Tag Archives: Africa

New Travel Books: “New York Times Explorer – 100 Trips Around The World”

Taschen LogoNYT Explorer. 100 Trips Around the World takes travel beyond the obvious with adventures in exotic places and new perspectives in familiar ones, all based on the distinguished travel journalism of The New York Times. Each journey features a first-person narrative and postcard-perfect photography, capturing the unique personality of the destination—as well as practical information to help get you on your way. 

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Whether it’s a culinary adventure in vibrant Mexico City, an historic and meditative train ride through Siberia, or a solo trip to Paris, get your bucket lists ready and share in the discoveries of Explorer a collection of 100 dream destinations—four volumes’ worth of adventures in onefrom the Travel pages of The New York Times.

The Times writers offer guidance, from the personal to the practical, along with a wealth of color photographs that capture the catch-your-breath awe of each destination. Motor past pink sands and bougainvillea in Bermuda with Andrew McCarthy, follow Virginia Woolf’s footsteps through the English countryside with Francine Prose, or dare to pilot a boat through the Venice lagoon with Tony Perrottet.

The editor

Barbara Ireland edits the 36 HoursExplorer, and forthcoming Cultured Traveler series of travel books in collaboration with The New York Times and TASCHEN. A writer and editor based in upstate New York, she is a former deputy Travel editor and deputy Op-Ed page editor at The New York Times. She is a graduate of Cornell University and was a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford University.

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Top Home Design: “House Of The Tall Chimneys” In Waterberg, South Africa -Frankie Pappas Architects

House of the Tall Chimneys - Frankie Pappas Architects - South AfricaThe brief: A bed amidst the trees; a shower amongst the rocks, the site sits in a nature conservation in rural South Africa; where trees and shrubs and rocks create the architectural backdrop for any home.

A bedroom that opens itself out into the treescape; that invites in the smells, and wind, and rustle; a bathroom that grounds itself against the landscape; that speaks of earth, and rock, and shrub.

House of the Tall Chimneys - Frankie Pappas Architects - South Africa

The idea: The originating idea was to root the bathroom into the rockscape, whilst allowing the bedroom to float amongst the trees. The building is organised as a long thin building which allows it to fit snugly between the forest trees. The two chimneys are not only essential to the structure of the building, but also naturally ventilate the bedroom  (the building was designed in such a manner as to not disturb any tree during construction).

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Top New Travel Videos: “Days In Morocco” By Gabworks (2020)

Filmed and Edited by: Gabworks

Shot in Beautiful Cities in Morocco:

Casablanca, Asilah, Tangier, Chefchaouen, Fes, Merzouga, Boumalne Dades, Marrakech, Essaouira

Music by Nils Frahm ‘sweet little lie’

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Morocco, a North African country bordering the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, is distinguished by its Berber, Arabian and European cultural influences. Marrakesh’s medina, a mazelike medieval quarter, offers entertainment in its Djemaa el-Fna square and souks (marketplaces) selling ceramics, jewelry and metal lanterns. The capital Rabat’s Kasbah of the Udayas is a 12th-century royal fort overlooking the water.

Podcast: America’s Covid-19 Response, Hong Kong & African Mercenaries

The Economist Editors Picks Podcast logoA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30).

 

Global News: Flattening The Climate Curve, Lifting Lockdowns & Arrest Of Africa’s Most Wanted Man

The Economist Editors Picks Podcast logoA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the chance to flatten the climate curve, when, why and how to lift coronavirus lockdowns (9:25) and the arrest of Africa’s most wanted man (17:25).  

 

Top Photography Books: “Zanzibar” By Aline Coquelle (Assouline)

Zanzibar Travel & Photography Book - Assouline May 2020Off the coast of East Africa in the Indian Ocean sits an archipelago known as Zanzibar. It all started ten million years ago when the island of Pemba separated from mainland Africa and then ten thousand years ago, the island of Unguja followed suit. Thus, begins the legend of Zanzibar.

