Tag Archives: New York Times

Top New Travel Books: “52 Places to Go in 2020” (NYT)

Through more than 100 full-color photographs, “52 Places to Go in 2020” takes you to tranquil beaches, ice kingdoms, ground-breaking museums, jungle paradises, picturesque mountains and world-class restaurants.

And for those who like to keep their travels close to home, it contains seven surprising locations in America, including (spoiler alert) Washington, D.C., the No. 1 destination of 2020.

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Take a trip around the world with this must-have book detailing our selection of the top destinations of 2020. Whether you’re a frequent flier, weekend traveler or daring explorer, The Times’s annual “52 Places to Go” list will help you plan vacations, set aspirations and check off bucket lists. For the first time, the 52 locations are presented as a hardcover book packed with photographs, maps and information.

The Times has been publishing “Places to Go” in its Travel section since 2006 to inspire, delight and motivate readers to explore the world. This year’s list provides travel inspiration to cities and countries that are amazing, beautiful, culturally significant and, most important, timely. Each destination has a compelling reason to visit this year.

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Interviews: Director Martin Scorsese On Filmmaking & Death (NYT)

From a New York Times online article (01/02/20):

Martin Scorsese Photo by Philip Montgomery for The New York Times
Scorsese would like to take a year to read and spend time with loved ones. “Because we’re all going. Friends are dying. Family’s going.”Credit…Philip Montgomery for The New York Times

In ways both subtle and substantial, Scorsese sees the world changing and becoming less familiar to him. He gratefully accepted a deal with Netflix, which covered the reported $160 million budget for “The Irishman.” But the bargain meant that, after the movie received a limited theatrical release, it would be shown on the company’s streaming platform.

Scorsese has other aspirations but they have nothing to do with moviemaking. “I would love to just take a year and read,” he said. “Listen to music when it’s needed. Be with some friends. Because we’re all going. Friends are dying. Family’s going.”

Martin Scorsese is the most alive he’s been in his work in a long time, brimming with renewed passion for filmmaking and invigorated by the reception that has greeted his latest gangland magnum opus, “The Irishman.”

And what he wants to talk about is death.

Just to be clear, he’s not talking about the deaths in his movies or anyone else’s. “You just have to let go, especially at this vantage point of age,” he said one Saturday afternoon last month.

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Health And Aging: U.S. Will Need 33,000 Geriatricians By 2025, Only Has 7,000 Now

From a New York Times online article:

Journal of the American Geriatrics SocietyIf one geriatrician can care for 700 patients with complicated medical needs, as a federal model estimates, then the nation will need 33,200 such doctors in 2025. It has about 7,000, only half of them practicing full time. (They’re sometimes confused with gerontologists, who study aging, and may work with older adults, but are not health care providers.)

Geriatrics became a board-certified medical specialty only in 1988. An analysis published in 2018 showed that over 16 years, through academic year 2017-18, the number of graduate fellowship programs that train geriatricians, underwritten by Medicare, increased to 210 from 182. That represents virtually no growth when adjusted for the rising United States population.

“It’s basically stagnation,” said Aldis Petriceks, the study’s lead author, now a medical student at Harvard.

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Top Travel Books: “The New York Times 36 Hours – USA & Canada” (Taschen)

The New York Times 36 Hours USA & Canada Barbara Ireland Taschen Book December 2019In this fully revised and updated third edition of the best-selling USA & Canada volume, TASCHEN presents the best itineraries from across the continent. You’ll find marquee metropolises like New York, Montreal, and Los Angeles; world-famous natural wonders at Niagara Falls and the Grand Canyon; the hidden charm of Rust Belt cities like Duluth and Detroit, as well as 33 new stories including Anchorage, the Berkshires, Boulder, and many more.

Taschen Publishing LogoTo travel in North America is to face a delicious quandary: over these vast spaces with so many riches, from glittering cities to eccentric small towns and heart-stoppingly beautiful mountains and plains, how to experience as much as possible in limited time? The New York Times has the answer, offering up dream weekends with practical itineraries in its popular weekly 36 Hours column for nearly two decades.

  • More than 5,400 hours worth of insightful itineraries to make the most of your stay
  • Practical recommendations for more than 600 restaurants and 450 hotels
  • Comprehensive revisions to all 130 itineraries
  • New destinations including Downtown Miami, Oakland, Chattanooga, and more
  • Color-coded tabs for each region
  • Nearly 1,000 photos
  • 33 new stories
  • Detailed city-by-city maps that pinpoint every stop on your itinerary

The editor

Barbara Ireland edits the 36 HoursExplorer, and forthcoming Cultured Traveler series of travel books in collaboration with The New York Times and TASCHEN. A writer and editor based in upstate New York, she is a former deputy Travel editor and deputy Op-Ed page editor at The New York Times. She is a graduate of Cornell University and was a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford University.

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New Years Resolutions: “Stop Making Excuses Not To Exercise!!” (NY Times)

From a New York Times online article:

The New York Time logoAt the moment, about two-thirds of Americans do not meet the standard exercise guidelines of about 30 minutes a day of moderate exercise, such as walking.

These findings might suggest that, if we adjusted our schedules and turned off the TV, phone or computer, most of us would have plenty of time to work out.

Screen Time vs Physical Activity vs Free Time Chart CDC

Almost all of the respondents — whatever their income, age, gender or ethnicity — reported about five hours a day of leisure time. Men tended to have more free time than women, older people more than the young, and African-American women the least of all. But no group reported less than about four and a half hours a day of free time.

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Dementia: Cognitive Loss Is Greatest At “Slightest Level Of Hearing Loss”

From a New York Times online article:

Hearing Loss…the researchers demonstrated that the biggest drop in cognitive ability occurs at the slightest level of hearing loss — a decline from zero to the “normal” level of 25 decibels, with smaller cognitive losses occurring when hearing deficits rise from 25 to 50 decibels.

Hearing loss is now known to be the largest modifiable risk factor for developing dementia, exceeding that of smoking, high blood pressure, lack of exercise and social isolation, according to an international analysis published in The Lancet in 2017.

the new findings on cognitive losses linked to subclinical hearing loss, gleaned from among 6,451 people age 50 or older, suggest that any degree of hearing loss can take a toll.

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New American Cars: “2020 Corvette C8”, Mid-Engine With Retractable Hardtop

From a New York Times online article:

The 2020 Corvette Stingray has moved its engine behind the driver and passenger, adopting the physics-approved layout that brought Ferdinand Porsche his first racing successes in the 1930s. Today, this approach is associated with money-torching supercars from Ferrari, Lamborghini and McLaren.

The long-awaited “mid-engine” Corvette easily outruns its formidable predecessor, as I learned during a time-warping desert drive near Tortilla Flat, Ariz. The eighth-generation “C8” Corvette is earning rapturous reviews and dominating industry awards, as a car that can take on European exotics that cost $200,000 and more, but at a $59,995 base price that reads like a misprint.

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