Tag Archives: Oceans

Views: Whale Sharks Off Coast Of Cancun, Mexico

CBS Sunday Morning – We leave you this Sunday morning with whale sharks near Holbox Island off the coast of Cancun, in Mexico. Videographer: Lance Milbrand.

As the largest fish in the sea, reaching lengths of 40 feet or more, whale sharks have an enormous menu from which to choose. Fortunately for most sea-dwellers—and us!—their favorite meal is plankton. They scoop these tiny plants and animals up, along with any small fish that happen to be around, with their colossal gaping mouths while swimming close to the water’s surface.

Filter Feeding

The whale shark, like the world’s second largest fish, the basking shark, is a filter feeder. In order to eat, the beast juts out its formidably sized jaws and passively filters everything in its path. The mechanism is theorized to be a technique called “cross-flow filtration,” similar to some bony fish and baleen whales.

Top New Science Books: ‘Oceans Under Glass’ By Samantha Muka (Dec ’22)

Oceans under Glass

Oceans under Glass – Tank Craft and the Sciences of the Sea

By Samantha Muka

Aquarist knowledge is an often overlooked but vital part of marine research

A welcome dive into the world of aquarium craft that offers much-needed knowledge about undersea environments.

The art of aquarium science

Atlantic coral is rapidly disappearing in the wild. To save the species, they will have to be reproduced quickly in captivity, and so for the last decade conservationists have been at work trying to preserve their lingering numbers and figure out how to rebuild once-thriving coral reefs from a few survivors. Captive environments, built in dedicated aquariums, offer some hope for these corals. This book examines these specialized tanks, charting the development of tank craft throughout the twentieth century to better understand how aquarium modeling has enhanced our knowledge of the marine environment.

Science Magazine – December 22, 2022

Image showing first page of PDF

 

Reviews: ‘Avatar – The Way Of Water’ – The Science Of James Cameron’s 2022 Film

National Geographic – James Cameron is diving into the deep: this time, into the oceans of an alien world. The director shares how Earth’s oceans inspired The Way of Water—and his hope it will motivate viewers to protect our own planet.

National Geographic recently spoke with Cameron from New Zealand about the science and technology of The Way of Water. What inspired these creatures, and how did Cameron and his team bring them to life?

Read the article to find out: https://on.natgeo.com/3VWciu5

Science: How Advanced Computer Models Project Future Climate Scenarios

Princeton University (December 13, 2022) – Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces interact and combine in powerful, yet often unseen, ways as part of a complex planetary system that determines the climate.

Over many decades, researchers at Princeton University have played a leading role in the development of advanced computational models that simulate interactions among these elements to inform an understanding of future climate scenarios under varying conditions.

In this video, climate scientists Gabe Vecchi and Laure Resplandy discuss how computational models are used to project future climate scenarios and inform mitigation strategies.

READ MORE

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Oct 6, 2022

Volume 610 Issue 7930

Deflecting asteroids is not enough — we need to know when they approach

After NASA’s DART asteroid-deflection experiment, a fully funded telescope for detecting space rocks is an equally pressing priority.

The oceans store more carbon than thought — but not enough to save the planet

Although the marine ‘carbon sink’ is bigger than expected, it is still inadequate to keep global warming at bay.

Electric cars could break the grid if future drivers stick to today’s routines

The rise in electric-vehicle ownership could overload the electric grid unless charging becomes a daytime activity.

Indonesia Views: South Sea Cultured Pearl Farms

South Sea pearls are the largest cultured-pearl variety, sometimes reaching over 20 millimeters in diameter. The Pinctada maxima oyster can take up to five years to produce a single South Sea pearl, whereas more common freshwater oysters can take as little as three months and create dozens of pearls. This long cultivation process makes South Sea pearls rarer — and more expensive. A single South Sea pearl can cost $1,500, and a necklace can reach over $200,000. So, how are these pearls grown? And what makes them so expensive?

Cover Preview: Scientific American – August 2022

Mystery, Discovery and Surprise in the Oceans
Credit: Scientific American, August 2022

Mystery, Discovery and Surprise in the Oceans

Bizarre sea creatures, a new view of the ocean, the race to the moon, and more

We humans may think of ourselves, or possibly beetles, as typical Earthlings, but to a first approximation, life on Earth exists in the sea. And what spectacular life! Our special package on the oceans is teeming with images of eerie, delicate, elaborate, glowing and occasionally kind of frightening creatures that have rarely been seen by terrestrial species. The in-depth report was guided by sustainability senior editor Mark Fischetti along three main themes: mystery, discovery and surprise.

National Geographic: The Bermuda Triangle Myth

The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle, is an urban legend focused on a loosely-defined region in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean where a number of aircraft and ships are said to have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. 

For centuries, scientists have struggled to explain why hundreds of ships disappear when they reach the Bermuda Triangle. This area in the Atlantic Ocean is home to approximately 300 vessels, with several of these ships capsizing under mysterious circumstances. Today, experts are diving into these crystal clear waters to visit some of the abandoned shipwrecks and determine why they never made it to dry land.

New Short Films: ‘Water III’

A short film about my affinity for the ocean, its mystery and power. No project challenges me more creatively and physically; making these films is the absolute honor of a lifetime.

Filmed in: Tahiti, Indonesia, Hawaii, Australia, Barbados, Maldives, Philippines and California

Filmed and Edited by: Morgan Maassen

Music: “Movies” by Weyes Blood