For centuries, Zanzibar has been the haven and gateway for explorers including Richard Burton and David Livingstone to penetrate the unknown African Continent. Forward to present day, and it is still possible to experience the unique wildlife whether that is by scuba diving off the coast of a private island, infinite lagoons, visiting mangroves or endemic wild forests; getting lost and immersing yourself into the historical labyrinthine streets of Stonetown.

Zanzibar Travel & Photography Book - Assouline May 2020

This cluster of islands is at a crossroads of cultures, featuring Omani architecture, Portuguese and British heritages as well as Swahili rituals.

Photographer Aline Coquelle shares an intimate portrait of a community bursting with life. With original photography, a disappearing, indigenous culture is preserved and celebrated. This volume invites the reader to experience the paradise that is Zanzibar.

With a degree in art history and anthropology, nomadic Parisian photographer Aline Coquelle has always traveled the world—she has lived and worked in Central and South America, Asia, and Africa and has been visiting Zanzibar for over twenty years. She contributes to prestigious international publications, and shoots marketing campaigns for luxury brands. Coquelle often works with silver film in order to keep alive the magic of old-time photography because she believes “transcending tradition is the new modernity” and her gelatin silver prints are sought by collectors worldwide. Her other books with Assouline are Palm Springs Style (2005); The Cartier Polo Games (2006); Polo: The Nomadic Tribe (2009); The Italian Dream: Wine, Heritage, Soul (2016); and Be Extraordinary, The Spirit of Bentley (2017).

Mirella Ricciardi is a renowned photographer and author. Her childhood in Kenya has inspired her work and she has published several volumes of photographs including Vanishing Africa (1971), African Saga (1981), and Vanishing Amazon (1991).

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Travel & Culture Videos: “Ethiopia – Natural Utopia” By Florence Lepavec (2020)

Filmed and Edited: Florence Lepavec

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Ethiopia, the ‘Roof of Africa’, the ’Cradle of Humanity’, the ‘Promised Land of Zion’…

It had been already given quite many designations.

Another one I also heard before going there for the first time, was ‘Ethiopia, the Africa for Beginners’. ??

Was it because, for the most part, Ethiopians are genuinely friendly, generous and rather naturally relax?
Was it because, as occidentals, we share a common religious identity, rooted in mutual values? Was it because
it is mainly safe for travellers?

For whatever reason it was, I did find the expression suiting me right down to the ground because apart
from Morocco, I had not yet stepped foot in deep Africa.

And actually, now that I am back, I could personally add another title: ‘Ethiopia, the Natural Utopia’.

Is that for its breath-taking Nature? For its colourful Spiritual Identity? For its beautiful People?
Or is that for all of these?

For this abundant land offering an incredible diversity of eco-systems and landscapes, going from arid
desert regions to Afroalpine up-lands breaking down into vertiginous abyss. A land combining peaks reaching
above 4000m and depressions as low as 125m below sea level. Mountains, forests, lakes, meadows, deserts and swamplands.

A diversity also found in the fauna, with some interesting endemic species like the Gelada, the red-hearted baboon
-a peaceful grass-heater with impressive canines.

Or either, for this fascinating primal religious form of Christianity, tinged with animist rituals and colourful arts.
A religious belief deeply infused into the People living according to spiritual principles and values. People trying
their best to give you their best. Everywhere I went, I left it with brothers and sisters. With a sense of home given
by their genuine gentleness and education and their natural sensitive and respectful nature, in deep connection with
Nature Itself. I left with lots of good memories and friends. Filled with Humanity.

The same Humanity our ancestor ‘Lucy’ and her siblings might have been creating some 3.2 million years ago, on the same lands.
On this antic land rich of a unique history and culture.

Those are all the reasons why I called my Ethiopia, ‘the Natural Utopia’: a land that potentially possesses
ideal (or perfect) qualities for People…

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