Tag Archives: Russia

News: Five Top Stories For April 19, 2021 (Reuters)

Five stories to know for April 19: Shooting in Louisiana, Shooting in Austin, Texas, Derek Chauvin trial, Alexei Navalny and UEFA statement on the breakaway Super League.

1. Five people were hospitalized after being shot and injured in Shreveport, Louisiana, in the third multiple shooting reported in the United States with 24 hours.

2. After an Austin, Texas shooting, police searched for a former deputy sheriff believed to be the suspected gunman. Three people died.

3. Derek Chauvin trial: jurors will hear closing arguments before they begin deliberating on whether the way former Derek Chauvin knelt on the neck of a dying George Floyd in last year’s arrest was second-degree murder.

4. An ally of jailed Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny said she was braced for bad news on the health of the hunger-striking opposition politician when his lawyers see him again, after they were kept away over the weekend.

5. European soccer’s governing body UEFA will hold a crisis meeting, hours after 12 of the continent’s leading clubs shocked the football world by announcing the formation of a breakaway Super League.

Winter Views: ‘Lake Baikal – Siberia, Russia’ (2K Video)

Winter Baikal – is an amazing place for aerial shooting. Endless ice fields, rough rocks and beautiful sunrises and sunsets make every moment great.

Lake Baikal is an ancient, massive lake in the mountainous Russian region of Siberia, north of the Mongolian border. Considered the deepest lake in the world, it’s circled by a network of hiking paths called the Great Baikal Trail. The village of Listvyanka, on its western shoreline, is a popular starting point for summertime wildlife-spotting tours, plus wintertime ice-skating and dog sledding.

Morning News Podcast: U.S. Housing Market, Russia Sanctions & Luxury Goods

A.M. Edition for April 15. WSJ’s Konrad Putzier discusses global investment in the U.S. housing market. WSJ’s Anna Hirtenstein on the growth of luxury goods. 

The Biden administration is set to punish Russia. Efforts to make band practice safe in the pandemic. Marc Stewart hosts.

Morning News Podcast: Russia’s Military Buildup, U.S. INflation & Flying Taxis

The troops and hardware piling up at the border are probably just posturing. But look closely: Russia’s military is swiftly getting better-equipped and better-trained

Outsized inflation numbers in America are partly a statistical quirk—but also a sign of the tricky balance pandemic-era policymakers must navigate. And why you may soon be getting a lift from a flying taxi

News: Five Top Stories – April 13, 2021 (Video)

Five stories to know for April 13: Protests continue after Minneapolis shooting, Knoxville school shooting, Japan nuclear waste water, Derek Chauvin trial and Russia warns U.S. on Crimea.

1. Minnesota police released body camera footage that shows police officer Kim Potter apparently drawing her gun by mistake, instead of her Taser, when she shot a young Black man, Daunte Wright, to death during a traffic stop. Protests continued overnight in Minneapolis following the incident.

2. A Knoxville school shooting ends with a student shot and killed by police and one officer wounded. Police said the high school student opened fire on them in a campus bathroom, wounding an officer.

3. Prosecutors neared the end of their case in the Derek Chauvin trial. George Floyd’s younger brother Philonise Floyd gave emotional testimony about how his sibling grew up obsessed with basketball and doting on his mother.

4. Japan will release more than 1 million tons of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, the government said, a move China called “extremely irresponsible,” while South Korea summoned Tokyo’s ambassador in Seoul to protest.

5. Russia warned the United States to ensure its warships stayed well away from Crimea “for their own good,” calling their deployment in the Black Sea a provocation designed to test Russian nerves.

Morning News Podcast: Minneapolis Protests, Iran Nuclear Site Explosion

More protests in Minneapolis as details emerge about the killing of yet another black man by a police officer. Iran is promising revenge for an explosion at one of it’s largest nuclear facilities, threatening the future of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal as talks resume.

And, Russia is building up its military presence along the Ukrainian border stoking fears of another invasion.

Artistry: ‘The Lore Of Fabergé Eggs’ (Video)

In the era of the Russian tsars, Peter Carl Fabergé’s jewel-studded objets d’art were a royal riff on a much humbler Easter tradition of ordinary folk giving each other colored hens’ eggs. Correspondent Elizabeth Palmer reports on the lore of Fabergé eggs, from opulent originals to sparkling counterfeits.

The celebrated series of 50 Imperial Easter eggs was created for the Russian Imperial family from 1885 to 1916 when the company was run by Peter Carl Fabergé. These creations are inextricably linked to the glory and tragic fate of the last Romanov family. They were the ultimate achievement of the renowned Russian jewellery house and must also be considered the last great commissions of objets d’art . Ten eggs were produced from 1885 to 1893, during the reign of Emperor Alexander III; 40 more were created during the rule of his dutiful son, Nicholas II, two each year, one for his mother, the dowager, the second for his wife.

360° Aerial Views: Kizhi Island – Russia (Video)

Kizhi is an island near the geometrical center of the Lake Onega in the Republic of Karelia (Medvezhyegorsky District), Russia. It is elongated from north to south and is about 6 km long, 1 km wide and is about 68 km away from the capital of Karelia, Petrozavodsk.

Analysis: ‘A New Space Race – USA Vs China Vs Russia’

In the skies above our heads, humanity’s titanic geopolitical superpowers are yet again duking it out for supremacy among the stars. Only this time, unlike the 1960s, there’s three of them. Or is there? It’s complicated. Join us today as we helmet up and examine the new space race unfolding right now between the US, China and Russia.

What you might call the oldschool or ‘classic’ space race started in the 1950s, peaked during the 60s, and petered out by the mid 70s. It was, to be sure, an unofficial race. Nobody waved a novelty green flag to set things off. But the two largest economic and technological powers of the day – the United States of America and the Soviet Union – fought bitterly to be the first to make meaningful headway into the cosmos.