Tag Archives: Art

Views: Munch Museum Opens In Oslo, Norway

‘The Scream,’ arguably the most iconic image in art, is the centerpiece of a new museum dedicated to its creator Edvard Munch in Oslo.

Munch Museum is an art museum in Oslo, Norway dedicated to the life and works of the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. As of the summer of 2021, 28000 pieces of art are being moved from the museum at Tøyen, to the museum at Bjørvika, Oslo.

Art: ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ By Abstract Expressionist Helen Frankenthaler

Alex Roediger, MoMA’s senior information coordinator, looks at Helen Frankenthaler’s “Jacob’s Ladder” (1957) with a painter’s eye, and finds that “more paint” isn’t always the key to making a dramatic statement—even in Abstract Expressionism.

Van Gogh Views: ‘Terrace of a Café at Night’ (1888)

Curator Tour: ‘Jasper Johns – Mind/Mirror’ At The Whitney Museum

Join Chief Curator Scott Rothkopf as he shares some of his favorite works from Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror, the most comprehensive retrospective ever devoted to Johns’s art. Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The exhibition runs through February 13, 2022.

Views: “L’Estaque Aux Toits Rouges” by Paul Cézanne

L’Estaque aux toits rouges by Paul Cézanne is one of the finest views of L’Estaque, the Provençal fishing village where the artist forged a radical new way of depicting the world around him.

Exhibited in 1936 and hidden away ever since, this remarkable piece will finally come back on view as part of The Cox Collection: The Story of Impressionism, taking place at Christie’s New York on 11 November.

While Cézanne is primarily associated with Aix-en-Provence, the village of L’Estaque near Marseille was a place that he returned to again and again when he sought sanctuary. His relationship with the village began when he holidayed there as a child with his mother. Then, in 1870, when Cézanne left Paris to avoid conscription into the army following the start of the Franco-Prussian War, he escaped to L’Estaque.

Learn More: https://www.christies.com/features/ce…

Art: Jacqueline Roque – Picasso’s Ultimate Muse

Picasso’s stunning painting ‘Femme Accroupie’, offered in Sotheby’s upcoming Modern Art Evening Sale (9 October | Hong Kong), is a portrait of his ultimate muse and wife, Jacqueline Roque. In this latest Expert Voices, Sotheby’s Chairman Brooke Lampley tells us of the huge artistic inspiration Jacqueline had on Picasso. Discover how this work was the final summation of an entire series of portraits of her, and how it was inspired by master artists of previous centuries.

Exhibitions: ‘Surrealism Beyond Borders’ – The Metropolitan Museum

Watch a video preview of the exhibition, “Surrealism Beyond Borders,” on view at The Met from October 11, 2021–January 30, 2022. Nearly from its inception, Surrealism has had an international scope, but knowledge of the movement has been formed primarily through a Western European focus. This exhibition reconsiders the true “movement” of Surrealism across boundaries of geography and chronology—and within networks that span Eastern Europe to the Caribbean, Asia to North Africa, and Australia to Latin America. Including almost eight decades of work produced by artists from over 45 countries, “Surrealism Beyond Borders” offers a fresh appraisal of these collective concerns and exchanges—as well as historical, national, and local distinctions—that recasts appreciation of this most revolutionary and globe-spanning movement. Learn more about the exhibition: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions…

Art Exhibit: ‘Chaïm Soutine / Willem de Kooning’ At The Musée de l’Orangerie

The Musée de l’Orangerie presents an exhibition bringing together the works of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943), painter of the Paris School of Russian origin (now Belarus) and Willem de Kooning (1904-1997), abstract expressionist American of Dutch origin. 

This exhibition will focus more specifically on exploring the impact of Soutine’s painting on the pictorial vision of the great American painter.

Soutine indeed marked the generation of post-war painters by the expressive force of his painting and his figure of “accursed artist”, grappling with the vicissitudes and excesses of Parisian bohemia. His work was particularly visible in the United States between the 1930s and 1950s, when the figurative artist of European tradition was re-read in the light of new artistic theories. The gestural painting and the pronounced impasto of Soutine’s canvases lead critics and curators to proclaim him a “prophet”, herald of American abstract expressionism.

It was precisely at the turn of the 1950s that Willem de Kooning began the pictorial work of Women, canvases in which a singular expressionism was built, between figuration and abstraction. The development of this new language corresponds to the moment when the painter summons the artistic universe of Chaïm Soutine and confronts it. De Kooning discovered his predecessor’s paintings in the 1930s, then at the retrospective which devoted the painter to the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1950. He was then particularly marked by the presentation of Soutine’s paintings in the Foundation’s collections. Barnes of Philadelphia, where he visited with his wife Elaine in June 1952.

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Cover Previews: Apollo Magazine – September 2021

FEATURES | Jonathan Griffin on mysticism and modern art; Yasmine Seale watches Sheila Hicks at work; Andrew Lloyd Webber gives Sophie Barling a tour of Drury Lane; Eve M. Kahn at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C.; Valeria Costa-Kostritsky on the Museum of Homelessness

REVIEWS | Susan Owens on Gustave Moreau’s fables at Waddesdon; Aimee Ng on the Medici at the Met; Emilie Bickerton on Georges Méliès at the Cinémathèque Française; Peter Parker on Richard Chopping in SalisburyTom Stammers on history in the age of Romanticism; Kitty Hauser on the life of Francis Bacon; David Ekserdjian on Italian paintings at the Norton Simon; Sameer Rahim on the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus; Rebecca Ann Hughes on the tricks of the white-truffle trade
 
MARKET | Jo Lawson-Tancred selects her highlights of TEFAF Online; and the latest art market columns from Susan MooreEmma Crichton-Miller and Samuel Reilly
 
PLUS | Susan Moore and Niru Ratnam ask if the art world has a sense of humourDiane Smyth on the rise of falling in photography; Martin Herbert at the restored Neue Nationalgalerie in BerlinWilliam Dunbar on a cave monastery in Georgia; Gillian Darley on the visions of Joseph Gandy; Robert O’Byrne on the forgotten art of Ignazio Hugford