Tag Archives: Food

Views: ‘Solomillo’ Steak In Barranquilla, Columbia

Barranquilla, the capital of Colombia’s Atlántico Department, is a bustling seaport flanked by the Magdalena River. The city is known for its enormous Carnival, which brings together flamboyantly costumed performers, elaborate floats and cumbia music. In the chic neighborhood of El Prado, the Museo Romántico showcases artifacts from past festivals and exhibits on famous Colombians, like writer Gabriel García Márquez.

Analysis: The Truth About Buying Organic Foods

The organic food industry is a booming business. U.S. organic sales surged in 2020, jumping by 12.4% to $61.9 billion. With consumers being more health conscious than ever, they’re willing to pay more for what they perceive as better. But, what exactly does “organic” mean?

Analysis: ‘Dark Stores’ Speed Up Grocery Delivery

Speedy grocery delivery is booming, but competition and high running costs could hinder growth. Startups are promising to deliver groceries to your doorstep in minutes, stepping up competition in the industry. Their strategy: to operate out of “dark stores.” WSJ visits some of these hyperlocal warehouses to see how they operate and the challenges they face. Photo/Video: Michelle Inez Simon

Views: Smoking Copper River Salmon In Alaska

In this video we are smoking some of my favorite fish; Copper River Red Salmon. We caught the salmon ourselves earlier this summer. We are using a simple brine made of water, salt and pure maple syrup. The smoking itself takes about two hours once the fish is properly dried. It is absolutely delicious.

The Copper River or Ahtna River, Ahtna Athabascan ‘Atna’tuu, “river of the Ahtnas”, Tlingit Eeḵhéeni, “river of copper”, is a 290-mile river in south-central Alaska in the United States. It drains a large region of the Wrangell Mountains and Chugach Mountains into the Gulf of Alaska. 

South Sudan: Thailand Peacekeepers Teach New Food & Farming Methods

With years of civil war having severely reduced agricultural output in South Sudan, Thai peacekeepers have set up agricultural demonstration plots in the capital city of Juba to teach residents how to successfully grow their own food using contemporary farming practices.

South Sudan, officially known as the Republic of South Sudan, is a landlocked country in east/central Africa.

Reviews: EU Approves Insects As ‘Food’ (Video)

Insects have long been a staple food in Asia. In Europe, not so much. But diets are changing, with ever more people trying to avoid meat – for health or moral reasons, or because raising farm animals is less and less sustainable. Now, the European Commission has officially declared mealworms to be food. It’s a game changer for insect farmers, many of whom have so far operated under temporary license. Insects are rich in protein: Up to 70 percent of their entire mass is protein. In addition to that, they’re also rich in healthy Omega-3 fatty acids, like fish. Some insects, especially the mealworm, have over 14 percent of fatty acids – that’s seven times as much as fish.

Innovation: ‘Brooklyn Dumpling Shop’ Rolls Out ‘Automat’ Food Service

Moving towards the future – by taking from the past? This is the story of how one restauranteur is drawing upon nostalgia in order to break into a new era of innovation in the food industry.

AUTOMAT HISTORY

Originally, the machines in U.S. automats took only nickels. In the original format, a cashier sat in a change booth[citation needed] in the center of the restaurant, behind a wide marble counter with five to eight rounded depressions. The diner would insert the required number of coins in a machine and then lift a window, hinged at the top, and remove the meal, usually wrapped in waxed paper. The machines were replenished from the kitchen behind. All or most New York automats had a cafeteria-style steam table where patrons could slide a tray along rails and choose foods, which were ladled from tureens.

The first automat in the U.S. was opened June 12, 1902, at 818 Chestnut St. in Philadelphia by Horn & Hardart; Horn & Hardart became the most prominent American automat chain. Inspired by Max Sielaff’s AUTOMAT Restaurants in Berlin, they became among the first 47 restaurants, and the first non-Europeans, to receive patented vending machines from Sielaff’s Berlin factory. The automat was brought to New York City in 1912 and gradually became part of popular culture in northern industrial cities.

The automats were popular with a wide variety of patrons, including Walter Winchell, Irving Berlin and other celebrities of the era. The New York automats were popular with unemployed songwriters and actors. Playwright Neil Simon called automats “the Maxim’s of the disenfranchised” in a 1987 article.