Top Science Podcasts: Researchers “Locked In Arctic Ice Flow”, “Spikes Of Plasma” Heating The Sun’s Corona (ScienceMag)

The Polarstern research vessel will spend 1 year locked in an Arctic ice floe. Aboard the ship and on the nearby ice, researchers will take measurements of the ice, air, water, and more in an effort to understand this pristine place. Science journalist Shannon Hall joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about her time aboard the Polarstern and how difficult these measurements are, when the researchers’ temporary Arctic home is the noisiest, smokiest, brightest thing around.

After that icy start, Sarah talks also with Tanmoy Samanta, a postdoctoral researcher at Peking University in Beijing, about the source of the extreme temperature of the Sun’s corona, which can be up to 1 million K hotter than the surface of the Sun. His team’s careful measurements of spicules—small, plentiful, short-lived spikes of plasma that constantly ruffle the Sun’s surface—and the magnetic networks that seem to generate these spikes, suggest a solution to the long-standing problem of how spicules arise and, at the same time, their likely role in the heating of the corona.

To read more: https://www.sciencemag.org/podcast/how-make-arctic-ship-vanish-and-how-fast-moving-spikes-are-heating-sun-s-atmosphere

Exercise Studies: Older Adults’ “Fragmented Physical Exercise” Linked To Higher Death Rates

From a National Institute On Aging release:

Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging Studies
Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging Studies

Fragmented physical activity, but not total daily activity, was significantly associated with death, the researchers found. For each 10% higher degree of activity fragmentation, mortality risk was 49% greater. The duration of physical activity also mattered: Participants who frequently engaged in short bouts of activity of less than five minutes were more likely to die than those whose activity bouts lasted five minutes or longer. These associations held after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index and other factors.

Daily physical activity, which benefits health and quality of life, typically decreases in older adults. A new study shows that higher fragmentation of that activity — more transitions from activity to sedentariness — may be a better indicator of risk of death than a person’s overall level of physical activity.

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, analyzed data from the NIA-supported Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), looking at a week’s worth of minute-by-minute physical activity for 548 healthy participants age 65 and older (average age, 76).

To read more: https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/fragmented-physical-activity-linked-higher-risk-death-older-adults

World Affairs Podcasts: Impeachment, Middle East Conflict And Aircraft Carriers (The Economist)

Economist RadioA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Democrats want impeachment hearings to change the public’s view of Donald Trump. That will be difficult. (10:50) The tangled politics surrounding a killing and its aftermath in Gaza. (16:30) And, for aircraft-carriers, bigger isn’t better.

Medical Podcasts: New Stanford Hospital Uses Technology To Stay “Future-Proofed”

From a Stanford Medicine online article:

Stanford Medicine“A simple example would be copper and fiber wires. When you’re putting wires in a new facility, it’s easier to put in many more than you need that moment because putting them in 5 years from now or 10 years from now is quite hard. Something like 85 percent of our copper wires and fiber optic cables are dark right now because we know we’re going to need them in the future.”

When you consider the fast pace of technological advances today, you wonder how do you go about building a new hospital and keep the technology relevant for 10, 20 or even 50 years?  I put that question to Stanford Health Care’s technology wiz Gary Fritz. He told me:

“We try to do something we call future-proof the hospital. We tried to make design decisions and technology decisions that allow us to move to the current or the next generation technology as easily as possible.”

 

Top Travel Accessories: PinFin’s “Alpha Jacket” Has Enough Pockets To “Replace A Backpack”

From a Yanko Design online review:

Alpha Jacket by PinFin (2)Alpha Jacket’s fabric is both stylish yet waterproof and wind-resistant, and its high-collar design and cut gives it the appeal of a casual blazer, but with reflective piping and a durable design that you can comfortably wear anywhere in the outdoors. Each jacket is armed with 8 pockets on the inside, for everything from your phone to your power-bank, keys, sunglasses, wallet, and even an iPad. Plus, a dedicated pouch for carrying a water-bladder to sip from while on the go. Pockets on the outside of the jacket find their place on the breast as well as the sleeve, secured with concealed YKK zippers that match the quality build of the rest of the jacket.

Alpha Jacket was built to truly support the often-traveler. Designed by Dan Truong and Linh Tran, a couple who endured a long-distance relationship and found themselves often traveling to meet each other, the Alpha Jacket sits at the intersection of “jacket that’s perfect for traveling” and “jacket I can step out for social events in”. For someone who finds themselves traveling often, the Alpha Jacket comes with a detachable hoodie that has a built-in neck pillow (you can choose between memory foam or microbeads) helping you get through long commutes, and for the alpha-human who wants to look their best, the jacket comes in a variety of four colors to choose from, with a cut that defines your silhouette just like a casual blazer would, but also gives you the advantage of storage so you don’t need to lug a backpack around with your stuff!

 

To read more: https://www.yankodesign.com/2019/11/13/this-urban-hoodie-packs-in-a-pillow-has-enough-space-so-you-can-ditch-your-backpack/

Artist Profile: Painter Claude Monet’s Birthday Celebrated At Denver Art Museum On November 14

Denver Art Museum Celebrates Claude Monet Birthday November 14The Denver Art Museum will celebrate famed French Impressionist Claude Monet’s birthday on November 14, 2019, in conjunction with the exhibition Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature. The DAM will celebrate the artist’s 179th birthday with cake, the launch of the DAM’s first-ever podcast titled Beyond Monet, the reveal of a Monet-inspired painting by local artist Ashley Joon, a special Art & About program dedicated to Monet’s birthday, and a surprise Monet-themed gift bag for one lucky visitor.

Born in Paris on November 14, 1840, Claude Monet was a prolific painter and founder of the French Impressionist movement, bridging the gap between the artistic movements of the 19th century and the modernized art world of the 20th century. Monet lived a long life and had an extensive artistic career that spanned nearly 70 years. In the Monet exhibition, visitors can see more than 120 works by Monet, including the first painting Monet ever exhibited when he was just 18 years old, along with some of his very last paintings.

To read more: https://denverartmuseum.org/article/celebrate-monets-birthday-dam-november-14

 

Top New Travel Videos: “Urban Nature” In Alberta, Canada By Sebastian Linda

Filmed, Edited and Directed by: Sebastian Linda

Co-Directed by: Steffen Krones
Sound Design: Bony Stoev
Music by: Sherryl Sewepagaham (“Children’s Blessing”)

Urban Nature Travel Short Film In Alberta Canada By Sebastian Linda 2019

Most of us are living urban lifes full of to-do lists and Deadlines. But when heading out into nature our perspective changes, giving back value to experience and creating awareness for our daily urban lifes.

This is what we experienced this year in Alberta, Canada.

Urban Nature Travel Short Film In Alberta Canada By Sebastian Linda 2019

In Cooperation with Travel Alberta
travelalberta.com
instagram.com/travelalberta/