Tag Archives: Culture

Trends In Healthy Living: Copenhagen, Denmark Is The “Global Exemplar Of Bicycle Culture”

From a New York Times online article:

Copenhagen Cyclists Betina Garcia for The New York TimesCopenhagen’s legendary bicycle setup has been propelled by all of these aspirations, but the critical element is the simplest: People here eagerly use their bicycles — in any weather, carrying the young, the infirm, the elderly and the dead — because it is typically the easiest way to get around.

Copenhagen’s status as a global exemplar of bicycle culture owes to the accommodating flatness of the terrain and the lack of a Danish auto industry, which might have hijacked the policy levers. Trouble also played a role.

Nearly half of all journeys to school and work in Copenhagen take place on bicycles. And people like it that way.

The global oil shock of the 1970s lifted the price of gasoline, making driving exorbitantly costly. A dismal economy in the 1980s brought the city to the brink of bankruptcy, depriving it of finance to build roads, and making bicycle lanes an appealingly thrifty alternative.

To read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/09/world/europe/biking-copenhagen.html

Science & Culture: Human’s Early Ancestors, Digital Transformation (Economist Podcasts)

The Economist BabbageScientists believe they have located the ancestral home of one of humanity’s early ancestors—in northern Botswana. Tom Siebel, a Silicon Valley veteran and the founder of C3.ai, explains how digital transformation stops companies from going extinct. And, host Kenneth Cukier takes a trip to the Natural History Museum in London to learn about bias in species collection

Nostalgia: “Abbey Road” – 50 Years Since The Beatles Walked Off Stage (1969)

From a New Yorker Magazine online article:

Beatles Abbey Road Quote from Paul McCartney“Abbey Road” was the Beatles’ last word—the final recordings by the most popular and influential artists of the nineteen-sixties. Now, on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, “Abbey Road” has been expertly remixed by Giles Martin, George Martin’s son and protégé, and reissued in a super-deluxe edition that comes with an archive of studio outtakes and a hundred-page book of essays and liner notes that chronicle how the recordings were made. “The Beatles are good even though everybody already knows that they’re good,” the classical composer Ned Rorem observed in 1968, alluding to how the band’s immense popularity confounded the usual notions of discriminating taste. If anyone needs to be reminded of this, this new edition of “Abbey Road” should do the trick.

In the spring of 1969, Paul McCartney telephoned George Martin to ask if he would be willing to work with the Beatles on a new album they planned to record in the months ahead. Martin, who was widely regarded as the most accomplished pop-record producer in the world, had overseen the making of all nine albums and nineteen singles that the Beatles had released in Britain since their début on E.M.I.’s Parlophone label, in 1962. His reputation was synonymous with that of the group, and the fact that McCartney felt a need to ask him about his availability dramatized how much the Beatles’ professional circumstances had changed since the release of the two-record set known as the White Album, in the fall of 1968. In Martin’s view, the five months of tension and drama it took to make that album, followed by the fiasco of “Get Back,” an ill-fated film, concert, and recording project that ended inconclusively in January, 1969, had turned his recent work with the Beatles into a “miserable experience.”

To read more: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/when-the-beatles-walked-offstage-fifty-years-of-abbey-road?utm_campaign

New Culture Books: “The Sartorialist INDIA” By Scott Schuman (2019)

From an Architectural Digest online interview:

the_sartorialist_india_fo_int_3d_05353_1908190959_id_1260398I wanted this book to be a bit different. It’s not an encyclopaedia of India, but I really tried to go to a lot of different places and photograph whatever I saw that I thought seemed really visually intriguing. I went to music festivals, sporting events, wrestling…and there’s cricket and horse racing in this book too.  There’s fashion week, and then small villages in Odisha. As a photographer, if you’re picky like I am, I didn’t want to just include say, a horse racing photograph, but I wanted to put myself in that position, and if I came up with something good, that would be great. I just wanted to try and put myself in a lot of different positions to see different elements of India.

