Tag Archives: Food

Healthy Diet Podcasts: “Spoon-Fed” Author & Professor Tim Spector

According to a recent study, obesity increases the risk of dying of Covid-19 by nearly 50%. Governments around the world are now hoping to encourage their citizens to lose weight. But with so much complex and often contradictory diet advice, as well as endless food fads, it can be hard to know what healthy eating actually looks like. 

How many pieces of fruit and vegetables should you eat a day? Will cutting out carbs help you lose weight? Is breakfast really the most important meal of the day? Speaking to Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London about his new book Spoon-Fed, Madeleine Finlay asks why we’re still getting food science wrong, and explores the current scientific evidence on snacking, supplements and calorie labels. 

Tim Spector is a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology and Director of the TwinsUK Registry at Kings College, London and has recently been elected to the prestigious Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He trained originally in rheumatology and epidemiology. In 1992 he moved into genetic epidemiology and founded the UK Twins Registry, of 13,000 twins, which is the richest collection of genotypic and phenotypic information worldwide. He is past President of the International Society of Twin Studies, directs the European Twin Registry Consortium (Discotwin) and collaborates with over 120 centres worldwide. He has demonstrated the genetic basis of a wide range of common complex traits, many previously thought to be mainly due to ageing and environment. Through genetic association studies (GWAS), his group have found over 500 novel gene loci in over 50 disease areas. He has published over 800 research articles and is ranked as being in the top 1% of the world’s most cited scientists by Thomson-Reuters. He held a prestigious European Research Council senior investigator award in epigenetics and is a NIHR Senior Investigator. His current work focuses on omics and the microbiome and directs the crowdfunded British Gut microbiome project. Together with an international team of leading scientists including researchers from King’s College London, Massachusetts General Hospital, Tufts University, Stanford University and nutritional science company ZOE he  is conducting the largest scientific nutrition research project, showing that individual responses to the same foods are unique, even between identical twins. You can find more on https://joinzoe.com/ He is a prolific writer with several popular science books and a regular blog, focusing on genetics, epigenetics and most recently microbiome and diet (The Diet Myth). He is in demand as a public speaker and features regularly in the media.

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Top Culinary Arts Videos: “Japanese Fried Rice” From Teppanyaki Hoen In Kyoto

Fried rice in Kyoto as part of a lunch menu, including Wagyu beef, vegetables, herbs and an egg.

Teppanyaki Hoen(鉄板焼 豊園) is a restaurant located on the 2nd floor of the Hotel Nikko Princess Kyoto.

This Teppanyaki restaurant commits on using the best ingredients when cooking your meal. High-quality Japanese Wagyu and seafood, fresh vegetables from the Kyoto area, and salt from France. Their theme is to provide the best fusion of Eastern and Western cuisine. There is also a sommelier present at the restaurant who can recommend you the best wine for your preference.

The restaurant is spacious and even has a private room, so you can come with children without any problems.

Travel & Cuisine: “Salina – Italy’s Island Of Wine, Capers & Pane Cunzatu”

ITALY MAGAZINE (Aug 25, 2020): Here, Michelin-star restaurants are hidden behind the secluded gates of family inns and the best wines are served by winemakers on a panoramic terrace using a vine leaf as a coaster while crystal clear waters are just a step away from the hydrofoils. And, though nothing lands in your lap since you have to climb through ferns and craters and puff along steep slopes to reach the most beautiful places and enjoy a magic sunset in the Pollara bay – it remains totally worth it. 

Pane cunzatu – literally, seasoned bread, is the most famous Aeolian specialty. It is different from the namesake recipe you can find all over the island, which is more similar to a sandwich. Here a huge, round flat loaf’s base is topped with a generous amount of local delicacies, resembling more a pizza.

Once upon a time Salina was considered the “lesser” of the Aeolian islands despite being the second biggest after Lipari with three different comuni of Santa Marina, Malfa and Leni and six volcanoes scattered around its 10-square mile surface. However, it was a place that silently carved out a very special place in the heart of island lovers. It smartly matched its wild nature and untamed spirit with a relaxed and friendly atmosphere offering a dashing bit of otherworldly hospitality.

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Videos: “Watermelons – History & Cultivation” Of Summer’s Favorite Fruit

There’s nothing that counteracts the heat of summer quite like a big, sweet, juicy slice of watermelon. Luke Burbank offers up the history and lore behind that thirst-quenching favorite.

Watermelon is a plant species in the family Cucurbitaceae, a vine-like flowering plant originally domesticated in West Africa. It is a highly cultivated fruit worldwide, having more than 1000 varieties. Watermelon is a scrambling and trailing vine in the flowering plant family Cucurbitaceae.

