Tag Archives: Coronavirus

Health Technology: “The Science Behind Artificial Blood” (WSJ Video)

The coronavirus pandemic led to shortages in the blood supply across the U.S. Scientists around the world are working on a potential solution. The Future of Everything looks at the process of making artificial blood.

Illustration: Timothy Wong

Covid-19: The Realities Of “Automated Contact Tracing” (Rand Video)

Ben Boudreaux, policy researcher with the RAND Corporation, describes how contact tracing can be used to track the spread of COVID-19 and explains the differences between manual and automated contact tracing.

Get more insights from RAND on the COVID-19 pandemic: https://www.rand.org/latest/covid-19….

Morning News Podcast: Republican Convention, California Wildfires

Axios’ Jonathan Swan says to expect less of a traditional Republican National Convention and more of a reality TV show, featuring President Trump every night.

  • Plus, how the pandemic makes fighting California wildfires even harder.
  • And, an exclusive Harris poll shows Americans agree on who should get a COVID vaccine first.

Guests: Axios’ Jonathan Swan, Sam Baker and freelance environmental reporter Miranda Green.

Global News: How Viruses Shape The World, Black Elites & British Missteps

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how viruses shape the world, (10:25) African-American elites and Black Lives Matter, (18:22) and how misrule by algorithm is failing Britain.

Top New Science Podcasts: 3D Printed Aerogels, Covid-19 Data & Sulfur

In this Nature podcast: a new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, the countries that collect Covid-19 data effectively, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids.

In this episode:

01:05 Printing aerogels

Aerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they’re difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common form of aerogel, opening up a range of potential new applications. Research Article: Zhao et al.

07:00 Coronapod

To provide targeted public health interventions during the pandemic, it’s vital that data are collected and shared effectively. We discuss the countries doing this well, and find out how fragmented systems are preventing epidemiologists from giving up-to-date information on outbreaks.

21:11 Research Highlights

Fats in the blood as a possible marker of autism, and the selfish component to solar panel adoption. Research Highlight: Fats in the blood linked to autismResearch Highlight: Self-interest powers decision to go solar

23:24 Liquid-liquid transitions

It’s been thought that some liquids may be able to exist in two distinct states, but evidence has been scarce. Now, researchers show that sulfur can exist in two liquid states, and have discovered some insights into how this might occur. Research Article: Henry et al.Video: 24 hours in a synchrotron

30:09 Briefing Chat

We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss the English language’s dominance in science, and how to make squid transparent. Symmetry: Physics in a second languageOneZero: The First Gene-Edited Squid in History Is a Biological Breakthrough

Infographics: The Major Challenges Restaurants Face Post Covid-19 (2020)

Restaurants must function at 75% capacity in order to achieve profitability. With many restaurants operating at 50% capacity or less, how do they make up the remaining 25%? The three main contributing factors are contactless dining, labor optimization and changing the customer journey. Learn more about how restaurants are recovering during the COVID-19 pandemic in this infographic by OneDine.

Infographics: “Inside Race for A Covid-19 Vaccine”

WASHINGTON POST (AUG 16, 2020): Researchers in the United States set an audacious goal in January to develop a coronavirus vaccine within 12 to 18 months. This would be a world record. The mumps vaccine is considered to be the fastest to move, in four years, from scientific concept to approval in 1967. The quest for an HIV vaccine continues, 36 years and counting.

Read more from Washington Post