Scott Schuman has been travelling to India for the better part of a decade. For his acclaimed fashion blog, The Sartorialist, Scott has photographed the eye-catching, sometimes strange, effortless whimsy of street fashion all around the world, and India has made a significant appearance too. Now, Scott is releasing a book of photographs specifically dedicated to the country—The Sartorialist: India, published by Taschen. Scott speaks to AD India about his travels to the country, his quest for the cool kids, and what still surprises him about Indian fashion.

To read more: https://www.architecturaldigest.in/content/the-sartorialist-in-conversation/#s-cust0

Cultural Destinations: The Huntington Library Launchess Centennial Celebration September 5

From The Huntington Library news release:

The Huntington Library and Gardens 100th CentennialThe Huntington’s Centennial Celebration kicks off on Sept. 5, 2019, with a special event for press and Southern California civic, higher education, and cultural leaders—a number of whose institutions are also celebrating significant anniversaries. Huntington President Karen R. Lawrence will host the celebration, sharing key news announcements and highlighting plans for the centennial year and beyond. The formal program will include a panel discussion with thought leaders on some of the big ideas shaping the future, brief presentations by Huntington leadership from each collection area, and a special musical performance interpreting sheet music from the Harold Bruce Forsythe collection. Public visitors will enjoy music in the gardens by Todd Simon and members of his Angel City All-Star Brass Band from noon to 2 p.m.

The Sept. 5 event will set the stage for a yearlong series of exhibitions, public programs, new initiatives, and more—inviting people with a range of interests to engage with the venerable institution’s collections and the connections they offer while exploring the interdisciplinary ideas that will shape the next 100 years. The Centennial Launch’s program reflects the interdisciplinary lens of The Huntington’s incomparable collections.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.huntington.org/news/centennial-celebration-sept-5

Cultural Events: Smithsonian Magazine Celebrates “Museum Day” With Free Entry To Over 1600 Museums On Sept. 21

From SmithsonianMag.com:

Free Museum Day Sept 21 2019More than 1,600 museums nationwide will be opening their doors for free on Sept. 21 in honor of Museum Day.

It’s an annual event organized by Smithsonian Magazine to celebrate cultural institutions and museum-goers across the country from Los Angeles to New York and from Hawaii to Alaska. It encourages museums, galleries and historic sites to allow free entry just as the Smithsonian Institution’s Washington, D.C.-based facilities do year-round.

Even some animal centers like the Charles Paddock Zoo (usually $10 for adults) in California and the Swaner Preserve and Ecocenter in Utah (also $10) have chosen to take part.

To find a participating museum click on the following link: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/search/?q=Frist%20Art%20Museum%20&

WHO SHAPED THE 1960’S?: CULTURAL CHANGE SWEPT UP THE BOOMERS, IT JUST DIDN’T BEGIN WITH THEM

From a New Yorker article by Louis Menand:

Woodstock GenerationAlthough the boomers may not have contributed much to the social and cultural changes of the nineteen-sixties, many certainly consumed them, embraced them, and identified with them. Still, the peak year of the boom was 1957, when 4.3 million people were born, and those folks did not go to Woodstock. They were twelve years old. Neither did the rest of the 33.5 million people born between 1957 and 1964. They didn’t start even going to high school until 1971. When the youngest boomer graduated from high school, Ronald Reagan was President and the Vietnam War had been over for seven years.

The boomers get tied to the sixties because they are assumed to have created a culture of liberal permissiveness, and because they were utopians—political idealists, social activists, counterculturalists. In fact, it is almost impossible to name a single person born after 1945 who played any kind of role in the civil-rights movement, Students for a Democratic Society, the New Left, the antiwar movement, or the Black Panthers during the nineteen-sixties. Those movements were all started by older, usually much older, people.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-misconception-about-baby-boomers-and-the-sixties