Tag Archives: Research

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 30, 2022

Image

The genetics of a long life

Genetically diverse mice and cross-species comparison uncover links to longevity

New Omicron strains may portend big COVID-19 waves

Emerging subvariants are more immune evasive than ever

Room-temperature superconductor claim retracted

After doubts grew, blockbuster Nature paper is withdrawn over objections of study team

University pandemic policies raise equity worries

Tenure delays and pandemic impact statements could backfire, some fear

Signs of state meddling seen in Russian academy election

Leader of Russia’s largest chipmaker elected president after incumbent’s sudden withdrawal

Fraud charges crumble in China Initiative cases

Judges reject claims that defendants defrauded agencies by not disclosing China ties

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – October 1, 2022

New Scientist Default Image

New Scientist Magazine – October 1, 2022:

We are finally waking up to the causes of insomnia and how to treat it

Millions of people struggle with insomnia, but the sleep disorder is now a solvable problem – and the most effective therapy might involve your smartphone rather than sleeping pills

Rebecca Wragg Sykes on the objects that reveal the Neanderthal mind

A third of scientists working on AI say it could cause global disaster

What’s the best recipe for bubble mixture? Scientists have the answer

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Sept 22, 2022

Volume 609 Issue 7928


A gentle lick or nibble makes this brain circuit buzz

Scientists identify a neuronal pathway in rats that drives ‘social grooming’, a behaviour that helps to hold animal communities together.

Warming Arctic brings jet-stream waviness and extreme weather

As high-level winds shift, heat and heavy rain can persist.

A diamond sensor shines at ‘seeing’ voltages

Crystalline device could be used to visualize voltages with high resolution, speed and stability.

A chocoholic’s best friends are the birds and the bats

The trees that provide the raw material for chocolate have a higher yield when the groves are accessible to certain species.

How did the sea cow cross the Pacific? At a ponderous paddle

A family tree of sea cows suggests that the dugong traversed an ocean to reach its present habitat.

Builder drones

Ground-based robots have potential for helping in the construction industry, but they are limited by their height. In this week’s issue, Mirko Kovac, Robert Stuart-Smith and their colleagues introduce highly manoeuvrable aerial robots that can perform additive 3D construction tasks. Inspired by natural builders such as wasps and bees, the researchers created BuilDrones (as shown on the cover) that can work in an autonomous team to perform 3D printing tasks using foam- or cement-based materials. They also created ScanDrones to assess the quality of the structures

 being built. The team hopes that this approach of ‘aerial additive manufacturing’ could help to build structures in difficult to access areas.

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 16, 2022

Image

Seasonal monsoon rainfall replenishes groundwater reserves in the Bengal basin of Bangladesh thanks to the region’s seemingly counterintuitive intensive dry-season irrigation practices, a new Science study finds.

Europe’s energy crisis hits science hard

Supercomputing and accelerator centers struggle with surging gas and electricity prices

Private venture tackles Long Covid, aims to test drugs soon

Initiative to explore whether coronavirus lingers in patients

U.S. Antarctic Program has ignored sexual harassment

Decades of complaints have gone unheeded by NSF and contractors managing operations, employees say

Polio returns in rich countries, but big outbreaks are unlikely

As New York state declares an emergency, experts are far more worried about a resurgence in low-income countries

Read that and more in this week’s issue: https://fcld.ly/dt1xr77

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Sept 15, 2022

Volume 609 Issue 7927

Monkeypox, COVID-19, AIDS: have we progressed so little?

Deaths and sufferings are not a failure of technology or knowledge, but a failure of will.

The world’s reservoirs are ageing — and belching out more methane

But carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the global reservoir-building spree in the 1960s and 1970s are falling.

The Jurassic vomit that stood the test of time

A fossilized pile of small bones is probably a meal that an animal heaved up 150 million years ago.

