Tag Archives: Art

International Art: Apollo Magazine – February 2023

Apollo Magazine – February 2023:

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  • How Christopher Wren built his reputation
  • The changing face of Silicon Valley
  • An interview with Zineb Sedira
  • The tiger who smoked a pipe
  • Plus: the uncertain market for Old Masters, the Cambridge colleges that have turned to wood, the artists who have taken young women seriously, and reviews of Guido Reni, Edward Hopper and the new museum at the Bibliothèque nationale

Native American Art: Tour Of ‘Raven And The Box Of Daylight’ Exhibition (2023)

CBS Sunday Morning – Preston Singletary, a member of the Tlingit tribe of Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, uses a very untraditional medium when fashioning indigenous art: glass.

He talks with correspondent Lilia Luciano about his traveling exhibition, “Raven and the Box of Daylight” (now at the Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.), which tells a Native American folktale about the origins of the world entirely through glass.

Preston Singletary: Raven and the Box of Daylight

The story Raven and the Box of Daylight, which tells how Raven transformed the world and brought light to the people by releasing the stars, moon, and sun, holds great significance to the Tlingit people of the North Pacific Coast. A new body of work by artist Preston Singletary immerses readers in Tlingit traditions by telling this story through his monumental glass works and installations. Primarily known for his celebration of Tlingit art and design, Singletary explores new ways of working with glass inspired by Tlingit design principles. This book includes texts that place Singletary’s work within the histories of both glass art and Native arts traditions—especially the art of spoken-word storytelling. Also included are a biography and an interview with the artist. Co-authored by Miranda Belarde-Lewis and John Drury.

Top 2023 Art Exhibitions: Sholto Blissett – Rubicon

Sholto Blissett Rubicon I, 2022 oil on canvas 78 3/4 x 118 1/8 in. (200 x 300 cm.)
SHOLTO BLISSETT: RUBICON
January 25-February 22, 2023

Bodies of water act as both borders and conjunctions, where societies are delineated and defined. Further contradictory meanings bubble through to the surface as Blissett’s imagined landscapes become psychological spaces for meditation where the river is an obstacle to be crossed and considered.

Installation view of Sholto Blissett: Rubicon (January 25-February 22, 2023) at Alexander Berggruen, NY. Photo: Dario Lasagni

In Rubicon, Blissett’s upland rivers are framed by bridges that run perpendicular to the body of water. The artist’s central placement of the bridges, Roman architectural embellishments in linear perspective, and urge to repetitively revisit similar yet increasingly foreboding environments reveals an attempt to organize or frame the scene. Yet, this organization is a fiction as from this positioning, the bridges cannot encompass the swell, the rugged topography, and the cloud-blemished skies. While bridges connect lands and cultures, from this frontal viewpoint, the ends of the arches depicted in Blissett’s paintings are rendered inaccessible

Arts: Native American Art Magazine – Feb/Mar 2023

Native American Art Magazine - Issue #43

Native American Art Magazine – February/March 2023:

Native American Art Magazine - Issue #43Moments in Time – Speaking with Light photography exhibition opens at the Denver Art Museum.

Native American Art Magazine - Issue #43Enduring Legacies – The Tucson Museum of Art exhibits works from the James T. Bialac Collection in Southern Arizona.

Native American Art Magazine - Issue #43Dazzling Array – The Richard A. Gates Collection of jewelry goes on display at Western Spirit in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

January 20, 2023: Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in Tokyo are the subject of a legal claim in the US relating to Nazi loot.

The Art Newspaper’s London correspondent and resident Van Gogh expert Martin Bailey tells us why Sunflowers (1888-89) is at the centre of the dispute, 35 years after it was sold for a record price at auction, and why the heirs of the German Jewish banker Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, who owned it until the 1930s, now value it at a staggering $250m.

Our editor-at-large Georgina Adam has just returned from Singapore, where the first Art SG art fair took place last week. How successful was this new event in the art market calendar, and what does it tell us about Singapore’s ambitions to become an art hub?

