Culinary Road Trips: Calgary West To Canmore, Banff, Lake Louise & Back Again (9 Days, 250 Miles)

From a Bon Appétit magazine online article:

Bon Appetit CanadaWhile the drive from Calgary to Jasper can easily be done in a day, I recommend taking at least a week to travel there and back. That leaves plenty of time to find adventure off the main road, spend some nights in the backcountry, and explore each town along the route.

When it comes to eating, exploring, and slumbering in the best log cabins, here’s a road-tripping itinerary that’ll get you away from the crowds and out among those big rocks.

  • CALGARY – DAY 1: Eat, shop, and stock up on snacks in a city nicknamed “Cowtown” – The bureka plate from universally adored Sidewalk Citizen (618 Confluence Way SE, Calgary, AB) is an ideal breakfast—the sesame-topped, feta-filled pastry is stuffed with a fried egg and served with a lemony cucumber and tomato salad, a hefty spoonful of hummus, and the housemade green or red harissa.
  • CANMORE – DAY 2: See how they do afternoon tea Rockies style – For dinner in Canmore, Where the Buffalo Roam Saloon (626 Main St. #2, Canmore, AB) is an intimate candlelit bar and restaurant popular with locals.
  • BANFF – DAY 3: (Safely) scale a mountain, then go back in time

To read more: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/canadian-rockies-road-trip

 

New Science Podcasts: Archaeologists Study Slavery In Caribbean, “WEIRD” Psychology

scimag_pc_logo_120_120 (2)Most historical accounts of slavery were written by colonists and planters. Researchers are now using the tools of archaeology to learn more about the day-to-day lives of enslaved Africans—how they survived the conditions of slavery, how they participated in local economies, and how they maintained their own agency. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about a Caribbean archaeology project based on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and launched by the founders of the Society for Black Archaeologists that aims to unearth these details. Watch a related video here.

Sarah also talks with Jonathan Schulz, a professor in the Department of Economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, about a role for the medieval Roman Catholic Church in so-called WEIRD psychology—western, educated, industrialized, rich, democratic. The bulk of psychology experiments have used participants that could be described as WEIRD, and according to many psychological measures, WEIRD subjects tend to have some extreme traits, like a stronger tendency toward individuality and more friendliness with strangers. Schulz and colleagues used historical maps and measures of kinship structure to tie these traits to strict marriage rules enforced by the medieval Catholic Church in Western Europe. Read related commentary.

 

Health Studies: Chronic Inflammation Reduced By Exercise, Lowering Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

From a Harvard news online release:

Massachusetts General Hospital“This study identifies a new molecular connection between exercise and inflammation that takes place in the bone marrow and highlights a previously unappreciated role of leptin in exercise-mediated cardiovascular protection,” said Michelle Olive, program officer at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Division of Cardiovascular Sciences. “This work adds a new piece to the puzzle of how sedentary lifestyles affect cardiovascular health and underscores the importance of following physical-activity guidelines.”

Scientists at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have identified a previously unknown biological pathway that promotes chronic inflammation and may help explain why sedentary people have an increased risk for heart disease and strokes.

In a study to be published in the November issue of Nature Medicine, MGH scientists and colleagues at several other institutions found that regular exercise blocks this pathway. This discovery could aid the development of new therapies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

To read more: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2019/11/exercise-found-to-block-chronic-inflammation-in-mice/

World Affairs Podcasts: French President In China, Demographics In Texas And Public Groping In Japan (The Economist)

The Intelligence EconomistThis week our correspondent joined Emmanuel Macron on his visit to China. The French president is stretching his diplomatic wings, and has some striking views about Europe’s place in the world. The state of Texas has been reliably Republican for decades, but its demographics are changing; could it at last turn blue? And how Japan is dealing with its epidemic of public-transport groping.