Tag Archives: Italy

Top New Travel Videos: “Giants Whispers” In Dolomites & Juian Alps Of Italy By Bruno Pisani (2020)

Filmed and Edited by: Bruno Pisani

Music by: James Everingham

A timelapse video shot during my summer adventures especially in the Dolomites and Julian Alps. The rugged peaks of this wonderful mountain area, combined with misty and cloudy conditions created some spectacular movements that I was able to capture with timelapse. This video is the result of countless adventures in the mountains, long and hard hikes and early alarms. Hope you enjoy!

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Travel & Quarantines: Author Frances Mayes Writes Of Poet John Keats In Naples, Italy In 1820 (NYT)

From the New York Times (March 26, 2020):

I have seen Naples from his vantage of a ship anchored offshore — one of the most sublime locations in the world, that sweep of coast stacked with apricot, carmine, azure and rose villas; the blue, blue U of the harbor; the emphatic Vesuvius anchoring the view. 

Frances Mayes
Frances Mayes

In October of 1820, typhus raged in Naples. With his artist friend, Joseph Severn, the British poet John Keats rocked in the city’s harbor for 10 days, not nearly the quaranta giorni — 40 days — that give us our word quarantine.

Before this journey, Keats always felt intense melancholy. In “On Seeing the Elgin Marbles for the First Time,” he wrote “… mortality / Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep.” (And in the smooth pentameter of “Ode to a Nightingale”: “I have been half in love with easeful death.”) Not a holiday, this voyage out of England was a desperate trip to the sunny climate of Italy. His cough had grown steadily worse. Since the morning he’d seen a splotch of blood on his pillow, he knew he had little chance of surviving the consumption that had invaded his lungs. His last-ditch: Go to Rome. Meanwhile, exile at sea.

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Auto Racing Nostalgia: “Targa Florio” Endurance Race In Sicily (1906 – 1977)

1951 Targa Florio PosterThe Targa Florio was an open road endurance automobile race held in the mountains of Sicily near the island’s capital of Palermo. Founded in 1906, it was the oldest sports car racing event, part of the World Sportscar Championship between 1955 and 1973. While the first races consisted of a whole tour of the island, the track length in the race’s last decades was limited to the 72 kilometres (45 mi) of the Circuito Piccolo delle Madonie, which was lapped 11 times.

After 1973, it was a national sports car event until it was discontinued in 1977 due to safety concerns. It has since been run as a rallying event, and is part of the Italian Rally Championship.

1967 Targa Florio PosterThe race was created in 1906 by the wealthy pioneer race driver and automobile enthusiast, Vincenzo Florio, who had started the Coppa Florio race in BresciaLombardy in 1900. The Targa also claimed to be a worldly event not to be missed. Renowned artists, such as Alexandre Charpentier and Leonardo Bistolfi, were commissioned to design medals. A magazine was initiated, Rapiditas, which aimed to enhance, with graphic and photographic reproductions of the race, the myth of the car and the typical character of modern life, speed.[1]

1973 Targa Florio PosterOne of the toughest competitions in Europe, the first Targa Florio covered 3 laps equalling 277 miles (446 km) through multiple hairpin curves on treacherous mountain roads, at heights where severe changes in climate frequently occurred. Alessandro Cagno won the inaugural 1906 race in nine hours, averaging 30 miles per hour (50 km/h).

By the mid-1920s, the Targa Florio had become one of Europe’s most important races, as neither the 24 Hours of Le Mans nor the Mille Miglia had been established yet. Grand Prix races were still isolated events, not a series like today’s F1.

After winning the race several times, Porsche named the hardtop convertible version of the 911 after the Targa. The name targa means plaque or plate, see targa top.

From Wikipedia

Travel Videos: “Dolomites Symphony” In Northern Italy By Mark Soetebier

Directed and edited by: Mark Soetebier

The Dolomites are 10 years of Unesco, for this occasion I selected the most beautiful video frames on Vimeo to package this video, hoping that the Coronavirus will leave this beautiful world and life will resume its “better” path than before.

Top New Travel Video Dolomites Symphony 2020 produced by Mark Soetebier

Let yourself be dazzled by the monumental beauty of the Italian Dolomites, with majestic pinnacles, pillars, spiers and rocky faces that change color at different points throughout the day. This short video documentary is a collection of the most beautiful frames on the Dolomites made by Vimeo photographers.

The video frames are by: Joren de Jager, Marius Winkler, Lumen Art Studio, Ales, David Perucchin, Stefan Kellner, Gaetan Piolot, Ski Center Latemar, Alvern Ariston, Suedtirolvideo.it, Coral Climb / Lucas Preti, Mark Soetebier

Music by: Generdyn, Luke Atencio, May, Daniel Deuche, Jordan Crut

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History: “The Destruction of Pompeii and Its Aftermath” (Penn Museum)

When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 CE, it buried Pompeii, Herculaneum, and the surrounding settlements under nearly 20 feet of volcanic ash and pumice. Pliny the Elder, a Roman writer, documented his eyewitness account of the disaster, supporting the archaeological evidence uncovered there in the last two centuries.

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This Great Lecture reviews how these buried cities and their exploration have had a lasting impact on European and American culture. C. Brian Rose, Ph.D., Curator-in-Charge, Mediterranean Section, Penn Museum; Immediate Past President, Archaeological Institute of America; Trustee, American Academy in Rome

Urban Culture Podcasts: “Milan – City Life Under Quarantine” (Monocle 24)

The Urbanist Monocle 24 podcastMonocle 24 “The Urbanist” discusses the impact that quarantines can have on cities and what lessons city planners can learn when an outbreak causes borders to close. Here is a report from the ground on the changing nature of city life in Milan.