Tag Archives: Photography

Video Profiles: Italian Photographer Massimo Vitali At Home In Lucca

Directed by: Barbara Anastacio

Even though the image-maker’s large color works are held in galleries around the world, Vitali chooses not to display any photography in his home. Instead, the crumbling walls, sky blue vaulted ceilings, eroded slogans, frescoes and marble archways of the church provide as much narrative as any image.

My Place - Massimo Vitali Short Film 2019

Massimo Vitali - Natural HabitatsAn assortment of inflatable alligators, damp bodies and candy cane-colored umbrellas typify Italian photographer Massimo Vitali’s ongoing Beach Series, which he began in 1995. Born in Como, Italy in 1944 Vitali’s internationally recognized panoramas of busy ski resorts, clubs, pools and piazzas explore the multilayered stories present in communal leisure places.

“Vitali’s choice of home reflects his intrigue in the spaces that people chose to congregate in”

This Barbara Anastacio-directed episode takes us away from the crowds and into the tranquil Tuscan city of Lucca where Vitali lives with his wife and son. The photographer’s home is a fourteenth-century church, which—in one of it’s most recent incarnations—was used a boxing and fencing gym for young fascists during the Mussolini years.

My Place - Massimo Vitali Short Film 2019

To read more: https://www.nowness.com/series/my-place/massimo-vitali-barbara-anastacio

New Photography Books: “The World’s Edge” By Thomas Joshua Cooper

From Barnes and Noble:

Thomas Joshua Cooper von Michael Govan
Thomas Joshua Cooper

Working solely with an 1898 Agfa field camera, Thomas Joshua Cooper has established himself as one of the foremost photographers of our time. His magnificent black-and-white seascapes explore specific points on the globe–often at the most remote areas, where sea and land meet. Fans of Cooper’s Atlas project, in which he has charted the Atlantic Basin, will be thrilled to find a generous selection of those images here–abstractions ranging from pitch black to clear white, and subtle gradations in between. Exquisitely reproduced, these photographs reveal the coastlines of the five continents that encircle the Atlantic Ocean. This volume also features images that deal with themes such as the earth’s changing environment, historical narratives, and North America’s great rivers and their sources. Enhancing this book are an essay by Michael Govan; biographies of the artist by Rebecca Morse and Anne Lyden, International Photography Curator at the National Galleries of Scotland; and a chronicle of the Atlas project by Christie Davis of the Lannan Foundation. Poems by Robinson Jeffers and Theodore Roethke round out this retrospective book of one of the most celebrated and distinctive photographers working today.

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thomas-joshua-cooper-michael-govan/1130039159?ean=9783791358260&st=PLA&sid=BNB_ADL+Core+Generic+Books+-+Desktop+Medium&sourceId=PLAGoNA&dpid=tdtve346c&2sid=Google_c&gclid=CjwKCAjwxOvsBRAjEiwAuY7L8m_OUQpkhNHK1CkT3i3Gx2nyNw_u4Vqd0ngHXy6v2b0MOdjYRGVCbxoC2JoQAvD_BwE

Documentary Photography: Robert Frank Chronicled Post World War II America

From a New York Times online article:

Mr. and Mrs. Feiertag, Late Afternoon, 1951.CreditRobert Frank; National Gallery of Art, WashingtonRigorously unsentimental in his attitude to the world around him, Mr. Frank deviated from form in 1950, taking what was arguably his most romantic picture. He had his reasons. He was in love. The year before he had met artist Mary Lockspeiser, who became his first wife. In “Tulip/Paris,” he photographed a young man who is holding behind his back a tulip — presumably intended for the woman standing in the background. An old man, at the other end of life’s arc, approaches the viewer. It is a classic romantic Paris street photograph.

Robert Frank kicked documentary photography into the present with a loud clang. In place of the detached formalism of Walker Evans and the poetic lyricism of Henri Cartier-Bresson and Andre Kertesz, he brought a moody, cool intensity that stamped his pictures with a readily identifiable hallmark. Using a 35-millimeter Leica, he could compose images as elegantly framed as if he’d set up a tripod, or as blurry and off-center as an amateur snapshot. He took whatever means he needed to express a vision that was alternately empathetic and obstreperous, as contradictory as the man himself.