And this episode’s Work of the Week is Portraits in a Chinese Studio, a photographic work by the artist Grace Lau. In the project, which marks Chinese New Year, Lau is subverting the tradition of colonial 19th-century portrait studios in a shopping centre in Southampton on the south coast of the UK.Grace Lau: Portraits in a Chinese Studio, Marlands Shopping Centre, Southampton, UK, 21 January-12 February

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

January 13, 2023: In the first episode of the year, we look ahead at the next 12 months. Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor at The Art Newspaper, peers into her crystal ball and tries to predict the fortunes of the art market this year.

Then, Jane Morris, one of our editors-at-large, José da Silva, our exhibitions editor, and host Ben Luke select the museum projects, biennales and exhibitions that they are most looking forward to in 2023.Events discussed:

  • The Grand Egyptian Museum: no confirmed opening date.
  • \The National Portrait Gallery reopens on 22 June.
  • Factory International, Manchester, also opens in June.
  • Yayoi Kusama’s You Me and the Balloons opens there on 29 June, as does the Manchester International Festival.
  • The Sharjah Biennial: Thinking Historically in the Present opens on 7 February.
  • The Gwangju Biennial: Soft and Weak Like Water opens on 7 April.
  • Celebration Picasso 1973-2023
  • Vermeer opens at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, on 10 February.

Top Art Exhibition Tours: ‘Matisse In The 1930s’ (2023)

Philadelphia Museum of Art – Curator Matthew Affron and the artists walked through “Matisse in the 1930s,” discussing which works would inspire their murals.

Matisse in the 1930s features a collection of the legendary artist’s work during a decade of artistic exploration—from experimentation, to failure, to renewal—with Philadelphia as a backdrop.

By 1930, Henri Matisse had achieved significant international renown, yet he found himself in a deep creative slump. The turning point came with a commission to decorate the main gallery of the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia. The resulting monumental mural, The Dance (1930–33), turned Matisse’s artistic practice around.

Previews: Photograph Magazine – Jan/Feb 2023

Cover: ©Uta Barth, Thinking about…“In the Light and Shadow of Morandi” (detail), 2018. Courtesy Getty Museum

Photograph Magazine – January-February 2023:

A Career-Spanning Survey of Uta Barth’s Rigorous, Seductive Photographs

The German-born photographer’s precise work, on view at the Getty Center, explores what it’s like to see and perceive our surroundings.

Mary Ellen Bartley

The photographs in Mary Ellen Bartley’s series Morandi’s Books – meditative still life compositions in muted colors transformed by collage elements – are gently disorienting despite their formal precision. 

Cover of Twenty-five Years Ago, by Joan Lyons (Visual Studies Workshop Press, 1998)

Arts & Culture: Frieze Magazine – Jan/Feb 2023

Issue 233: out now - Announcements - e-flux

frieze Magazine – January / February 2023 issue:

In the January/February issue of friezeTerence Trouillot profiles artist Henry Taylor ahead of shows at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Plus, one year after Russia declared war on Ukraine, artists and writer respond to the crisis in a dossier, including: a personal essay by painter and writer Kateryna AliinykAdam Mazur profiles Taras Gembik, an artist and performer organising picnics to raise money for Ukraine in Warsaw, Poland; Nikita Kadan on what art can mean in a time of war; editor-in-chief Andrew Durbin interviews Olha Honchar, the director of Territory of Terror Museum, which documents war crimes, and the coordinator for the Museum Crisis Center, an organization helping Ukrainian museums rescue their holdings from occupied zones. 

Profile: Henry Taylor
“I became the observer because I was trying to understand my own life and that’s why I started making pictures. I just like looking at people.” Terence Trouillot considers how Henry Taylors oeuvre goes far beyond the canvas. 

International Art: Apollo Magazine – January 2023

Current Issue | Apollo – The International Art Magazine | Apollo Magazine

Apollo Magazine – January 2023 Issue

The landscape that shaped Gainsborough’s view of the world

Wooded landscape with Herdsman Seated

The painter’s house in Suffolk now tells a compelling story about his formative influence

The royal christening gift that did sterling service

George II gave his god-daughter a decorative silver bowl that was later put to surprisingly practical use