Tag Archives: Science Magazines

Covers: Science News Magazine – July 2, 2022

cover of the July 2, 2022 Science News

Cover Preview: Nature Magazine – June 30, 2022

Volume 606 Issue 7916

Order out of chaos

The cover shows an artistic representation of various cancer cells. The large-scale gains, losses and rearrangements of DNA seen in chromosomal instability are a typical feature of cancer — but there is no comprehensive framework to decode the causes of this genomic variability and their possible links to disease. In this week’s issue, Florian Markowetz, Geoff Macintyre and their colleagues present such a framework with a compendium of 17 signatures of chromosomal instability that can be used to predict how tumours might respond to drugs and that help to identify future therapeutic targets. The team created the compendium by examining 7,880 tumours representing 33 types of cancer. In a separate paper, Nischalan Pillay and colleagues examined 9,873 cancers to generate 

Preview: New Scientist Magazine – July 2, 2022

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How readily should we swallow the idea of diets that delay ageing?

The promise of a new diet that can add as much as a decade to your life is certainly tempting – and might well be proven to work – but for now should be swallowed with a pinch of salt

  • FEATURES Ten years after the Higgs discovery, what now for particle physics?
  • NEWS 75 per cent of the world’s top websites allow bad passwords
  • NEWS Largest known bacteria in the world are visible to the naked eye
  • NEWS Was warfare responsible for the origin of complex civilisation?

Cover Preview: Scientific American – July 2022

SPACE EXPLORATION

Record-Breaking Voyager Spacecraft Begin to Power Down

The pioneering probes are still running after nearly 45 years in space, but they will soon lose some of their instruments

By Tim Folger

EDUCATION

Subverting Climate Science in the Classroom

Oil and gas representatives influence the standards for courses and textbooks, from kindergarten to 12th grade

By Katie Worth

PSYCHOLOGY

How Parents’ Trauma Leaves Biological Traces in Children

Adverse experiences can change future generations through epigenetic pathways

By Rachel Yehuda

EVOLUTION

Toxic Slime Contributed to Earth’s Worst Mass Extinction–And It’s Making a Comeback

Global warming fueled rampant overgrowth of microbes at the end of the Permian period. Such lethal blooms may be on the rise again

By Chris Mays, Vivi Vajda and Stephen McLoughlin

COSMOLOGY

Astronomers Gear Up to Grapple with the High-Tension Cosmos

A debate over conflicting measurements of key cosmological properties is set to shape the next decade of astronomy and astrophysics

By Anil Ananthaswamy

COMPUTING

‘Momentum Computing’ Pushes Technology’s Thermodynamic Limits

Overheating is a major problem for today’s computers, but those of tomorrow might stay cool by circumventing a canonical boundary on information processing

By Philip Ball

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – June 25, 2022

New Scientist Default Image

COVER STORIES

  • CULTURE Earth’s musical heritage finds an icy home next to global seed vault
  • FEATURES Personalised cancer vaccines are finally beating hard to treat tumours
  • NEWS Enormous impact flash seen lighting up Jupiter’s atmosphere

Cover Previews: Nature Magazine – June 23, 2022

The science of inequality

To study inequality is to confront a world of contrasts: excessive wealth next to palpable poverty; sickness abutting health. The COVID pandemic has exposed and worsened many such disparities. This week, Nature presents a special collection of articles focusing on the researchers trying to quantify and reduce inequality. Whether they are measuring the effects of the pandemic or testing interventions to lift people out of poverty, the message is simple: gathering the right information will help to mitigate the harm caused by inequality.

Cover image: Mike McQuade.

Volume 606 Issue 7915

Table of Contents

  1. The science of inequality
  2. This Week
  3. News in Focus
  4. Opinion
  5. Research
  6. Amendments & Corrections
  7. Nature Outlook

Cover Preview: Nature Magazine – June 16, 2022

Volume 606 Issue 7914

Living the high life

The cover image shows plants growing at altitude on Altar Volcano in Chimborazo, Ecuador. Extreme altitudes pose challenges for most forms of life, and flowering plants are no exception. But flowering plants have been found growing as high as 6,400 metres above sea level. In this week’s issue, Michael Holdsworth and his colleagues reveal a molecular mechanism that helps plants to adapt to the extremes of altitude. The researchers studied a range of plants, representing four diverse clades of flowering plants — thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), tomato, poppy and the grass 

Brachypodium distachyon. They found that plants use genetic adaptations to adjust their sensitivity to atmospheric oxygen, whose partial pressure decreases with altitude. By decoding the ambient oxygen level, the plants are able to sense the altitude at which they grow and optimize internal biochemical processes.

Cover image: Cristian Miño, Ecuador.

Cover Preview: Nature Magazine – June 9, 2022

Hidden treasure

The Casarabe people lived in southwest Amazonia around AD 500–1400, but understanding of this culture has been limited because the archaeological remains are covered in dense forest. In this week’s issue, Heiko Prümers and his colleagues reveal the discovery of new Casarabe settlements in the Bolivian Amazon. The researchers used lidar to scan the forest, revealing 2 large settlements (each covering more than 100 hectares) and 24 smaller sites, 15 of which had previously been known to exist.

Volume 606 Issue 7913

The cover image shows Cotoca, one of the two large settlements,  in which earthen mounds (one more than 20 metres high) and long causeways can clearly be seen. The team suggests that these results are the first evidence of agrarian-based, low-density urbanism in western Amazonia. They conclude that the region was not as sparsely populated in pre-Hispanic times as was previously thought.

Cover image: Heiko Prümers/DAI.