the forty person firm also has an office in Beijing.

Steven Holl has realized cultural, civic, academic and residential projects both in the United States and internationally including the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki, Finland (1998); the Chapel of St. Ignatius, Seattle, Washington (1997); Simmons Hall at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts (2002); the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri (2007); the Horizontal Skyscraper in Shenzhen, China (2009); the Linked Hybrid mixed-use complex in Beijing, China (2009); Cité de l’Océan et du Surf in Biarritz, France (2011); the Reid Building at the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland (2014); the Arts Building West and the Visual Arts Building at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa (2006, 2016); the Ex of IN House (2016); the Lewis Arts Complex at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey (2017); Maggie’s Centre Barts in London (2017); the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University (2018); and the Glassell School of Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2018). Upcoming work includes the REACH expansion of the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. (2019); the Winter Visual Arts Center at Franklin & Marshall College (2019); Rubenstein Commons at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (2019); and the expansion of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2020).

Finance Preview: Barron’s Magazine- January 30, 2023

Magazine - Latest Issue - Barron's

Barron’s Magazine – January 30, 2023 issue:

China’s Big Comeback Is Just Getting Started. How to Play It.

The country’s stocks are up 50% since officials rolled back Covid-19 restrictions. Alibaba, Yum China, and other names stand to gain.

23 More Picks From Our Investing Pros

The final installment of this year’s Barron’s Roundtable highlights Deere, Salesforce.com, and other undervalued stocks. Plus, a bevy of bond picks for a rising-rate world.

Lowe’s Is Catching Up to Home Depot. Its Stock Price Will Follow.

The home-improvement retailer is more sheltered from a weakening housing market than you might think. Its stock looks like a buy.

Big Tech Earnings Are Almost Here. Microsoft Has Investors on Edge.

There are still reasons to be bullish on the long-term trend of digital transformation. What to watch in the coming week.

The Bulls Have It in 2023—and Last Year’s Losers Are Winners

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Jan 29, 2023

The New York Times Book Review – January 29, 2023:

Fleeing Slavery in a Top Hat and Cravat

“Master Slave Husband Wife,” by Ilyon Woo, relates the daring escape from bondage in Georgia to freedom in the North by an enslaved couple disguised as a wealthy planter and his property.

Think Screens Stole Our Attention? Medieval Monks Were Distracted Too.

In “The Wandering Mind,” the historian Jamie Kreiner shows that the struggle to focus is not just a digital-age blight but afflicted even those who spent their lives in seclusion and prayer.

‘Age of Vice’: A Lush Thriller Dives Into New Delhi’s Underworld

In Deepti Kapoor’s cinematic novel, a young man from the provinces falls in with a powerful crime syndicate.

Previews: New York Times Magazine- January 29, 2023

Image

The New York Times Magazine – January 29, 2023 issue:

Student. Athlete. Mogul?

Now that college players are allowed to cut sponsorship deals, some of them are raking in the money — but at what cost to the rest?

Your Next Hospital Bed Might Be at Home

In a time of strained capacity, the “hospital at home” movement is figuring out how to create an inpatient level of care anywhere.

Can Germany Be a Great Military Power Again?

Leery of Russian aggression, Europe’s economic giant is making a historic attempt to revitalize its armed forces. It has a long way to go.

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

January 27, 2023: This week: as robotic figures of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama appear in windows of Louis Vuitton stores in New York, London and Tokyo, Ben Luke talks to Federica Carlotto, a specialist in art and luxury, about the latest collaboration between Kusama and the LVMH brand.

What does it tell us about what the former creative director of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, called the “monumental marriage between art and commerce”? Also this week, the artist Michael Rakowitz hopes to give a public sculpture he made for Trafalgar Square in London to Tate Modern and an Iraqi institution. He explains how it prompted Iraq to request the return of one of the lamassu, the ancient Assyrian sculptures that inspired Rakowitz’s work, from the British Museum to its country of origin.

And this episode’s Work of the Week is I didn’t put myself down for sainthood (2018), a piece made by Rosy Martin in collaboration with Verity Welstead. The photographic ensemble is in the opening displays of the new Centre of British Photography in London. We speak to James Hyman, the art dealer, collector and co-founder of the centre, about the work.

You can hear our interview with Michael Rakowitz when he unveiled the sculpture in Trafalgar Square in the episode from 22 March 2018 and an in-depth conversation with Michael in the episode of the A brush with… podcast from 9 June 2021.Headstrong: Women and Empowerment, Centre for British Photography, London, until 23 April.

Research Preview: Science Magazine- January 27, 2023

Science Magazine (January 27, 2023) – The Amazon forest is changing rapidly as a result of human activities, including deforestation for agriculture, such as these soybean fields in Belterra, Pará, Brazil. Remaining areas of forest are experiencing an increased incidence of fires, drought, and the effects of neighboring land uses. These changes threaten local biodiversity and communities and alter the global climate.

Bird flu spread between mink is a ‘warning bell’

Big outbreak at a Spanish farm reignites fears of an H5N1 influenza pandemic

Can California’s floods help recharge depleted aquifers?

Plans to drown orchards and farm fields to boost groundwater supplies get off to a slow start

In Science Journals

Highlights from the Science family of journals