Infographics: The Major Challenges Restaurants Face Post Covid-19 (2020)

Restaurants must function at 75% capacity in order to achieve profitability. With many restaurants operating at 50% capacity or less, how do they make up the remaining 25%? The three main contributing factors are contactless dining, labor optimization and changing the customer journey. Learn more about how restaurants are recovering during the COVID-19 pandemic in this infographic by OneDine.

FOOD & AGRICULTURE: “The Robot Producing Crops Of The Future” (WSJ Video)

Arizona has what researchers call “the climate of tomorrow, today.” Scientists are using a 30-ton robotic field scanner in the state to study plant genetics and hopefully develop stress-resilient crops.

Photo: Jesse Rieser for The Wall Street Journal

More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com

Food & Nature: “The Wild Harvest – Mid Summer” With Chef Alan Bergo

 

Filmed and Directed by: Jesse Roesler

Produced by: Credo Nonfiction
Featuring: Alan Bergo, Forager Chef

Edited by: Sam Kaiser

From James Beard Award-winning filmmaker Jesse Roesler and renowned Forager Chef Alan Bergo, The Wild Harvest is a new foraging & cooking series that celebrates the beauty and bounty of nature and explores what’s culinarily possible with easily foraged wild foods. This series is being created safely during quarantine using social distancing measures.

Episode 3 features the bounty of mid summer in the northern hemisphere including a wild greens salad, walleye wrapped in squash leaves with chanterelles and a blueberry desert that captures the spirit of the pine barrens. Featured foraged ingredients include Lamb’s Quarters, Chickweed, Purslane, Bee Balm, Chanterelles, Wild Blueberries, Sweet Fern, Hazelnuts.

We hope to release a new episode every 3-4 weeks for free, but are currently seeking sponsors.

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Foods & Flavors: “The Story Of Vanilla” (CBS)

With so many of us staying at home these days and spending more time in the kitchen, vanilla sales, of all things, are booming. Correspondent Seth Doane travels to the island of Madagascar – which supplies 80% of the world’s vanilla – to learn more about the extraordinarily colorful (and sometimes unsavory) story of a familiar spice, and why this valuable cash crop can be worth more by weight than silver.

New Restaurants: “Ampia Rooftop NYC” – “Sanitary, Social Distance Dining”

Ampia Rooftop (Ampia meaning “Space” in Italian) is a sprawling 4,500 Sq. foot outdoor rooftop terrace featuring individual greenhouses for a social distance dining experience, opulent clusters of colorful flower gardens, and Italian-themed art and décor dispersed throughout. Chef Michele Iuliano offers up an authentic Italian menu of lite casual fare, along with a selection of inventive seafood paninis. 

Ampia Restaurant

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Restaurant Business (August 1, 2020) – The first step was a name change. When New York City announced that restaurants could open for outdoor dining during Phase 2, the Iulianos changed the name from Gnoccheria Rooftop to Ampia—a move that gave it a distinct identity. Then they set about redesigning the space to satisfy all the restrictions.

The entire space was sprayed with an electrostatic sanitary coating, including the tables, chairs, bar and every touchable surface. The process sanitizes for up to three months. The pair also purchased a facial recognition thermometer and all the essential PPE specified in New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Phase 2 guidelines.

Next, the space was reconcepted from the original 250-seat restaurant to an outdoor dining venue with a limited bar and food menu. The beer garden in the original plan had to be scrapped; it’s impossible to enforce social distancing in that kind of setting. Instead, tables were spread out and seating areas set far apart, accommodating 60 to 65 guests.

The regulations around social distancing state that if tables cannot be arranged six feet apart, a restaurant can use plexiglass dividers between them. But the Iulianos wanted to infuse Ampia with the same stylish elements that differentiate their other restaurants.

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Food Trends: American “Fresh Seaweed” Products Are Expanding (Podcast)

NPR PodcastAtlantic Sea Farms is the largest commercial seaweed farm in the U.S. They line-grow their seaweed in clear, icy cold Maine waters. The seaweed — which is sold frozen in pureed cubes and in ready to eat cut strands and fermented products — is never dyed or dehydrated.

Beyond sushi restaurants and roasted snacks, seaweed is increasingly accepted, appreciated, even adored, in American kitchens — and for good reason.

Seaweed is really good for you. It’s loaded with potassium, magnesium, Vitamin B12, iodine, omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, and tons of calcium. And then there’s the umami bomb of taste: briny, sweet, meaty, and vegetal are just some of the ways cooks describe the flavor of various seaweeds.

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