Rarest of elements yield their secrets with help from mighty metals

Surrounding an ion of curium with radiation-resistant clusters of other ions allows scientists to study the scarce substance.

Why some female hummingbirds mimic males: it’s all about nectar

Some female white-necked jacobins nab good feeding spots by adopting the flashy plumage of their bigger, brasher male counterparts.

A sugary diet wrecks gut microbes — and their anti-obesity efforts

A high-sugar diet unbalances the microbiome, so the body makes fewer of the gut immune cells that help to prevent metabolic disorders.

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Sept 9, 2022

Image

Twisty device explores alternative path to fusion

Revamped German stellarator should run longer, hotter and compete with tokamaks

New tech law offers billions for research

CHIPS act will fund microelectronics innovation and training through large partnerships

Warming of 1.5°C carries risk of crossing climate tipping points

Scientists call for concerted effort to forecast points of no return for ice, weather patterns, and ecosystems

California EV rules jolt battery science

Move to phase out gas-powered cars will force progress toward faster charging batteries

Fauci looks back—and ahead

Loved and hated, NIAID’s chief plots life after government

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – Sept 10, 2022

New Scientist Default Image

COVER STORIES

  • FEATURES – Beyond tired: Why fatigue sets in and how to tackle it
  • FEATURES – Quantum batteries: Strange technology that could provide instant power
  • FEATURES – The Pope’s AI adviser on ensuring algorithms respect human dignity
  • NEWS

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Sept 8, 2022

Volume 609 Issue 7926

Dinosaur distribution

The cover shows an artist’s impression of Mbiresaurus raathi, a newly discovered species of herbivorous dinosaur found in Zimbabwe and dating to around 230 million years ago.

Avalanches in remote peaks are revealed with old satellites’ aid

Archived data from Landsat 5, launched in 1984, and two newer sensors allow scientists to chart dangerous flows in Afghanistan.

Quick-dried Lystrosaurus ‘mummy’ holds clues to mass death in the Triassic

Reptiles that perished during a severe drought 250 million years ago are preserved as spreadeagled and mummified fossils.

Research: Free-Floating DNA And Oxidation Zones

On this week’s show: The U.S. government is partnering with academics to speed up the search for more than 80,000 soldiers who went missing in action, and how humans create their own “oxidation zone” in the air around them.

First up on the podcast this week, Tess Joosse is a former news intern here at Science and is now a freelance science journalist based in Madison, Wisconsin. Tess talks with host Sarah Crespi about attempts to use environmental DNA—free-floating DNA in soil or water—to help locate the remains of soldiers lost at sea. Also featured in this segment:

University of Wisconsin, Madison, molecular biologist Bridget Ladell Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution marine biologist Kirstin Meyer-Kaiser

Also this week, Nora Zannoni, a postdoctoral researcher in the atmospheric chemistry department at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, talks about people’s contributions to indoor chemistry. She chats with Sarah about why it’s important to go beyond studying the health effects of cleaning chemicals and gas stoves to explore how humans add their own bodies’ chemicals and reactions to the air we breathe. In a sponsored segment from Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for Custom Publishing, interviews Benedetto Marelli, associate professor at MIT, about winning the BioInnovation Institute & Science Prize for Innovation and how he became an entrepreneur. 

Research Preview: Science Magazine – September 2

Image

U.S. to require free access to papers on all research it funds

The plan, to start at the end of 2025, is a blow to journal paywalls, but its impact on publishing is unclear

Carbon dioxide detected around alien world for first time

Webb telescope discovery offers clue to planet formation and promises insights on planetary habitability

Researchers tackle vexing side effects of potent cancer drugs

Wider use of checkpoint inhibitor therapy spurs efforts to predict and treat immune complications

Omicron shots are coming—with lots of questions

Decisions on boosters targeting subvariants will be based on limited data

Zimbabwe find illuminates dawn of the dinosaurs

Nearly complete specimen shows earliest dinosaurs needed a temperate climate