Tag Archives: London

Poetic Views: London’s ‘Maida Vale’ Inspired Lord Byron & Robert Browning

The new crop of Italianate villas, iced white with stucco like giant cakes, and the rows of brick terraces and mansion blocks that followed them soon became home to publishers (Charles Ollier), artists (Sir John Tenniel) and poets: Robert Browning lived at 19, Warwick Crescent for more than 20 years and the pool where the Grand Union and Regent’s canals meet is now called after him.

Watercolor Paintings by Liam O’Farrell

Although Browning has been credited with naming the canal area Little Venice, it was Byron that first (facetiously) compared the basin to the Italian lagoon.

Carla Passino – April 16, 2021

Story has it that the poet used to walk along the Paddington arm of the Grand Union Canal with his publisher, John Murray — helpfully pointing to the bridge where another publisher had once drowned himself — and was inspired to write that ‘there would be nothing to make the canal of Venice more poetical than that of Paddington, were it not for its artificial adjuncts’; a fair point, considering that, at the time, the London canals were lined with warehouses and wrapped in soot.

Even today, however, the elegant terraces halfway up Randolph Avenue, with their tripartite arched windows, are far more reminiscent of the Italian city than Little Venice itself, where the serene buildings and tree-lined banks have a rather more bucolic feel.

Read more at Country Life UK

Liam O’Farrell website

River Views: Boat Tour Of Thames River, London (4K)

The River Thames, known alternatively in parts as the River Isis, is a river that flows through southern England including London. At 215 miles, it is the longest river entirely in England and the second-longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn.

RIVER BUS STOPS 00:00​▪️North Greenwich (The O2) 11:41​▪️Greenwich 15:51​▪️Masthouse Terrace 18:29​▪️Greenland (Surrey Quays) 20:44​▪️Canary Wharf 28:23​▪️St. Katharine’s Pier 25:59​▪️Tower Bridge 32:54​▪️London Bridge City Pier 36:24​▪️Bankside Pier 44:57​▪️Embankment 47:26​▪️Westminster Pier 52:29​▪️Millbank

Media: Swiss Magazine ‘Transhelvetica’ And London’s ‘Spiritland’

We visit two bold companies finding canny ways to pivot their product for changing audiences. Transhelvetica, a Swiss magazine, and Spiritland, a London-based hospitality and audio venture, are each shaping the media landscape for the better. To discover more about Monocle magazine head to http://www.monocle.com

Views: London’s ‘Royal Albert Hall’ At 150 Years

Over the 150 years that have passed since this opening, the Royal Albert Hall has established itself as one of the most important public venues in Britain, instantly recognisable as a backdrop to everything from the BBC Proms to comedy shows and from sporting events to theatre.

John GoodallApril 4, 2021

As described by Marcus Binney (COUNTRY LIFE, March 25, 1971) and The Survey of London, vol 38 (1975), the future Royal Albert Hall was one product of this initiative. The idea of building a music hall on the estate was first proposed in 1853, but, two years later, Prince Albert suggested something more ambitious: a music hall within an enclosing quadrangle of shops and flats inspired by the Palais Royale. He also directed that his exiled compatriot, Gottfried Semper, the architect of the Dresden opera house, design it.

Read full article in Country Life