Tag Archives: Washington

Walking Tour: Seattle In Northwest Washington

HP Walking ToursSeattle, chief city of the state of Washington, U.S., seat (1853) of King county, the largest metropolis of the Pacific Northwest, and one of the largest and most affluent urban centres in the United States. A major port of entry and an air and sea gateway to Asia and Alaska, Seattle lies alongside Puget Sound, a deep inland arm of the northern Pacific Ocean, and is at the centre of a conurbation that is defined roughly by Everett to the north, Bellevue to the east, and Tacoma to the south.

Video Timeline: 0:00:00 INTRO 0:00:46 Seattle Waterfront 0:04:07 Seattle Aquarium 0:06:20 Miner’s Landing 0:07:51 Seattle Great Wheel 0:10:39 A view towards the city skyscrapers 0:12:25 About Seattle (Open CC) 0:21:45 Seattle Art Museum 0:27:16 The Gum Wall, Post Alley 0:29:30 Pike Place Market 0:30:50 Fish throwing tradition at Pike Place Market 0:39:03 The First Starbucks at Pike Place Market 0:42:57 Post Alley 0:55:25 Seattle Public Library 1:00:00 The Sanctuary Seattle 1:01:34 Sky View Observatory at Columbia Center

The city was settled on November 13, 1851, at what is now West Seattle. It was relocated the following year to a site across Elliott Bay near a Duwamish Indian village. It owes its name to the Native American leader Seattle, chief of the Duwamish, Suquamish, and other tribes of the Puget Sound area. Areas of great natural beauty, including the densely forested Olympic Peninsula and the Cascade Range, surround the city. Its urban centre, dominated by tall skyscrapers that overlook Elliott Bay and enhanced by the city’s abundant parks and neighbourhoods, also offers a handsome prospect.

Walking Tour: Pike Place Market In Seattle (4K)

The Pike Place Market has been a defining Seattle icon for more than a century. Considered by many “the soul of Seattle,” the Market spans nine historic acres in the center of downtown where everyday locals and tourists alike shop, visit, eat and discover.

Founded in 1907, the Market is one of the oldest and largest continuously operating public markets in the United States and is brought to life by the hundreds of farmers, crafters, small businesses, and residents that call it “home”.

Public Transit: Seattle’s $54 Billion Railway (Video)

This could be the most ambitious public transit project in America.

SEATTLE has become one of the most attractive cities in the United States.

The tech boom has helped bring in some 1,000 new residents every week. Of course, all those new Seattleites need a way to get around, and things are getting crowded.

In response, the city has been expanding its rail system, and fast. The latest project, Sound Transit 3, will invest $54BN over the next 25 years to expand the network five-fold.

With the passage of the $1.2 trillion Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, American cities are getting a chance to rethink their public transit systems with fresh infrastructure funding.

And Seattle’s expansion might be the country’s most ambitious project yet.

Aerial Views: The Pacific Northwest (4K Video)

The Pacific Northwest, is a geographic region in western North America bounded by its coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean to the west and, loosely, by the Rocky Mountains to the east. 

Chapters: 0:00​ Pacific Northwest Travel Collection 0:01​ Arch Cape Oregon Coast 0:25 Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest 0:36 Weyerhaeuser Snoqualmie Mill 0:56 Frenchman Coulee The Feathers Vantage, WA 1:18 Wild Horse Wind Facility Eastern Washington 1:26 Mount Si North Bend Washington 1:34 Historic Buildings Tacoma Washington 1:50 Kachess Lake Easton Washington 2:14 South Fork Skykomish River 2:22 North Fork Snoqualmie River 2:39 Olallie State Park King County Washington 3:12 Alpental Ski Area

Views: Wildflowers In Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State

“Sunday Morning” visits wildflowers on Mount Rainier in Washington State. Videographer: Mike Griffith.

There are hundreds of species of wildflowers found in Mount Rainier National Park, far more than can be represented here. However, this identification guide is meant to help you familiarize yourself with some of the most common and interesting wildflowers you may see during your visit to the park. For identification of flowers in the field, you can download the Mount Rainier Wildflower site bulletin, ask a ranger, or purchase a variety of wildflower identification guidebooks available in the park visitor centers and gift shops.

Hiking Tour: Ross Lake National Recreation Area In Washington State (4K)

Ross Lake National Recreation Area is a US national recreation area in north central Washington just south of the Canada–US border. It is the most accessible part of the North Cascades National Park Complex which also includes North Cascades National Park and Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.

Aerial City Views: Spokane – Eastern Washington (4K)

Spokane is a city in eastern Washington state. It’s home to the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, which explores the region’s history through exhibits on art, culture and Native American heritage. Next door, Tudor-style Campbell House dates from the early 1900s. Vast Riverfront Park, site of the 1974 World’s Fair, has a sculpture walk. In the park, a cable car offers views over tumbling Spokane Falls. 

Science: What A ‘Mega’ Earthquake In The Pacific Northwest Will Look Like

Western Drought: Expect More Fires & Water Wars

As of mid-June, nearly three-quarters of the US’s West has been experiencing “severe,” “extreme,” or “exceptional” drought conditions. In addition to the states above, it also includes northern states like North Dakota and Montana.

Overall, climate change is playing a role. But there are smaller factors at play that are tied to climate change as well. Including…

  • Not enough rain. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) said the Southwest’s 2020 monsoon season (read: ‘nonsoon’) was “the hottest and driest summer/monsoon season on record.” And the decrease in rainfall is having an impact on today’s drought (think: not enough water for crops, lakes, or reservoirs). And for the little rain that has fallen, it could dry up faster because of…
  • Warmer temps. The NOAA dubbed 2020 the second-hottest year on record. And in late June, a record-breaking heat wave hit the Pacific Northwest, with the temperature reaching up to 112 degrees Fahrenheit in places like Portland, OR. (Psst…if you’re dealing with hot weather, here are some tips to stay safe.) Hotter, drier weather creates a thirsty environment, which speeds up evaporation. Rising temps are also causing snowpacks to melt faster, and they’re reportedly producing less runoff – a vital water resource. All of which means there’s less water available for communities and ecosystems.

Experts are also worried that the current dry and hot conditions will have a ripple effect, which brings us to wildfires. Last year’s West Coast wildfire season was the worst ever. Fires in California killed 31 people, burned more than 4 million acres, and destroyed thousands of buildings and structures. And this year, states like Arizona have seen an early start to their wildfire season. But the effects of the drought stretch even further.