Tag Archives: Architecture

Travel & Architecture: Bologna – The City Of Porticoes & Arcades

Design: The ‘ST/Songeun Building’ In Seoul, Korea

ST international and songeun art & cultural foundation unveil the result of a collaboration with herzog & de meuron. the group announces details of its new ST / songeun building which will celebrate its opening on september 30th with inaugural exhibitions, the first curated by the swiss architecture firm. expressed as a minimalistic concrete monolith, the gallery stands as herzog & de meuron’s first realized project in korea and will establish a significant landmark in seoul.

Architecture: Restored Georgian Buildings (UK)

English Country Houses: Blenheim Palace (1725)

Vast and impersonal country houses, built to create an impression on visitors rather than bestow creature comforts on inhabitants, had been a feature of the English landscape long before Blenheim Palace. Yet this huge complex, the house alone encompassing seven acres of Oxfordshire on completion in 1725, bore comparison with the largest palaces of Europe.

Set to become the historic seat of the Dukes of Marlborough after Queen Anne gifted the manor of Woodstock to the 1st Duke, John Churchill, in 1705, as a reward for his military triumphs, it’s the only English country house — those of bishops aside — that has by longstanding popular consent been accorded the honorific title of palace (it was once described by some as Blenheim Castle).

Architecture: ‘Inside-Out House’ In Westminster, UK

Architect Barbara Weiss likes to do things a little differently. Indeed, the last time we caught up with her was at her upside-down house: a converted pub in Westminster, central London, where she lives on the secluded top floors and sleeps on the lower floors (yes, it’s as brilliant as it sounds). This time, she’s giving us a tour of her latest self-designed home, which she’s aptly titled the inside-out house.

Previews: ‘M+’ Museum Of Contemporary Visual Culture In Hong Kong

The first global museum of contemporary visual culture in Asia is set to open to public in November 2021 in Hong Kong. As per the latest reports, the construction work of the iconic building, located in Hong Kong’s West Kowloon Cultural District, has completed. The museum will be dedicated to collecting, exhibiting, and interpreting visual art, design, and architecture, moving image, and Hong Kong visual culture of the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Designed by a global team of the world-renowned architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron in partnership with TFP Farrells and Arup, the M+ building is set to become a new addition to the global arts and cultural landscape and a new international architectural icon.

Architecture: ‘Building Bound to the Ground’

Dig deep into the origins of building. The ground, now often used as a passive foundation for going higher, is rife with possibilities. Bjarne Mastenbroek investigates the relationship architecture has, had, and will have, with site and nature. Through the photography of Iwan Baan and more than 500 analytical drawings by SeARCH, Dig it! dissects structures from the past millennia—some well-known, some previously overlooked. This global survey of nearly 1,400 pages, designed by Mevis & Van Deursen, brings architecture back in harmony with the Earth’s surface. Discover the book: https://www.taschen.com/04697yt

Scottish Country Houses: 18th C. ‘Wedderburn Castle’ In Berwickshire

Wedderburn Castle, Berwickshire, is one of Robert Adam’s less familiar commissions — yet just as extraordinary as many of his more famous buildings. Recently rescued from neglect by owners David Home Miller and Catherine Macdonald-Home, it has a fascinating story to tell about the development of his castle style.

Roger White, September 5, 2021

The ‘castle style’ of the Georgian era might be said to have been invented by Vanbrugh, who aimed to give ‘something of the castle air’ with his additions to Kimbolton Castle, Huntingdonshire, in 1707–10 .

In practice, that amounted to little more than a battlemented parapet applied to a completely symmetrical building. In the late 18th century, the architect Robert Adam was undoubtedly influenced by Vanbrugh, whose mastery of what he called ‘movement’ in architectural composition — ‘the rise and fall, the advance and recess with other diversity of form, in the different parts of a building’ — he admired (although he deplored the Baroque master’s ‘barbarisms and absurdities’).

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