Aging: “Healthy Longevity Global Grand Challenge” Offers $30 Million For “Audacious Proposals”

From a Harvard Gazette online article:

National Academy of Medicine Prize for Healthy AgingThe Grand Challenge Prize is looking for bold, audacious innovations, ideas that can really change aging. We’re looking in science, in technology and engineering, in policy, social sciences, behavioral sciences, economic policy, in traditional medical science and health care, and in work focused on specific diseases. It’s really very broad. We’re looking for innovative thinking that can have global impact. The prizes are going to roll out on three levels. There will be 450 Catalyst Prizes awarded over a three-year period. The first of the three yearly calls will be in January 2020. Once it’s announced, there will be six weeks to submit your idea — just the idea, it doesn’t require any pilot work — and a two-page application. They’ll be reviewed within four months and prizes announced by July. The Catalyst Award is intended as seed funding to get the idea into its earliest stages of development. They’re relatively small in dollar amount, about $50,000 each, but they will give access to an annual meeting bringing together world experts in these fields.

The world’s aging population means there will be an increasing number of older and sicker people at a time when declining fertility will saddle a smaller working population with the burden of supporting them. One solution is to keep people healthier longer, living independently, and contributing to society. In pursuit of that goal, the National Academy of Medicine is mounting a $30 million Grand Challenge contest to foster innovation in science, medicine, public policy, the workplace, and elsewhere. Sharon Inouye, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and head of the Aging Brain Center at Harvard-affiliated Hebrew Senior Life, is a National Academy member and a member of the planning committee for the Grand Challenge for Healthy Longevity. She spoke to the Gazette about the contest and how she hopes it changes the nature of aging in the decades to come.

To read more: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2019/11/grand-challenge-encourages-innovation-in-aging/

Modern Design: A “Vinyl Turntable Washbasin” By Pasque D. Mawalla

Santuri is a washbasin that pays homage to traditional musical roots.
Designed with cues from the iconic record player it’s a unique piece
aimed at all music lovers.

Its two-tone basin imitates the record players platter together with
its tonearm which in this case is the wash basins custom mixer.

pasque-dudley-mawalla-vinyl-turntable-washbasin.jpg

The functionality of the wash basin also borrows cues from how record players had worked. The turning of its tonearm towards the basin allows water to flow through the headshell of the mixer and when the tonearm is moved back into its starting positions stopping the flow of water just as it would work on a record player.

To read more: https://www.behance.net/gallery/79515115/Santuri

Insites Into Neuroscience: “EEG – A Mental Map” Infographic (IMotions)

Knowing how someone thinks is crucial to understanding their behavior. With EEG (electroencephalography), you can get access to this hidden world, and reveal what’s really going on in someone’s mind. EEG offers many advantages, but it can be tricky to get your head around in the beginning. This infographic from iMotions is designed to give you a head start to this powerful technology.

EEG-infographics-2018

Top Science Podcasts: A New Antibiotic From Nematodes, “Grants” Thru Lotteries (Nature)

Nature PodcastBenjamin Thompson brings you the latest science news. This week, an antibiotic that targets difficult to treat bacteria, and a roundup of the latest science news.

In this episode:

00:49 Discovering darobactin

Researchers looked inside nematode guts and have identified a new antibiotic with some useful properties. Research Article: Imai et al.

05:45 Research Highlights

Using urine as a health metric, and sniffing out book decay with an electronic nose. Research Article: Miller et al.Research Article: Veríssimo et al.

07:54 News Chat

Adding an element of chance to grant funding, a continental butterfly-sequencing project, and tracking endangered animals via traces of their DNA. News: Science funders gamble on grant lotteriesNews: Every butterfly in the United States and Canada now has a genome sequenceNews: Rare bird’s detection highlights promise of ‘environmental DNA’

To read more: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03588-z

Homebuilding Trends: “Squirrel Park” Homes In Oklahoma Built From Used Shipping Containers

From a Dezeen.com online review:

Squirrel Park Smith Design CompanyTwo containers make up the ground floor of each house, with two more cantilevered three metres over one end to create a sheltered porch below and a first-floor terrace off the master bedroom.

Oklahoma has a hot climate, so the steel containers have been painted white to reduce heat gain, while mirrored strips reflect the sun’s glare.

Squirrel Park Smith Design CompanySquirrel Park is a scheme of four houses made from converted shipping containers in Oklahoma City, USA, by Allford Hall Monaghan MorrisBuilt for a developer client who plans to live in one of the properties, Squirrel Park has four two-bedroom homes on a 2,500-square-metre site.

https://smithdesigncompany.com/squirrel-park/6y6kpxgw1o63uvt09y8viifgw7mj5q

A total of 16 lightly used steel shipping containers – which had “been around the world once” according to AHHM – were used to make the four houses. The three family homes not occupied by the developer will be rented at “competitive market rates”.

To read more: https://www.dezeen.com/2019/11/20/squirrel-park-ahmm-shipping-container-housing-oklahoma/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Dezeen&utm_content=Daily%20Dezeen+CID_edb46f16e2683f4b06c3c31148e551ac&utm_source=Dezeen%20Mail&utm_term=AHMM%20unveils%20shipping-container%20housing%20development%20in%20Oklahoma

Beverage Podcasts: As Beer Sales Slow, Coors And Budweiser Up Attacks Against Each Other (WSJ)

A 2019 Super Bowl ad kicked off a showdown between the maker of Bud Light and the maker of Coors Light. WSJ’s Jennifer Maloney explains how that standoff has led to accusations of corporate espionage, two lawsuits and questions about the future of the beer industry.

 

Photography: “Stunning” 52-Megapixel Photos Of Moon By Eric Morgunov

From an Interesting Engineering online article:

Morgunov said, “This picture is two different types of photos, a long exposure (to capture earthshine) and a fast shutter to capture the illuminated side.”

Eric Morgunov 52 Megapixel Photo of the Moon Using 500 Images

He continued to explain the additional images he used, which created the final piece: “The illuminated side is 500 photos of 1/60 at 100iso, was stacked and sharpened in autostakertt3 and registax6. The earthshine was around 15 photos at 3-second expo w/ 1600iso stacked and sharpened in autostakertt3 and registax6. I blended the two photos together in photoshop (a lot more work then it seems) added a star trail background gave it glow.”

https://www.instagram.com/ericmorgunov/

Eric Morgunov’s image of the Moon stands out for one main reason: it’s 500 pictures of the Moon brought together to create one incredible 52 megapixel photograph.

To read more: https://interestingengineering.com/man-creates-amazing-52-megapixel-photo-of-the-moon-using-500-images?_source=newsletter&_campaign=23rY2Mo8goQjd&_uid=46dBBxnxd7&_h=0c209d493fa27bb2c39469a873cbbd733289c833&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=mailing&utm_campaign=Newsletter-19-11-2019