To read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/11/arts/design/robert-frank-photographs.html?module=inline

Collectible Books: “Gold” By Sebastião Salgado Chronicles The Brazilian Gold Rush (Taschen)

From a Taschen.com online release:

Gold Sebastiao Salgado gold workers“Salgado’s photographs project an immediacy that makes them vividly contemporary. We know that the mine at Serra Pelada is now closed, yet the intense drama of the gold rush leaps out of these images.”

For a decade, Serra Pelada evoked the long-promised El Dorado as the world’s largest open-air gold mine, employing86-11-46-32.tif some 50,000 diggers in appalling conditions. Today, Brazil’s gold rush is merely the stuff of legend, kept alive by a few happy memories, many pained regrets—and Sebastião Salgado’s photographs. This signed edition gathers the complete black-and-white portfolio in impeccable, grand-scale, museum-quality reproductions.

To read more: https://www.taschen.com/pages/en/catalogue/photography/all/86908/facts.sebastio_salgado_gold.htm

New Photography Books: The Full-Day Panoramas Of “Day To Night” By Stephen Wilkes (Taschen)

From a Smithsonian Magazine online review:

Flatiron NYC Day to Night 2010 Stephen WilkesAt first glance, Stephen Wilkes’ photographs look like a single moment in time. It is only upon closer inspection that viewers discover that each of his works is actually the result of shooting thousands of photographs from a stationary position over the course of a day and stitching them together digitally to create one cohesive panorama. The painstaking task of editing all of this information and whittling it down into one image can take months to complete, but the results capture a sense of place that can’t be expressed by a single frame alone.

Wilkes expands on this concept in his new bookDay to Night, which features panoramas of iconic places like New York’s Coney Island, Moscow’s Red Square and Arizona’s Grand Canyon seen over the course of a day. Time-lapse photos these are not, as Wilkes carefully selects the exact frames he’ll compile into the final image. (The book release coincides with “A Witness to Change,” a photographic exhibition to be held at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York City beginning September 12.)

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/how-photographer-stephen-wilkes-captures-full-day-single-image-180972935/#6RZ7EF0BklRrTGAP.99

Visual Artists: Samir Belhamra’s “Mesmerizing Meadows From Soaring Perspectives” In Provence

From a MyModernMet.com online article:

Samir Belhamra Visual Artist - Valensole by Night, South France, Provence 2To many nature photographers, no muse is quite as magical as a field of flowers. This tried and true subject is particularly popular with aerial photographers, whose atmospheric shots allow us to explore the mesmerizing meadows from soaring perspectives. One photographer taking this trend to new heights is Samir Belhamra, a visual artist whose love of aerial photography landed him in a lavender field in France.

Situated in Valensole, a picturesque town in Provence, this field of flowers blankets the golden landscape in shades of purple. In order to capture the extent of the site’s sprawling beauty, Belhamra begins his video at ground level. Slowly, he directs his DJI Mavic Air drone toward the sky in order to showcase the perfectly organized and seemingly endless rows of flowers from various vantage points.

https://grafixartphoto.com/

To read more click on following link: https://mymodernmet.com/lavender-video-samir-belhamra/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=2019-08-29

Top Photographers: Christian Vizl Shot The World’s Oceans In Black & White For Three Decades

From a MyModernMet.com online article and interview:

Silent Kingdom A World Beneath The Waves Christian VizlI have always loved the ocean and also photography. I started taking pictures as a teenager and was very inspired by black and white masters like Ansel Adams and Henri Cartier-Bresson, but didn’t combine these two passions until 2010 after a dive I did with an underwater videographer friend. During this trip, we made an immersion when he suddenly gave me his camera and left. After a while, I turned it on and loved the feeling of having a camera underwater. That’s when I decided to buy my first underwater camera…

Award-winning underwater photographer Christian Vizl has been inspired by the ocean since childhood. Born in Mexico City, his career spans more than thirty years and in that time he’s earned an international reputation for his artistic documentation of life underwater. In particular, he’s recognized for his powerful black and white underwater photographs, which harness light and shadow to reveal different aspects of marine life.

https://www.christianvizl.com/index

In his new book Silent Kingdom, published by Earth Aware Editions, Vizl shares his vision of the underwater world. Schools of fish, sea lions, jellyfish, and manatees all get equal treatment in the book. Vizl manages to capture the elegance of life below sea level by using his keen eye for symmetry and composition.

To read more click on the following link: https://mymodernmet.com/christian-vizl-silent-kingdom-underwater-photography/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=2019-08-29